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In this Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson, file)

Drain the education swamp: College students’ tyrannical behavior must be stopped

How many conversations have we had with our friends, family and co-workers wondering what happened to the millennials? We expect a new generation to have new ideas and new ways of approaching the world. So how do we explain when a new generation is steeped in bullying, complaining about hurt feelings, demanding “safe spaces,” and using pride in fragile egos and weakened emotional states as the excuse to condemn free speech?

Illustration on China's role in diffusing the North Korean nuclear threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Nobody’s fool over North Korean nukes

Our news-hack kids — or, as Obama chief spinner Ben Rhodes called them, the “27-year-old know-nothings” — don’t have a clue as to the operative history of the North Korean nuclear threat to Asia, the Pacific and the United States.

Illustration on lawsuits harassing energy producers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Energy producers’ uphill battle against wealthy environmentalists

American manufacturing has been undergoing a tough transition for decades. Import competition and currency manipulation by other countries as well as regulatory excess at home have all taken a toll in many sectors of manufacturing. Just as manufacturing in America appears to be coming back, it faces a formidable new threat: a cabal of activists, cunning lawyers, ambitious politicians and a network of well-heeled benefactors.

Removing Government Intervention Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Protecting American business abroad

Westerners applaud the actions of the Trump administration to end the war on the West waged by the Obama administration, including: President Trump’s efforts to revitalize energy production from federal lands — oil and gas and coal; his dispatch of the Environmental Protection Agency’s land-grabbing “waters of the United States” rule; and his order to revoke, roll back or revise the national monument decrees with which President Obama placed millions of acres of federal lands off-limits to economic and recreational uses.

Secure Air Traffic Control Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Privatization with a potential for danger

Relieving the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) of its oversight of our nation’s air traffic control (ATC) operations would create significant concerns in both military and homeland security air defense mission areas. House Transportation Committee Chairman Bill Schuster has advocated relentlessly for ATC privatization, drafting and promoting two separate bills outlining the move to privatized control of the busiest airspace in the world. Endorsed by the Trump administration, this move has repercussions beyond the inherent conflict of interest presented by a commercial airline governing board.

Illustration on the changing attitudes toward good and evil in Star Wars by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Choosing favorites in ‘Star Wars’

On May 25, 1977, the original “Star Wars” movie, “A New Hope,” made its debut. It immediately had an impact that is hard to measure, especially on the generation that would, unfortunately, be called “X,” itself a seemingly sci-fi moniker.

Illustration on the growing threat of nuclear crisis with North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Discounting the North Korea threat countdown

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, speaking to the Reagan National Defense Forum on Dec. 2, offered up a doomsday prediction. When asked how close the United States and North Korea are to war, Mr. McMaster replied, “It’s increasing every day.” Sen. Jim Inhofe, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, seconded that statement in even more distressing language: “It is important for us here in the Senate to communicate to the American people the credible, grave, and immediate threat that we face . We don’t have the luxury of time.”

A detail of the baby Jesus is seen in a Nativity scene in the East Room during a media preview of the 2017 holiday decorations at the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Colleges push hard for Christ-free Christmases

- The Washington Times

College administrators around the country, it seems, are rushing to acquiesce to even the most minor of voices on campuses to make sure the “C” word — that’s “C” for Christmas, shhh! — doesn’t cause angst in some offended student’s ears. Basically, they’re driving hard to drive out the reason for the season, Jesus Christ.

Illustration on The Washington Post's treatment of Judge Roy Moore by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Molested by the media

You don’t have to be a fan of Alabama’s Republican senatorial nominee Roy Moore to see that the Furies in the media aren’t willing to cut him a break even when his most lethal accusers have been caught falsifying the record. The late Charles Manson seems to have gotten a more sympathetic press. For the past two months, the “Never Moore” media have tried to sink the judge by insisting his dating of teenage girls when he was in his 30s was scandalous on its face, even when they were of age, their mothers approved and the women themselves conceded he never engaged in sexual misconduct.

Illustration on Roy Moore's run for the Senate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Roy Moore and the politics of winning

It now looks as if Roy Moore, the Republican candidate for the Senate in Alabama, will win his race, despite the publicity about his alleged improper behavior with a 14-year-old girl 38 years ago, and maybe others young girls as well.

FILE - In this May 7, 2015, file photo, labor union members and supporters rally for better wages in New York. Nearly 2 million New York workers are unionized. New York's powerful labor unions are lining up against a constitutional convention, warning voters that opening up the state's main governing document could lead to the erosion of worker protections and rights such as collective bargaining. In November 2017, New Yorkers will be asked whether to hold a convention, where delegates would consider big changes to the constitution. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Reining in the worker center end run

Is it the beginning of the end for Big Labor’s henchmen? You’d be forgiven if you think I’m referring to the Hoffas. I’m actually talking about so-called worker centers, which have recently been the labor movement’s bludgeon — all while avoiding federal rules on union transparency and conduct.

Illustration on the risks of the Middle-East peace process by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good Luck, Jared Kushner

Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, and Jason Greenblatt, formerly one of the president’s real estate lawyers, are pursuing what the president calls the “ultimate deal,” a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. We should wish them luck because they’re going to need it.

Related Articles

Washington Wizards guard Tomas Satoransky (31), of the Czech Republic, high-fives Kelly Oubre Jr. (12) during the second half of an NBA basketball exhibition game, Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)

On basketball: Without Wall, Satoransky gets his chance

- The Washington Times

Tomas Satoransky has dealt with sporadic playing time and usage since coming to the NBA last season. For the two weeks the Wizards are without John Wall, he will be strictly a point guard. Will that change what happens when Wall returns?

In this Nov. 9, 2016, file photo, Hillary Clinton pauses while delivering a speech conceding her defeat to Republican Donald Trump after the hard-fought presidential election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Obama IG guy flags 'strategic coordination' of State, Clinton on emails

- The Washington Times

Here's something you don't hear every day -- but an inspector general who was actually appointed by Barack Obama told Tucker Carlson of Fox News that there was "strategic coordination" taking place among the State Department, Campaign Team Hillary Clinton, certain key legal minds and politicos on Capitol Hill, regarding the behind-scenes talk of The Emails.

Illustration on Mohammed bin Salman by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The man who would be Saudi king

Mohammad bin Salman is a young man in a hurry. When I visited Saudi Arabia back in February he was only the deputy crown prince. Nevertheless, it was he — not 81-year-old King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud and not the crown prince, 58-year-old Muhammad bin Nayef — who was the talk of the town.

Illustration on a New York Times story on neo-Nazis by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In defense of The New York Times

I never expected to come to the defense of The New York Times, but here I am ready and willing to defend what I have hitherto called the Bad Times as opposed to the Good Times, that being The Washington Times.

Illustration on Palestinian efforts to thwart peace by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Calling out Palestinian peace process failures

The Palestinian Authority (PA), it appears, has decided to cut off communication with the American government as a result of a series of American actions the Palestinians believe disqualify Washington from acting as an honest broker in what passes for a "peace process" with Israel. This includes the Taylor Force Act, but most specifically it appears linked to a warning that the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) mission in Washington might be closed because the PA violated the terms of its presence.

The Next Civil War Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

From cold to hot civil war?

The increasing energy going into the intractable issues that divide Americans is producing a vicious cycle naturally tending toward violence. Members of the bipartisan class atop our administrative-corporate state's commanding heights believe they are entitled to rule inferior Americans, whose opinions they deem unworthy of respect. This has energized a sociopolitical revolt that has shrunk the Democratic Party's hold on elective offices around the country and placed Republican leaders under siege by their own voters. As a result, there is no longer a major constituency for restraint.

Portfolio Timebomb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A hidden tax bill time bomb

Lawmakers are rushing to finalize the details of the first major overhaul of the federal income tax in more than three decades. An obscure provision buried deep in the tax reform bill passed by the Senate Finance Committee is sure to rile retirees and other individual investors by mandating what stocks they have to sell first.

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., center, is flanked by Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., left rear, and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., as the Senate Budget Committee met to work on the Republican tax bill, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

A Christmas quarrel

Christmas lights usually signal a season of goodwill. But in Washington, they're more like the check-engine light on a dashboard, warning that time to fix the nation's finances is running out. Before the holidays give way to a new year, critical decisions on tax reform and budget levels must be made. The capital Christmas rush features a deathly struggle between congressional Republicans and their Democratic nemeses. Failure to reach a resolution would produce the sort of gloom that suffuses Charles Dickens' tale of Ebenezer Scrooge.

Oil platforms produce food, too

Did anyone else notice that President Trump recently opened up 76 million acres to offshore drilling ("Trump administration to offer 76M acres for offshore drilling, largest lease sale in U.S. history," Web, Oct. 24)?

Protest commissioner, not anthem

I'm an NFL fan but I'm no fan of Commissioner Roger Goodell or the NFL hierarchy. Let's just say I'm paying attention and I think someone needs to explain to these protesting players that Mr. Goodell himself is their worst enemy.

Ink-test refusal suspicious

Republican Sen. John Thune of South Dakota has said Alabama senatorial candidate Judge Roy Moore should dropout of the race due to the charges of sexual misconduct being leveled against him by four accusers — charges that are 40-odd years old. Mr. Thune has said Mr. Moore would be distracted by an investigation by the Senate Ethics Commission. But if Congress reveals the names of the 264 members of the House and Senate and staff against whom there have been charges of sexual or other misconduct since the mid-1990s, would Mr. Thune argue they should all resign their positions because investigations would distract them from their duties? I would hope not, because there is nothing more central to American justice than due process of law, which includes the right to question one's accusers and present one's witnesses.

The relationship with pets that saves lives

Dava Guerin and Keven Ferris, the authors of "Unbreakable Bonds: The Mighty Moms and Wounded Warriors of Walter Reed," have published another fine book about wounded veterans and their supporters.

Deborah Simmons

Metro should scrap its ad guidelines

- The Washington Times

Either the folks who run the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority don't want to understand how the U.S. Constitution, marketing and free speech work — or ignorance has finally taken its toll on the lot.