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Electrical lines will be used for broadband Internet access as IBM Corp. partners with a smaller firm to improve access for rural areas not served by cable or DSL. They plan to work with local electric cooperatives. (Getty Images)

Breaking up the public broadcaster monopoly

The notion of a profound “digital divide” between urban and rural areas in America is hardly new. The real issue is what America should do about it — and whether the government or private sector should take the lead.

Phishing Moscow Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Mueller in hot pursuit

Last Friday, a federal grand jury sitting in Washington, D.C., indicted 13 Russian nationals and three Russian corporations for conspiracy and for using false instruments and computer hacking so as to influence the American presidential election in 2016. The indictment alleges a vast, organized and professional effort, funded by tens of millions of dollars, whereby Russian spies passed themselves off as Americans on the internet, on the telephone and even in person here in the U.S. to sow discord about Hillary Clinton and thereby assist in the election of Donald Trump.

Russia's Puppet Candidate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The great strategic deception

The underlying theme promoted by the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee (DNC), supported by the mainstream media, that there was collusion between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin to ensure a Hillary Clinton defeat, never made any strategic sense.

President Barack Obama laughs with Vice President Joe Biden during a ceremony in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) ** FILE **

Tracking the real collusion: Obama knew foreign entities were interfering; he did nothing

There is a lot of noise lately, and less signal, about the now debunked “Trump colluded with Russia” narrative. After special counsel Robert Mueller indicted 13 Russians for trolling Americans during the 2016 election, Democrats and various malcontents are in a tizzy to move their narrative goalposts. “Well,” they insist, “Trump said the whole Russian thing was a hoax. Now it’s proven it wasn’t,” or some such nonsense.

Nervous in North Africa

Officials in Morocco are apprehensive. “Africa is approaching a dangerous moment,” one of the Kingdom’s most senior political figures told me recently in Rabat. His bleak assessment, which I heard in virtually every meeting during my recent visit to the country, stems from what are essentially two factors.

Ottoman Slap Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turkey’s violence-tinged foreign policy

Speaking recently about his military’s ongoing invasion of the Kurdish-ruled Afrin region in northern Syria, Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan taught much of the world a rather bizarre term.

Illustration on Poland's new Holocaust law by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Poland’s new Holocaust law is a mockery

The French philosopher Voltaire said, “History is nothing but a pack of tricks that we play upon the dead.” Poland’s new Holocaust law is yet another pack of tricks played upon the millions of murdered Jews in the Holocaust.

Illustration on Trump's Goldilocks economy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s Goldilocks economy

President Trump may have a bear market, but he has a Goldilocks economy. While it is too early to definitively know about the former, each passing day shows the latter growing more certain. His critics who are seizing on recent stock market volatility are missing the bigger picture of the economy underlying it.

Illustration on sexual misconduct and opera by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sexual harassment in opera

Opera has it all. Love. Murder. Rape. And most fascinating, in the case of Puccini’s “Tosca” a peek into the rapist’s thinking. In fact, he tells all. In church.

Vladimir Putin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Everybody’s playing the new game in town

- The Washington Times

Washington measures everything and everyone by politics, and dysfunction is the new game in town. Rant and rage has become the lingua franca of the nation’s capital. Taking the measure of Robert Mueller’s indictment of 13 Russian cybernauts for interfering on Vladimir Putin’s behalf in the 2016 presidential campaign is easy.

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Illustration on the complicated peace process in Gaza by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hopeless in Gaza

Gaza has been an unhappy place for a long time but the situation is now reportedly growing desperate. Jobs are scarce, electricity is intermittent, drinking water is unsafe, and raw sewage released into the Mediterranean is washing up on Gaza's white sandy beaches.

Illustration on accusations of racism at Penn State by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Professor Amy Wax and the Brownshirts on campus

Recently a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School in league with a professor at the University of San Diego Law School made bold to write an essay for The Philadelphia Inquirer. Her name is Amy Wax, and I have no idea what her politics might be. That she has gained tenure at Penn suggests that she is a liberal, but that is about all I know about her. If she were teaching when I was in college back in the 1960s she almost certainly would have been a liberal. There were very few conservatives back then.

Robert Mueller

Special counsel Robert Mueller has assembled a team of 17 prosecutors for the Russia probe. Nine have donated to President Barack  Obama, Hillary Clinton or the Democratic Party.

Another minnow in Mr. Mueller's net

The Russians are coming, the Russians are coming, but without the exclamation points. Indeed, they're already here. Robert Mueller announced another indictment Tuesday, this time of a Dutchman, but he has a Russian wife, which counts for something in the fear index. Mr. Mueller was expected to haul in at least a tuna by now, and so far has landed only minnows. But there's no doubt more to come.

Stop arguing, start protecting

We are all wrestling with the tragedy and evil that came to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, last week. As a citizen and parent, I'd ask our leaders in the school system to focus on reality, not on theory or wishes. In the childlike part of our souls, most of us would love to live in a world without evil, but that is not the world in which we live.

Legislators must act on guns now

As a retired school superintendent and former high-school principal, I was sickened by the images from the school shooting in Florida last week. As we all retreat into our respective positions regarding guns in America, I pose one question: Is change needed or do we accept the periodic slaughter of our fellow citizens? When we are unable to act on the most obvious of problems, we should never be expected to respond to more complex challenges.

Donald Trump greets Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, after announcing his endorsement of Romney during a news conference, Thursday, Feb. 2, 2012, in Las Vegas.  (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson) ** FILE **

Trump endorses Romney, showing how GOP ought to act

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump sent out a tweet of praise for former Massachusetts governor and failed presidential hopeful Mitt Romney, endorsing his one-time White House rival for the Senate in Utah. Have to say -- this is lot classier than how Romney treated Trump. GOP, pay attention. There's much to be learned from this president.