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Illustration on copyright protection by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Copyrights and patents, piracy and theft

April 26 is World Intellectual Property Day — a day too little-noticed in most quarters but which shouldn’t be.

Illustration on tariffs and energy production by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the ‘America-First Offshore Energy Strategy’ could bottom out

President Trump has admirably prioritized America’s energy assets, declaring his administration’s goal of creating an era of American “energy dominance.” But as things stand today, the biggest obstacle to Mr. Trump’s vision is — spoiler alert — President Trump, thanks to his ill-conceived and hasty action to order a 25 percent tariff on imported steel products.

President Donald Trump speaks at the Generation Next Summit in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Thursday, March 22, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

How immigration affects environmental policy

No one would mistake President Trump for an environmentalist. Yet his immigration policies could inadvertently safeguard the environment far better than any proposal from Greenpeace or the Sierra Club.

Illustration on the dangers of abolishing the Second Amendment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Second Amendment is here to stay

In a recent New York Times commentary, former U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice John Paul Stevens argued that the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution — the one that acknowledges the “right to keep and bear arms” — is a “relic of the 18th century.” Justice Stevens wants “a constitutional amendment to get rid of the Second Amendment” as a simple way to fight the National Rifle Association, which blocks gun-control legislation.

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Civil liberties lawyer and prominent liberal Alan Dershowitz on Monday blasted the left for its continued speculation about President Trump's mental stability. (Fox News)

Searching and seizing

'The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." — Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

Swamp Cannon Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The real threat to Trump

In the midst of worrying about North Korea, Syria and Democrats taking control of the House of Representatives this fall, President Donald Trump is now worrying about a government assault on his own business, which targeted his own lawyer.

Why Trump should stand by his tariffs

There will not be a trade war, if President Trump stands by his principles on the tariffs. Because Mr. Trump has already made America great again. And our trade adversaries and cheaters need us more than we need them.

Robert Mueller at the crossroads

Robert Mueller was appointed special counsel in May 2017 in reaction to a media still gripped by near hysteria over the inexplicable defeat of Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election.

Steering clear of climate alarm

Sunday, April 22 will mark the 48th anniversary of Earth Day. A lot of concern about the planet's future was generated back then and a passionate movement was launched that endures to this day.

Tax Day Harvest Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

For many, Tax Day will be a bit less gloomy

Federal income tax returns for 2017 must be postmarked or submitted electronically to the IRS by midnight April 17 this year — two days later than usual.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., announces to reporters he will not run for re-election and will retire next year at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The speaker exits

"Nice guys finish last" is part of the lore of baseball, an insight by Hall of Fame player and manager Leo Durocher, but it could be the epitaph for the Washington career of Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House who is widely praised for civility and good manners. He announced Wednesday that he's fed up and going home.

Soldiers can be atheists, too

Atheism is a non-belief in a god, while humanism is an ethical view ("Navy rejects 'non-theist' for chaplain corps; lawmakers warn against changing core mission," Web, March 27). Being a humanist chaplain would not mean, as some seem to believe, jumping at the chance to tell soldiers who believe in a deity that one does not exist.

Recognize Israel's right to Golan

As President Trump weighs a response to the latest deadly Syrian chemical-weapons attack on civilians, he should consider formally recognizing Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights ("Trump unleashes anger on 'Animal' Assad over apparent chemical attack in Syria," Web, April 8).

A president with failings of his own making

In terms of formal education and academic background, Woodrow Wilson ranks high -- perhaps at the top -- of any list of intellectual American presidents.

John Boehner's new, hypocritical marijuana money-making gig

- The Washington Times

John Boehner's got a new gig -- and it's tied to selling marijuana. How nice. Look at this headline from Quartz: "420,000 people were arrested for selling marijuana while John Boehner ran Congress. That speaks volumes, but can all be summed in a single word just the same: Hypocrite?

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill on Tuesday. (Associated Press)

Mark Zuckerberg's misguided turn toward AI to define 'hate speech'

- The Washington Times

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told members of Congress -- as well as a rapt TV audience -- that "hate speech" is tough to define, but within a few years, he expects artificial intelligence to assume a greater role in sifting the nuances of social media content on the company's pages and begin red-flagging and booting posts deemed hateful and hate-filled. This is hardly comforting.

In this March 20, 2018, file photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin pauses as he speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Will Paul Ryan challenge Trump in 2020?

- The Washington Times

Never Trump Republicans and establishments types in Washington have been pining for a White Knight to sweep in after the expected mid-term defeats this November to challenge Trump for the 2020 nomination. And Ryan appears to come right from central casting to play the part.

Special counsel Robert Mueller is mandated to submit a confidential report to the attorney general at the conclusion of his investigation, but there are major ambiguities about whether a full release of the information would be in the public interest. (Associated Press/File)

Trump almost fired Mueller over fake news report

- The Washington Times

The initial reports of the financial investigation turned out to be erroneous. They were fake. They were fake news. Bloomberg, Reuters and the Wall Street Journal all ran with the story until finally issuing a correction and update. But, as is usually the case, the damage was done as cable news stations ran with the report with non-stop breathless coverage and analysis.

U.S. Rep. Lou Correa is defending a student painting hanging in his office that depicts the Statue of Liberty wearing a hijab, despite allegations that it violates the separation of church and state. (YouTube/@We The People Rising)

DC area hate crime hoax: Teen girl claimed man ripped off head scarf

- The Washington Times

The incident is yet another hoax that gained intense media attention when first reported but then disappears into the ether when the facts finally come to light. The multiple reports of so-called hate crimes against Latinos and Muslims miraculously appeared after the 2016 presidential election and the media breathlessly reported on each instance in an effort to describe a larger trend of hate in America inspired by Donald Trump.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 10, 2018, about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Mark Zuckerberg, Robert Mueller's right-hand man

- The Washington Times

Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook, told members of the joint Senate meeting of the committees of Commerce, Science and Transportation and of Judiciary that yes, he is helping Robert Mueller with his special counsel business. Does anyone else find this a bit unsettling?