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Roy Moore   Associated Press photo

No country for the squeamish of any age

- The Washington Times

America’s the greatest land of all, but it’s no country for sexually squeamish men, or women either, who are old enough to remember when dignity, decency and decorum were in season.

Illustration on port security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When port security is compromised

We have recently seen evidence of how our national security was compromised by the Obama administration’s approval of the Uranium One deal that gave Russia 20 percent of our uranium reserves. We are now learning more about the serious security compromise at Port Canaveral and its adjacent military infrastructure.

Illustration on access to good education by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ensuring equal access to education

The mission of the Office for Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Education is “to ensure equal access to education and to promote educational excellence through vigorous enforcement of civil rights in our nation’s schools.”

House Cleaning at the CFPB Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Protecting consumers from fraud and abuse

Following Richard Cordray’s resignation as director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the smart money is betting that President Trump will appoint Mick Mulvaney, head of the Office of Management and Budget, as acting director until a permanent replacement can be found. This would be a good move, as Director Mulvaney is known for his no-nonsense approach — and there is a lot of nonsense to be sorted out at the CFPB.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, and Vietnam Communist Party General Secretary Nguyen Phu Trong, right, wave during a welcoming ceremony at the presidential palace in Hanoi, Vietnam Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017. (Hoang Dinh Nam/Pool Photo via AP)

The double-edged sword of China

A few weeks ago, Chinese President Xi Jinping offered a Soviet-style five-year plan for China’s progress at the Communist Party Congress in Beijing. Despite his talk of global cooperation, the themes were familiar socialist boilerplate about Chinese economic and military superiority to come.

Illustration on 529 savings accounts by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Giving families a helping hand with educational expenses

Putting four children through college would be a challenge for most families. Certainly it is for Jenny Clark and her husband, Michael, but they have made saving for their children’s college educations a priority.

Illustration on King Josiah hearing the reading of the law    The Washington Times

Rediscovering the Bible lost in America

There’s an Old Testament story that bears striking resemblance to what’s going on today in America. It’s the story of King Josiah finding the lost Book of the Law.

Former President Bill Clinton speaks at a gathering in Little Rock, Ark., on Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017, marking 25 years since his election. He and his wife Hillary Clinton appeared before about 2,600 people at the event in the Statehouse Convention Center. (AP Photo/Kelly P. Kissel)

The liberal ruse of feminism

Charlie Rose, formerly of PBS and CBS. Glenn Thrush of The New York Times. The collapse of the liberal establishment Masters of the Universe continues. Yet for some reason, the Democratic and liberal establishment think now is the time to condemn … Bill Clinton.

American Negotiations with North Korea Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Encouraging signs following Trump’s visit to Seoul

I was part of a small fact-finding delegation to South Korea immediately after President Trump’s Nov. 7-8 visit. The message we received in Seoul was universal: President Trump’s visit was a success; his presentation at the National Assembly was well-received. To a person, all were appreciative of the president’s comments, juxtaposing a vibrant liberal democracy in the South and an authoritarian and capricious regime in the North.

Volunteers tie the wooden cross that was carried through the streets of Etna, Pa., a Pittsburgh suburb, to the larger cross in the cemetery where their annual "Drama of The Cross," service was done on Good Friday, Friday, April 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) ** FILE **

America on fire, as love for God cools

- The Washington Times

America was built on Judeo-Christian principles, steered into existence by Founding Fathers who believed — yes, even the less religious ones — that this republic could not survive absent a moral, virtuous people. My, how wise the founders. That was then. This is now: Roy Moore. Al Franken.

Illustration on cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Closing the cyber skills gap

In the digitally integrated world we live in today, it’s nearly impossible to function successfully in any industry without making cybersecurity staffing a priority. No matter the size, no matter the sector, businesses all across the country are in growing need of professionals who specialize in cybersecurity.

Illustration of Bill and Hillary Clinton by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A tale of two cultures

“Prospect of New Special Counsel Rattles Justice” was the scary front-page headline on a recent, worried edition of The Washington Post. The faux fuss was caused by Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ suggestion that after weighing recommendations from senior prosecutors, he might appoint a special counsel to investigate Hillary Clinton’s role in the Uranium One deal.

Map of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Nagorno Karabakh

Losing the moral compass over Nagorno-Karabakh

When it comes to American foreign aid, it is often the message — rather than the dollar figure — that matters. A textbook case is Nagorno-Karabakh, the internationally recognized Azerbaijani territory, illegally occupied by Armenia.

Related Articles

President Barack Obama, with Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker, center, and Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez, speaks during a meeting with members of his economic team in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, March 4, 2016. Obama spoke about U.S. employers adding 242,000 workers in February, driving another solid month for the resilient American job market. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Obama Foundation's newest director a tax haven hiding fat cat

- The Washington Times

One of the Obama Foundation's newest members of its board of directors is none other than Penny Pritzker, the Commerce Department secretary under the Barack Obama administration and the finance chair of Obama's 2008 campaign -- and oh yes, this too, a name that just surfaced in the Paradise Papers as tied to offshore tax havens. Well, would you look at that. One of anti-fat cat Obama's own foundation directors is an offshore tax haven sheltering fat catter.

Uranium none

Sensations that explode with a flash and a bang seize public attention, but the echo doesn't last forever. Charges of Russian collusion in the 2016 presidential election that lit up the night sky in the spring are fading now with the colors of autumn. But details emerging from cracks and crevices of the Obama administration demand attention.

In this Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017 photo, Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., addresses the Northam For Governor election night party at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017. Democratic candidate Ralph Northam won Virginia's race for governor. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

The real pain coming

The Republicans can't say they didn't deserve the spanking they got Tuesday night. The results in Virginia in particular were a wake-up call, and the Republicans have a talent for sleeping through the noise of an alarm clock. The Grumpy Old Party was cruising for a bruising, and it got one. Did the elephant learn anything?

Illustration of Harvey Weinstein by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sexual harassment just ain't what it used to be

Harvey Weinstein, who governed from the casting couch as the Stalinist emperor of Hollywood, is toppled now, done in by regiments of women who came forward with endless tales of malignant abuse. The man who made the movies worthy of 300 Oscar nominations, a man regarded in Hollywood as coming in "just after Steven Spielberg and right before God," may go on trial that could cost him his freedom. Rarely has success receded so swiftly.

All Credit No Cash Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Backing Fannie and Freddie with funny money

Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) Director Mel Watt recently made an urgent plea for Congress to decide on a long-term strategy for the government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs) Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, now in their 10th year of conservatorship overseen by his agency.

Rep. David Schweikert, R-Ariz., joined at left by Rep. Tom Rice, R-S.C., makes a point as the House Ways and Means Committee continues its debate over the Republican tax reform package, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Tax reform even Democrats can love

The principal focus of tax reform should be economic growth, not the deficit. It would be incredibly shortsighted to sacrifice growth for the deficit, because growth will eliminate the deficit. Growth is the solution. Tax reform will promote growth. Democrats should be voting for growth.

Illustration on bureaucracy and the disabled by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Disabled, and trapped in a bureaucratic backlog

Economic opportunity for all is the cornerstone of the American dream. There are many individuals, however, who face obstacles in reaching this opportunity because of their disability. These individuals have just as strong a desire to be self-sufficient as individuals without disabilities, but desire alone is not enough; the labor force participation rate for people with disabilities is just over 20 percent, compared to nearly 70 percent for people without disabilities.

Illustration on the battle of Stalingrad by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Remembering Stalingrad 75 years later

Seventy-five years ago this month, the Soviet Red Army surrounded -- and would soon destroy -- a huge invading German army at Stalingrad on the Volga River. Nearly 300,000 of Germany's best soldiers would never return home. The epic 1942-43 battle for the city saw the complete annihilation of the attacking German 6th Army. It marked the turning point of World War II.

Illustration on the escape skills of the Clintons by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary and Bill Houdini

How do they do it? I am not the first to compare the Clintons to Harry Houdini, the great magician and escape artist, but Bill and Hillary make him look like a rank amateur.

All quiet on Vegas shooting

The Las Vegas shooting happened on Oct. 1. It was covered by the news media for four to five days thereafter, with conflicting reports about the timeline, the shooter and the hotel security staff. Plus, even more conflicting reports were available from witnesses at the hotel and the venue, supported by audio and video recordings.

Remedial reading for Vladimir Putin and Bernie Sanders

Unlike many of his fellow academics, Yuri Slezkine, a professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley, is also an extremely gifted writer whose insight and erudition extend far beyond his specific discipline. He also has a keen sense of humor, which comes in handy when writing a massive book on a tragically depressing subject.