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Former President Barack Obama. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Another day at work, another congressional tantrum

- The Washington Times

Throwing tantrums and shutting down the government is a bipartisan sport. Both Republicans and Democrats have now thrown this particular tantrum, like children fighting over a toy, and it’s great fun only for the tantrum-throwers. The rest of us, and that includes both Democrats and Republicans, are not much amused.

The Shutdown Schumer T-shirt Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

But it’s not the ‘Trump shutdown’

- The Washington Times

Even with the shutdown averted, Democrats continue to act as if they believe that no matter what they do, Republicans will get the blame, but reality is beginning to undermine their narrative.

In this June 21, 2017, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed-door meeting in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Mr. Mueller, shut down this sham investigation

- The Washington Times

It’s time for the Russia collusion investigation into President Donald Trump to come to a halt. It’s a sham; it’s a web of deceits. And the American people are just not that stupid that its continuance can be justified any longer.

Illustration on the need to reform Federal welfare programs by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why welfare needs reform

With Congress back in session, what’s one of the more controversial items potentially on 2018’s legislative docket? Speaker of the House Paul Ryan says welfare reform is in the cards.

A 100 percent U.S. Angus beef Colby Jack Cheeseburger as part of U.S. President Donald Trump set is seen at Munch's Burger Shack restaurant in Tokyo Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017. The cheeseburger Trump had during his recent visit to Japan is still drawing lines at the Tokyo burger joint. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

The ‘plant-based burger’ scam

Animal activist groups are making obvious headway convincing meat eaters to put down the steak, according to a GlobalData analysis that estimates as many as 6 percent of U.S. consumers currently consider themselves vegans.

In this Feb. 1, 2017, file photo, Brooklyn College students walk between classes on campus in New York. The New York state Legislature approved a budget on April 9, 2017, that includes funding for Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo's plan to offer free tuition for middle-class students at state universities. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Taming the tuition tiger

You can’t put a price on education, the saying goes, but if you did, it would be very high. And the cost falls on everyone.

FILE - In this April 11, 2017 file photo, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, center, signs a bill between Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, left, and House Speaker Michael Busch during a bill signing ceremony following the state's legislative session at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Md.  Lawmakers are poised to act early in the upcoming legislative session on two high-profile issues: paid sick leave and medical marijuana. The General Assembly gathers Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018.   Democrats, who control the assembly, are expected to make a priority of overriding Hogan's veto of paid sick leave for businesses with 15 or more employees.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

A New Year’s present for Marylanders

Most Marylanders agree that Maryland income taxes are too high. In various rankings we almost always fall into the category of the 10 worst states. For example The Tax Foundation ranks Maryland 9th highest in individual income taxes per capita; and the 2018 business tax climate index ranks Maryland among the 10 worst of the 50 states.

For several years, the resurgent oil and gas sector was almost the sole truly bright spot of the economy. (Associated Press/File)

Free markets and free trade will fuel U.S. energy dominance

To further capitalize on America’s energy renaissance, the Trump administration should reconsider and look to strengthen free trade — particularly with Canada and Mexico, our two largest energy trading partners.

Illustration on merit-based immigration policy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s merit-based immigration system

For decades, the American people have been begging and pleading with our elected officials for an immigration system that is lawful and that serves our national interest.

Tax Cut Balloons Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Lasting and transformative tax relief

A staggering 13 billion dollars. More than the value of the entire “Star Wars” franchise. That’s the minimum amount taxpayers will save under the recently-passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act now that lawmakers have made compliance with the U.S. tax code less of a chore. Taxpayers will now also save an estimated 210 million hours of time they used to squander on the clumsy 1040 “long form.” Lighter paperwork burdens like these will begin showing up in other portions of the tax code for businesses and individuals as the new law is implemented.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Jan. 22, 2018.

The Democrats’ fiscal trap

With all the talk about a possible government shutdown due to an impasse on immigration reform, no one seems to be paying attention to a story of even bigger long-term consequence. Congress is preparing a two-year budget that blows past bipartisan spending caps to the tune of $216 billion through 2019. These are the latest stunning tallies from an analysis by Congressional Quarterly. (See chart).

Former President Richard Nixon. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

An Olympian break in the war between the words

- The Washington Times

A few Ping-Pong balls broke the Cold War ice around China a generation ago, following Richard Nixon’s stunning trip to Beijing (when it was still called Peiping), and soon the United States and China were on their way to normal diplomatic relations.

Illustration on the recent nuclear alarm in Hawaii by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Hawaii error and liberal hysteria

Murphy’s Law was written to describe how governments work. It was proved yet again on January 13 when an employee of the Hawaii Emergency Management System sent a cellphone alert that said, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” The alert was false but until it was corrected almost 40 minutes later it terrified millions of residents and tourists.

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President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in Washington. From left, Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., Trump, Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump's new TV show -- genius at work

- The Washington Times

A Trump charm and, yes, intelligence lit up television screens all over America on Tuesday afternoon. Freed from the restraints and cautions of Bannonism, the president suddenly seems to soar like an eagle.

How 99 percent of 'Palestine refugees' are fake

In the words of a veteran Washington hand, the problem of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), the main U.N. agency dealing with Palestinians, is always important but never urgent. Well, it just became urgent.

Europe's silence

It's tempting to say that Europe's leaders lack the courage of their convictions. But that would imply that they have convictions. The evidence suggests those days are gone.

Pope Francis delivers his speech to diplomats accredited to the Holy See, during an audience for the traditional exchange of New Year greetings, in the Regia Hall at the Vatican, Monday, Jan. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, Pool)

Pope Francis admits: Not all migrants good, not all border limits bad

- The Washington Times

Pope Francis made a somewhat eyebrow-raising remark the other day -- eyebrow-raising because it's such a 180 from his normal progressive talk -- and it's one that went like this: Not all migrants are in the migrant move for the job opportunities. They're not all honorable in intent. Some, he said, may have less than praiseworthy intentions.

Rancher Cliven Bundy, center, emerges Monday, Jan. 8, 2018, flanked by his wife, Carol Bundy, left, and attorney Bret Whipple, right, from the U.S. District Court building in Las Vegas. A judge in Las Vegas on Monday dismissed criminal charges against the Nevada rancher and his sons accused of leading an armed uprising against federal authorities in 2014. (AP Photo/Ken Ritter)

Cliven Bundy case highlights what Ronald Reagan warned

- The Washington Times

It was Ronald Reagan who famously warned of the dangers of government -- who said "the most terrifying words in the English language are, 'I'm from the government and I'm here to help.' " Now, more than three decades later, it's the Cliven Bundy family who underscores that sentiment.

In this Nov. 25, 2014, file photo, people watch as stores burn in Ferguson, Mo. The one-year anniversary of the shooting of Michael Brown, which sparked months of nationwide protests and launched the "Black Lives Matter" movement, was on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Trump's insane? Democrats the party of lies, sex and rape

- The Washington Times

There's an old biblical principle that goes like this: Don't try and pull the speck from another's eye without first removing the log from your own. Democrats, on an all-courts-press to paint President Donald Trump as a mental nutcase, would do well to remember this adage.

President Donald Trump smiles while watching the NCAA National Championship game at Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Monday, Jan. 8, 2018, in Atlanta, between Alabama and Georgia. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Better facts, more humor

Are you aware that the White House, congressional offices and most major media employ "fact checkers"? Given the amount of misinformation these organizations spew, a reasonable conclusion is that the fact checkers are often biased, ignorant, or ignored.

Illustration on Trump's infrastructure budget challenges by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's opportunity to shine

President Trump demonstrated he can work with the Republicans in congress by passing the Tax Cut and Jobs Act. The nation's sagging infrastructure offers an opportunity to reach across the aisle and prove he can lead the nation in common purpose.

Illustration on Trump's infrastructure palns by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A blueprint for prosperity

When a golden spike was driven into the rails connecting the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads at Promontory Summit, Utah Territory on May 10, 1869, interstate railways annihilated distance in the space of one generation and transformed America into a unified nation from coast to coast. The cost for an American to travel across the continent dropped from $1,000 to $150.

Illustration on the tax reform bill's impact on economic growth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reaping the benefits of Trump's first year

With several weeks of January still to go, President Trump is wrapping up a masterful first year in office. Despite — or perhaps in part because of — unprecedented, unremitting hostility from the entire American establishment, Mr. Trump has redirected American policy to serve American interests. America — and the world — is already reaping the benefits.