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In this April 21, 2018, file photo, people watch a TV screen showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The signs read: "North Korea says it has suspended nuclear tests." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

A summit imperiled by Rocket Man’s travel tribulations

- The Washington Times

“Just getting there, as Cunard once boasted of transatlantic crossings by ship, “is half the fun.” The Atlantic is still there, but ocean liners are not, and almost the only way to cross the ocean sea now is by air. That’s no fun at all. Dining aboard an ocean liner has been replaced by dining aloft, and you’re lucky to get a pretzel or a stale cracker.

Illustration on the Syrian situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What’s next in Syria

Western civilization — in the guise of its three leading powers — struck back at international lawlessness when they hit Syrian chemical sites on April 13. It remains to be seen whether the strike had the desired effect of deterring the Syrian leadership from the further use of such weapons. If it does, President Trump’s claim of “mission accomplished” will be justified. That brings up the key question of “what next?” if chemical weapons use continues.

Unlocked from Poverty Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Unlocking America’s full potential

Thanks to tax reform, deregulation and America’s can-do spirit, our economy is strong. Unemployment is at its lowest level since 2000, wages are rising, and businesses are bringing jobs back to the United States. Despite these tremendous economic gains, we have yet to unlock America’s full potential.

Mike Pompeo. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democratic terror of a miracle in North Korea

- The Washington Times

Trying to spark a new romance, or even arrange a weekend tryst, is not always easy. It’s impossible with the help of spectators eager to throw things, not orange blossoms but sticks and stones with sharp edges. But that’s how Washington tries to conduct diplomacy, circa 2018.

Illustration on Taiwan's contributions to world health by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Taiwan must be seated at the World Health Assembly

The constitution of the World Health Organization (WHO) notes that “the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition.” Yet WHO withheld, as last year, an invitation for Taiwan’s participation in May as an observer in the annual World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva, Switzerland.

Sale of Unmanned Aerial Systems to Our Allies Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A win for America and its allies

Our allies and partners want to “buy American.” They know U.S. industries produce the most technologically sophisticated and effective defense systems in the world. When our allies and partners are better equipped to defend themselves, there is greater regional peace and stability — and far less need for American service members to be in harm’s way.

Like Trolls to the Flame Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the patent system stronger

Appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week, the new director of the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO), Andrei Iancu, stressed his office’s focus on enhancing innovation through a strong, reliable and predictable patent ecosystem. All of us want a system that supports innovation by maximizing patent quality and minimizing patent granting mistakes. But how?

Illustration on fiscal responsibility and spending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Budget blame where it belongs

While tax cuts take the budget blame, spending does the debt damage. Proponents of big government spending are happy to stoke the latest story in the narrative that America is under-taxed.

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In this April 18, 2018 photo, President Donald Trump listens during a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump's private Mar-a-Lago club, in Palm Beach, Fla. The Democratic National Committee on Friday sued President Donald Trump's campaign, Trump's son, his son-in-law, the Russian Federation and WikiLeaks. The Democrats accuse the defendants of conspiring to help Trump win the 2016 presidential election after breaking into DNC computers and stealing tens of thousands of emails and documents. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Death to the inflation tax

There's new interest in indexing the capital gains tax to account for inflation. This is something good for everyone that conservatives have been pushing for years. The White House is working now to determine whether the president has the legal authority to make this change in tax policy by his own hand. There's evidence that he can.

Trump's foreign policy fix

Barack Obama spent eight years in the Oval Office hot seat convinced of his rectitude in all things big and small ("Trump seeks middle ground in foreign-policy balancing act," Web, April 18). Please forgive me if I do not join in the praise, especially on the foreign policy front. When Donald Trump became president we knew there would have to be a major cleanup on that aisle.

Humanism, Christ incompatible

Some argue that a "humanist" chaplain can effectively counsel a God-fearing Christian soldier. I would beg to differ "(Navy rejects 'non-theist' for chaplain corps; lawmakers warn against changing core mission," Web, March 27). A humanist believes that what humankind thinks is more important than what God wants us to do. This is the antithesis of Christianity. Christians attach prime importance to Christ, not man.

Why Trump will win in the end despite media loathing

It sometimes seems the only books being produced in Washington today are those competing to trash the current president. There was Michael Wolff's New York gossipy-nasty take on the Trump White House, published to the promotional cheers of the major media.

"The Obamacare mandate was held by the Supreme Court to be tax. Whatever philosophical positions you may have had before that, that's the law of the land," said Sen. Tom Cotton, Arkansas Republican, who led the effort to undo the individual mandate. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Obamacare repeal -- remember that? GOP doesn't

- The Washington Times

On Friday came this sad but true headline from The Hill: "GOP in retreat on ObamaCare." Another promise, another skate. Republicans, once the party of principle -- of law and Constitution and limited governance and conservatism of Founding Father ideals -- have simply morphed into red-tied Democrats.

In this Jan. 9, 2017, file photo, American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten speaks about education at the National Press Club in Washington. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File) ** FILE **

AFT teachers bully Wells Fargo on NRA -- citizens on 2nd Amendment

- The Washington Times

The American Federation of Teachers, an organization that popular thought would have in existence to press for teachers' rights in the classroom, has gone full blown political to tell Wells Fargo, in essence: Quit banking with the National Rifle Association. And since Wells Fargo won't, the AFT announced it's going to stop doing business with Wells Fargo.