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George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sad tale of two stumbling parties

- The Washington Times

We’ve heard the words and music of this song before. The hoariest cliche in American politics, presented as accomplished fact by every wise head in academe and media after every wipe-out election, is that the losing party is finished. Kaput. Destroyed. Done for. Dead, as in the graveyard.

Royhingya refugees from Myanmar receiving food from Bangladeshi aid workers          Associated Press photo

A refugee emergency and the terrorism it breeds

Bangladesh has been a haven for the Rohingya people since they began fleeing unprovoked oppression in their home state of Rakhine on Myanmar’s western shore, bordering Bangladesh, in 2015. Denied citizenship in their own country, the Rohingya have been in conflict not only with the other citizens of Rakhine but also with the government of Myanmar, which considers many of them to be anti-government insurgents. The United Nations describes the Rohingya as one of the world’s most persecuted people.

Trump's Door and Wall Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

MAGA and DACA

What does it mean to ‘Make America Great Again’? That’s a seemingly simple question with no simple answer, but an important part of it is certainly fixing our broken systems.

Illustration on possible solutions to the North Korea situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump, the statesman, at the U.N.

President Trump is right. His speech at the United Nations was his third act of Reagan-like statesmanship, after the historically accurate, morally rooted and inspirational speeches in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and Warsaw, Poland. This time, he pointedly spoke for those who cannot speak in Iran, North Korea, Venezuela, and suppressed people around the world. It was a tour de force, and it’s hard to disagree with any word. Once again, Ronald Reagan would be nodding.

Illustration on Russia's attacks on Ukraine by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Taking Putin seriously

President Trump mentioned the word sovereignty 21 times in his address to the United Nations Tuesday, but said little about Russia’s efforts to seize parts of Ukraine, piece by piece, and threaten other neighboring states.

In this June 2, 2017, file photo, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks to the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Scott Pruitt, in fight for EPA life — literally

- The Washington Times

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has apparently generated so much controversy that radical green peeps are threatening him with near-regularity, to the point he’s now getting extra armed protection. Seriously, folks, some perspective, please. Are trees that important?

Angst of the Loser Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perennial taste of sour grapes

On her current book tour, Hillary Clinton is still blaming the Russians (among others) for her unexpected defeat in last year’s presidential election. She remains sold on a conspiracy theory that Donald Trump successfully colluded with Russian President Vladimir Putin to rig the election in Mr. Trump’s favor.

Courage and Vision of Columbus Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Good-bye, Columbus

With Columbus Day upon us leftist rage is approaching gale force. Blinded by their irrational hatred they denounce Columbus and the civilization he symbolized for every ill ever visited upon this hemisphere. They are domestic Taliban, whose goal is the cultural obliteration of our society.

A protester is silhouetted as he carries the United Nations flag during a rally against Nigerian President Buhari as pedestrians walk through federal plaza Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Jarring minds with facts, not fists

The economics of free speech have become quite strange. It took $600,000, a sea of police officers in riot gear and concrete barricades to ensure Berkeley didn’t devolve into anarchy and chaos when conservative political commentator Ben Shapiro came to town last week. Demonstrations outside remained mostly peaceful with only nine arrests. This, however, is a troubling sign in light of what comes next on Berkeley’s campus.

Illustration on John Dickinson     The Washington Times

Planting the seeds of American independence

This year marks the 250th anniversary of one of the most influential series of writings in American history: the first of John Dickinson’s Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, which appeared in 1767.

Then-first lady Barbara Bush and then-Missouri Gov. John Ashcroft attend a "Parents as Teachers" event in Florissant, Missouri, where Mrs. Bush reads to the children. (National Archives)

Reading is still fundamental, even amid hurricanes

- The Washington Times

Christian and Skyler were anxious. The 5-year-old Texas twins were set to enter kindergarten — until Hurricane Harvey ripped their world. Their school is among five north of Corpus Christi that remain shuttered, having lost heating and air conditioning systems, roofs, electrical systems and much of what ordinarily defines a schoolhouse, including children, teachers and books.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters about the Graham-Cassidy health care bill during a meeting with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump takes leadership reins, pushes top items of agenda

First, President Trump marshalled the full attention and focus of the federal government in response to hurricanes Harvey and Irma, winning broad praise for the federal government’s response. Criticism has not come, despite the size and scope of the storms and the harsh partisan atmosphere.

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Illustration on Edward Snowden and the NSA leak by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Traitor, thief, scoundrel, spy

My role in the Vietnam War was a minor one. I served as an 18-year-old seaman in the radio communication division aboard the USS Kitty Hawk as the aircraft carrier performed combat operations on "Yankee Station" off the coast of Vietnam in 1970 and 1971.

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner watched Donald Trump fill out his papers to be on the nation's earliest presidential primary ballot in 2015. Mr. Gardner says he will remain on the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, though he disagrees with voter fraud allegations made by the panel's vice chairman about his state. (Associated Press/File)

The old vote scam in the mountains

Here are some connect-the-dot facts: The New Hampshire-Massachusetts border is a mere 40-minute drive for civic-minded progressives in Boston. The Granite State has same-day registration, which means you can register to vote and then cast a ballot on the same day.

Illustration on economic growth since Trump's election by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Trump boom arrives

Anyone noticed through the fog of Russia, Comey, Charlottesville, and now two monster hurricanes that the U.S. economy is booming faster than any time since the late Clinton years?

Terrorists use families as shields

Hezbollah is a large Shiite military/terrorist organization with headquarters in Lebanon and funding by Iran. It is the major power broker in Lebanon and has supported Iran's efforts in Syria to stabilize the Assad government by fighting against the democratic forces and the Islamic State there.

Democracy for Rohingya, too

Let us recall when Western parliamentarians eulogized 'democracy' advocate and Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi. This was, after all, the lady who when asked about Myanmar's treatment of the Rohingya people, claimed they were interlopers.

Supporters of the Former Georgian President and former Ukraine official Mikheil Saakashvili clash with border guards at Shegini check point on Ukrainian-Polish border, Ukraine, Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. Saakashvili and a crowd of supporters are proceeding into Ukraine on foot after breaking through a line of guards on the Polish-Ukrainian border. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

Debating correct usage

Words have been abused and, like, cheapened in our present day, but they're still, like, important. He who controls the language, as Orwell reminded us, controls the debate. One of the satellite arguments in the debate over immigration is what to call those who break the law by crossing the border illegally.

In this Sept. 6, 2017, photo, Anthony Pham, talks in his Monroe, Ga., barber shop. He became a U.S citizen in 1987, five years after he immigrated from Vietnam.   Now a business owner and proud Republican in Georgias staunchly conservative 10th Congressional District, Pham says he supports maintaining legal status for immigrants who arrived in the country illegally as children, the so-called Dreamers brought by adult family members.  (AP Photo/Bill Barrow)

Doing the right thing about DACA

Once upon a time the Constitution meant something to everybody. Every American took pride in a Constitution that was written in plain language that anyone, even a lawyer, could understand. Ours was "a nation of laws," not of judicial fiat or bureaucratic whim. That was the strength of the exceptional nation.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017, at George Mason University Arlington, Va., campus. DeVos on declared that "the era of 'rule by letter' is over" as she announced plans to change the way colleges and university handle allegations of sexual violence on campus. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Betsy DeVos, like Trump, dinged for 'cruel' leadership

- The Washington Times

The left has found its newest talking point, and it's one that goes like this: All you Republicans are simply cruel and heartless -- vicious, even. That's what they're calling President Donald Trump, for DACA. That's what they're now saying about Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

Illustration on the deadly threat of North Korea by William brown/Tribune Content Agency

The perilous times ahead

President Trump faces a mountain of perilous political and national security issues in the months to come on a number of fronts, both here and abroad.

Illustration on the crossroads situation of America and Congress by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Crunch time for Congress

It's crunch time for the GOP -- priorities for the FY2018 budget and legislative solutions for the Dreamers and Obamacare -- can't be put off much longer.

Sen. Chuck Schumer. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Trading the ass for a little horse sense

- The Washington Times

Scenting blood, some of the Democrats dreaming of success in the midterm congressional elections are beginning to talk sense. The season of insult and abuse of the president is winding to a close, not because of regrets but the party grown-ups have concluded that making asses of themselves doesn't work.

Illustration on the impact of Chinese steel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When illegal goods cross the border

When we hear the president talk about the need for increased U.S. border security, we usually think of illegal immigration. But there is another crucial aspect to protecting our borders the president is working to address — the influx of illegal goods from foreign countries streaming across our borders — goods that threaten our domestic manufacturing industry, delay job growth and undermine our national security.

Illustration on the pains and challenges of addiction by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'Don't call my dad the "a" word'

September is National Recovery Month. We are facing a drug abuse death epidemic in America. Over 50,000 a year die from overdoses, 144 a day. President recently Trump recently declared it an "emergency."

Navy War College better than ever

Although I enjoyed reading Col. Anderson's op-ed on the U.S. Naval War College, I do wish it was based on fact and not ignorance ("The Naval University for Conflict Avoidance," Web, Sept. 5). The Naval War College of course studies and prepares for war. In fact, we have greatly expanded the war-fighting component of our curriculum in the past year, and had Col. Anderson researched his topic rather than seeking mere sensationalism he would have known better.

Learn from the past

Ed Rendell and Judd Gregg give an excellent bipartisan list of solutions to the national economic-security threat we face from Congress failing to raise the debt ceiling ("Playing politics with the nation's financial future," Web, Sept. 5). But they miss at least one solution that could solve many other problems: early investments in prevention.