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Illustration on Gina Haspel's role in damaging the CIA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fixing a weakened espionage brand

A group of former senior intelligence officials recently published a letter supporting Deputy CIA Director Gina Haspel as the nominee to be the next CIA director.

President Donald Trump speaks at the Generation Next Summit in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Thursday, March 22, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

How immigration affects environmental policy

No one would mistake President Trump for an environmentalist. Yet his immigration policies could inadvertently safeguard the environment far better than any proposal from Greenpeace or the Sierra Club.

Illustration on the dangers of abolishing the Second Amendment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Second Amendment is here to stay

In a recent New York Times commentary, former U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice John Paul Stevens argued that the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution — the one that acknowledges the “right to keep and bear arms” — is a “relic of the 18th century.” Justice Stevens wants “a constitutional amendment to get rid of the Second Amendment” as a simple way to fight the National Rifle Association, which blocks gun-control legislation.

In this April 21, 2018, file photo, people watch a TV screen showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The signs read: "North Korea says it has suspended nuclear tests." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

A summit imperiled by Rocket Man’s travel tribulations

- The Washington Times

“Just getting there, as Cunard once boasted of transatlantic crossings by ship, “is half the fun.” The Atlantic is still there, but ocean liners are not, and almost the only way to cross the ocean sea now is by air. That’s no fun at all. Dining aboard an ocean liner has been replaced by dining aloft, and you’re lucky to get a pretzel or a stale cracker.

Illustration on the Syrian situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What’s next in Syria

Western civilization — in the guise of its three leading powers — struck back at international lawlessness when they hit Syrian chemical sites on April 13. It remains to be seen whether the strike had the desired effect of deterring the Syrian leadership from the further use of such weapons. If it does, President Trump’s claim of “mission accomplished” will be justified. That brings up the key question of “what next?” if chemical weapons use continues.

Related Articles

FDR underused quotas

An official of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum claims that "deep anti-Semitism" among the American public in the 1930s was to blame for the fact that America's immigration quotas were never filled, even as hundreds of thousands of Jewish refugees were fleeing Nazi Germany ("U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum opens exhibition on American response to Nazism," Web, April 22).

Tillman death still in vain

Last weekend marked the 14th anniversary of the friendly fire killing of Cpl. Pat Tillman, a football hero and man of honor who gave up millions of dollars in potential earnings to serve his country.

President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron embrace at the conclusion of a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, April 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

France remembers

Donald Trump's romance with Emmanuel Macron continued to blossom Tuesday when they planted a tree together on the White House lawn. The French president brought the sapling, a cutting from the European Sessile oak, with him from Paris.

This Tuesday, March 14, 2017, photo shows the Starbucks logo on a shop in downtown Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

Starbucks' other problem

- The Washington Times

Starbucks has a latte work to do to catch up with the competition when it comes to getting its drive-thru customers back on the road quickly.

Sex robots, bringing dysfunction to a community near you

- The Washington Times

For less than $2,000, men the world over can order and have shipped their very own handmade woman -- their very own artificially intelligence-responding, machine-programmed moving, software-generated moaning portable flesh-like robotic sex doll. Yep. They have to leave their dignity at the door, of course.

Former FBI Director James Comey is sworn in during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Thursday, June 8, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Comey's sworn testimony over keeping Congress in dark over Trump investigation doesn't hold up

- The Washington Times

Understand a key part of Comey's sworn testimony here. He said that the practice was to brief the Gang of Eight on "sensitive cases" on a quarterly basis. "Sensitive cases." Because, of course, if the FBI is engaged in a sensitive counterintelligence investigation, there should be oversight from the Legislative Branch so the Executive Branch is not abusing their power.

FBI Director Christopher Wray testifies during a House Judiciary hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, on oversight of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Claim: 71 percent of FBI's foreign counterintelligence budget diverted to Russia probe

- The Washington Times

Lt. Col. Tony Shaffer, a retired military intelligence officer and a Senior Fellow at the London Center for Policy Research says that over seventy percent of the FBI's current budget dedicated to foreign counterintelligence investigations have been diverted to support the probe's activities. Shaffer made the revelation on my radio program Monday afternoon on WMAL in Washington DC:

In this April 21, 2015, file photo, Kanye West, left, and Kim Kardashian attend the TIME 100 Gala, in New York. The couple married in 2014 and have three children. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

Kanye 'I love Trump' West breaks black rap mold

- The Washington Times

On the one hand, who cares what hip-hop star Kanye West thinks. But on the other hand, West is breaking the black rapper mold, not to mention Hollywood elitist bubble, by coming forward in support of conservatives and the First Amendment. And that's kinda significant and notable.