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Illustration on the end of Net Neutrality regulations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Network neutrality comes to an end

They finally did it. After six months of debate, during which it received over 23 million public comments (of which half may have been fraudulent), the Federal Communications Commission voted on Dec. 14 to eliminate the network neutrality rules it imposed on broadband network operators during the Obama era.

Illustration on Hanukkah by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hanukkah, the first battle against transnationalism

Many think of Hanukkah as a fight for religious freedom. While religious freedom was at stake, it was part of a broader battle in behalf of the concept of national identity. The Maccabees, local Judeans who spearheaded the revolt against the overpowering northern Syrian Greeks, and who inspired the grass-roots, did so for the overarching cause of retaining Judea’s identity and Jewish character, which was under assault by those trying to denude Judea of its distinctiveness.

Illustration on global harmony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

People, planet and climate working together

Another year of weather is coming to a close. Even with some record-breaking snowfall from this past weekend’s storm in the eastern U.S., in many ways weather this year was not much different from any other year since the regular recording of temperature, precipitation and wind began across much of the globe 150 years ago.

Trump Administration Record on School Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping his promise about school choice

During the 2016 presidential campaign, candidate Donald Trump spoke passionately and often about school choice. Some school choice advocates, however, are beginning to rumble about the lack of progress on this key domestic policy promise. This grumbling has been building for some time among “talking heads” in the think-tank world.

Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off the stage with wife Kayla Moore after he spoke to supporters after an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. Moore didn't concede the election to Democrat Doug Jones. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

What Roy Moore’s defeat portends

There were plenty of reasons why Republican Roy Moore’s defeat in the scandal-plagued Alabama election was a blessing for the GOP, despite losing a seat in a closely divided Senate.

Illustration on the GOP and the death penalty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Republicans reconsidering the death penalty

The mere idea of Republicans sponsoring death penalty repeal bills in great numbers was once considered an unlikely notion. However, Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty recently released a report revealing how Republicans are championing measures to end capital punishment at never-before-seen rates.

Doug Jones is greeted by a supporter before speaking during an election-night watch party Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. Jones has defeated Republican Roy Moore, a one-time GOP pariah who was embraced by the Republican Party and the president even after facing allegations of sexual impropriety. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Doug Jones — and Trump’s life just got a lot harder

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has been beating a dead horse in Congress for almost a year now, trying to pass his agendas legislatively through a Senate that’s dominated by Republicans yet consistently falls to Democratic Party will because of an ever-looming threat of filibuster. It’s only going to get tougher for Trump. Prepare for the stalled and even dropped legislation.

Illustration on Iranian influence in the Persian Gulf region by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s indirect strategy for regional influence

Last month, Yemen’s Houthis, the Iranian-supported rebel faction that now dominates the southern Persian Gulf’s most volatile state, fired a ballistic missile that came close to the Saudi capital, Riyadh, before being intercepted by the country’s military. The incident was a clear sign of the deepening sectarian conflict between Tehran and Riyadh now taking place throughout the Middle East. But it was also an accurate reflection of the sort of asymmetric tactics being prioritized by Iran in its strategy for regional dominance.

An open process for revamping net neutrality

While the pall of scandals and alleged scandals in the nation’s capital may have many voters thinking of the Beltway as a dysfunctional wasteland, the reality is that much of the machinery of government is, in fact, going full throttle trying to create jobs and spur growth. Only you wouldn’t know it from the daily news cycle.

Invisible Political Hand Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The invisible hand of economics

The invisible hand of American presidential politics is economics. Almost imperceptibly guiding the electorate, no other issue is as determinant of a presidency’s success. Currently, it is supporting Donald Trump through his political problems and could push him to re-election, as it has so many others.

In this Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson, file)

Drain the education swamp: College students’ tyrannical behavior must be stopped

How many conversations have we had with our friends, family and co-workers wondering what happened to the millennials? We expect a new generation to have new ideas and new ways of approaching the world. So how do we explain when a new generation is steeped in bullying, complaining about hurt feelings, demanding “safe spaces,” and using pride in fragile egos and weakened emotional states as the excuse to condemn free speech?

Illustration on China's role in diffusing the North Korean nuclear threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Nobody’s fool over North Korean nukes

Our news-hack kids — or, as Obama chief spinner Ben Rhodes called them, the “27-year-old know-nothings” — don’t have a clue as to the operative history of the North Korean nuclear threat to Asia, the Pacific and the United States.

Related Articles

Tax Shrink Zapper Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Tax cut for everyone

Whenever I'm asked whether the Trump tax cut is for the rich, I say yes. It is a tax cut for the rich. It is a tax cut for the middle class. It is a tax cut for small businesses. It is a tax cut for the Fortune 100. If you pay federal income taxes, you will in almost all cases, be getting more take-home pay come January 1.

Wasted College Education Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Bringing light to the dark halls of the ivory tower

Since the release my book, "Not A Day Care: The Devastating Consequences of Abandoning Truth," I have been asked over and over again by the likes of everyone from Pat Robertson and Adam Carolla to Glenn Beck, Dennis Prager, Dana Perino and Jim Dobson: "Okay, Dr. Piper, you've identified the problem in our colleges and universities, now what's the solution?

Craig Warner of Palo Alto, Calif., leaves a bell at a memorial site for Kate Steinle on Pier 14 Friday, Dec. 1, 2017, in San Francisco. In this fiercely liberal city, city leaders remained attached to San Francisco's sanctuary city status despite a not guilty verdict in a killing that sparked feverish immigration debates because the man who fired the gun was in the country illegally after being deported five times. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

The further tragedy of Kate Steinle

The San Francisco jury that would not recognize Jose Garcia Zarate as guilty of the murder of Kate Steinle not only mocked simple justice, but further identified San Francisco as a city exiled from the American mainstream, and intensified the debate on whether like-minded cities and counties can declare themselves outside the laws that govern everyone else.

In this Aug. 12, 2017 file photo, white nationalist demonstrators, right, clash with a counter demonstrator as he throws a newspaper box at the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Va. The deadly white nationalist demonstration in Virginia has brought new attention to an anti-fascist movement whose black-clad, bandana-wearing members have been a regular presence at protests around the country in the last year. Members of the antifa movement were among those protesting the Charlottesville rally last weekend. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Bad news for hooligans

The antifa movement has had a free ride in American public opinion since its hooligans first came to public notice in the riots at the Robert E. Lee statue in Charlottesville, Va.

Too much Twitter?

The old World-War-II-era posters with the warning "Loose Lips Sink Ships" may need to be updated given Twitter and the various forms of "social" media that abound. This is especially true for politicians.

Bringing drama to the widest possible audience

In 2009 Britain's National Theatre began making high-definition films of live productions for relay to cinemas. Artistic Director Nicholas Hytner was elated that audiences world-wide could watch "the same event at the same time as the audience in the theatre." His enthusiasm for bringing drama to the widest possible audience is one of the underpinnings of "Balancing Acts," his memoir of his years (2003 -2015) at the National.

Left's utter 'free speech' hypocrisy

The irony of free speech in the current political environment certainly hits home with two recent Times articles. A speaker delivered a talk titled "It's OK to Be White" on the University of Connecticut campus was booed, harassed and had his notes taken from the lectern ("Conservative speaker arrested at UConn after fight at 'It's OK To Be White' speech," Web, Nov. 28). Later the speaker, Lucian Wintrich was arrested for a breach of peace.

Jimmy Kimmel doesn't appear too shaken up that his Republican viewership has taken a plunge since he waded into politics on his late-night ABC talk show. Appearing on "CBS Sunday Morning," the comedian said he wouldn't change a thing about his approach to President Trump or heated topics like health care and gun control. (CBS)

Jimmy Kimmel goes all Christiany on Roy Moore -- and accepts fight

- The Washington Times

Jimmy Kimmel, of comedy talk show fame, apparently is a card-carrying Christian who's been so offended by Roy Moore, that he first, sent a character from his show to disrupt one of the Senate candidate's rallies and then, when confronted, jumped on Twitter and late-night TV and agreed to a man-to-man. That's right. Kimmel actually agreed to a fight with Moore.

In this July 7, 2015, file photo, Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, right, is led into the courtroom by San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi, left, and Assistant District Attorney Diana Garciaor, center, for his arraignment at the Hall of Justice in San Francisco. (Michael Macor/San Francisco Chronicle via AP, Pool, File)

Trump nails it -- Kate Steinle ends in 'disgraceful verdict'

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump tweeted that the trial of Jose Ines Garcia Zarate in the killing of Kate Steinle ended with a "disgraceful verdict." And he's absolutely right. No matter the finding of the jury, it doesn't change the fact Garcia Zarate never should have been in America in the first place -- never should have been on the streets of San Francisco.

Hedy Lamarr . (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When the prey becomes the predator

- The Washington Times

It's only a matter of time until the female of the species becomes predator, and is caught in the web of what the country preacher called "he'in and she'in," which has been the favorite game of men and women since Eve disdained perfection in the Garden of Eden.

Jeff Sessions at the Department of Justice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Jeff Sessions' ambitious Justice Department

In February, 2016, a full nine months before the presidential election and days before Super Tuesday, Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions endorsed Donald Trump, the first sitting senator to do so. I recall being in a meeting of several other Washington conservatives with Mr. Sessions shortly after his endorsement. Mr. Trump, said Mr. Sessions "is the candidate who is the best advocate for our ideas. If he wins, he has the best chance of putting the country back onto the conservative mold left by Ronald Reagan."

Illustration on the U.S. reflecting on its motivations in foreign policy actions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Aligning with Saudi Arabia's designs

The United States faces a question that it seems to want to ignore: What kind of nation are we? The question looms up in the face of America's complicity in an ongoing humanitarian crisis in the Middle East. We are helping Saudi Arabia starve the people of Yemen — men, women, and children — into submission to the Saudi will.

Illustration on Somalia taking up the fight against the al-Shabab insurgency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

It is up to Somalia to combat al-Shabab

According to U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), there have been 18 airstrikes to date this year in Somalia — more than four times the average for the previous seven years. At the same time, the number of U.S. forces in Somalia has more than doubled. The target of the U.S. military in Somalia is al-Shabab, an Islamist militant group allied with al Qaeda and now considered the deadliest terrorist organization in Africa.

Illustration on Republican tax legislation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The anticipated tax legislation

Benjamin Franklin, who famously said that nothing in this world can be certain "except death and taxes," would love the Republican tax cut bill that's headed for a vote in the Senate this week.

2017 AP YEAR END PHOTOS - Opposition lawmakers brawl with pro-government militias who are trying to force their way into the National Assembly during a special session coinciding with Venezuela's independence day, in Caracas, on July 5, 2017. At least five lawmakers were injured in the attack. (AP Photos/Fernando Llano)

From revolution to ruin in Venezuela

Not so long ago Venezuela, which stumbles along as if on a national breadline, was the wealthiest country in Latin America. And why not? It has the world's largest proven oil reserves and abundant fertile farmland. Its governmental institutions were once efficient and largely free of corruption. With a few good funerals, times could be good again.

Vice President Mike Pence speaks to a gathering of Republican governors in Austin, Texas, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017, at the J.W. Marriott. (Ricardo B. Brazziell/Austin American-Statesman via AP) ** FILE **

Discretion makes a comeback

That's Vice President Mike Pence getting the last laugh in the wake of the torrent of sexual-misconduct charges against Washington politicians, journalists and entertainment industry titans who are suddenly not so titanic.

Reform Mauritania now

The United Nations sets aside Dec. 2 as its International Day for the Abolition of Slavery. From sweatshops and prison labor, to trafficked women and men forced into unpaid work or prostitution, some 40 million people around the world are held in horrific conditions. But if there's an open sore, it's Mauritania in West Africa.