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A page from a Gutenberg Bible. (The Washington Times) ** FILE **

The wounded printed page strikes back

- The Washington Times

Fake news is everywhere, cluttering desktops, iPads, laptops, iPhones and all the other manifestations of the post-literate era when it’s just too much trouble to find a reliable read.

Ambassador Faith Whittlesey poses Nov. 16, 1985 in Geneva, Switzerland. Representative diplomatic official spokeswoman. (AP photo/Michele Euler)

Remembering Faith Ryan Whittlesey

Early in 1983, an attractive young woman I did not know grabbed my sleeve as I was leaving a meeting on Central America in the White House Cabinet Room. She stuck her card in my hand. It read, “Ambassador Faith Ryan Whittlesey, Assistant to the President for Public Liaison.” On the back she had penned, “Call me! You need my help.”

Illustration on examining the FISA court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Questioning accountability on the secret court

Story after story comes out about the extent to which partisan politics played a key role in the Obama Department of Justice (DOJ), intelligence community and FBI during the 2016 presidential campaign. It’s especially so in the context of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, and the more recent suggestions of a “mole” or “spy” inside the Trump campaign.

Illustration on the effects of recent tax cuts by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why liberals hate the Trump tax cut

Despite liberal hysterics, Republicans’ recent tax cut raised top earners’ share of America’s tax burden. This seemingly “squared circle” is simply due to a fact true before the legislation and even truer after: Middle- and upper-income earners shoulder the overwhelming tax load. Equally obvious: Even so large a share is not enough for an insatiable left.

Illustration on Russia's history of state breaking by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s love affair with state-breaking

In Russia’s long-term war against the West that includes the infiltration of domestic political systems, blackmail and the indirect influence of elected officials through “ethnic political organizations,” one of its most prized and enduring tactics is its exploitation of ethnoreligious rivalries and fissures within the states along its borders.

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Illustration on the new royal couple by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Meghan Markle, the bride who can't save the world

It's not easy being a royal bride in Old Blighty. Even keeping up with what to call everybody, and whom to curtsy to, and whom to expect a curtsy from, requires an immersion course in protocol. We can't even call Meghan Markle by her real name.

Navarro needs rebuke

Political commentator and fake Republican strategist Ana Navarro not only once called President Trump a "man-baby," but in 2016 she tweeted: "Should Donald Trump drop out of the race? Yes. He should drop out of the human race. He is an animal. Apologies to animals."

Fewer lowering the flag

I don't know if I'm sad or angry. Some 20 to 40 years ago when our president ordered the American flag to half-mast, almost all flags were lowered in order to honor those the president was trying to honor. Today we are lucky if half the flags are lowered.

President Donald Trump speaks to the media before boarding the Marine One helicopter on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, May 23, 2018, en route to a day trip to New York City. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Slinging doubts about Singapore

The Democrats and their allied pundits are licking their chops at the prospect of supping on soup of bones from the collapse of the Singapore summit between President Trump and Kim Jong-un. Mr. Trump now rates the prospect of the summit even happening as no better than a toss of a coin.

A flawed book still worth reading

Yascha Mounk is a good writer and a bright Harvard University political scientist. While this sounds impressive, one should bear in mind that politics is not really a science. Instead, it is a bubbling cauldron of individual and group prejudices, loyalties, traditions, sentiments, interests and cultural forces that defies a purely scientific analysis.

Tom Wolfe in the 1980's   Associated Press photo

A luminary of language fades away

On May 14 a star failed to come out. Tom Wolfe passed away that day. With his passing the conservative movement lost its greatest social critic, and America lost one of its greatest novelists. As a writer Tom was his own man. He died as he lived, on his terms, or at least as much on his terms as a man can have it.