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Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, and Vietnam Communist Party General Secretary Nguyen Phu Trong, right, wave during a welcoming ceremony at the presidential palace in Hanoi, Vietnam Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017. (Hoang Dinh Nam/Pool Photo via AP)

The double-edged sword of China

A few weeks ago, Chinese President Xi Jinping offered a Soviet-style five-year plan for China’s progress at the Communist Party Congress in Beijing. Despite his talk of global cooperation, the themes were familiar socialist boilerplate about Chinese economic and military superiority to come.

Illustration on 529 savings accounts by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Giving families a helping hand with educational expenses

Putting four children through college would be a challenge for most families. Certainly it is for Jenny Clark and her husband, Michael, but they have made saving for their children’s college educations a priority.

Illustration on King Josiah hearing the reading of the law    The Washington Times

Rediscovering the Bible lost in America

There’s an Old Testament story that bears striking resemblance to what’s going on today in America. It’s the story of King Josiah finding the lost Book of the Law.

Former President Bill Clinton speaks at a gathering in Little Rock, Ark., on Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017, marking 25 years since his election. He and his wife Hillary Clinton appeared before about 2,600 people at the event in the Statehouse Convention Center. (AP Photo/Kelly P. Kissel)

The liberal ruse of feminism

Charlie Rose, formerly of PBS and CBS. Glenn Thrush of The New York Times. The collapse of the liberal establishment Masters of the Universe continues. Yet for some reason, the Democratic and liberal establishment think now is the time to condemn … Bill Clinton.

American Negotiations with North Korea Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Encouraging signs following Trump’s visit to Seoul

I was part of a small fact-finding delegation to South Korea immediately after President Trump’s Nov. 7-8 visit. The message we received in Seoul was universal: President Trump’s visit was a success; his presentation at the National Assembly was well-received. To a person, all were appreciative of the president’s comments, juxtaposing a vibrant liberal democracy in the South and an authoritarian and capricious regime in the North.

Volunteers tie the wooden cross that was carried through the streets of Etna, Pa., a Pittsburgh suburb, to the larger cross in the cemetery where their annual "Drama of The Cross," service was done on Good Friday, Friday, April 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) ** FILE **

America on fire, as love for God cools

- The Washington Times

America was built on Judeo-Christian principles, steered into existence by Founding Fathers who believed — yes, even the less religious ones — that this republic could not survive absent a moral, virtuous people. My, how wise the founders. That was then. This is now: Roy Moore. Al Franken.

Illustration on cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Closing the cyber skills gap

In the digitally integrated world we live in today, it’s nearly impossible to function successfully in any industry without making cybersecurity staffing a priority. No matter the size, no matter the sector, businesses all across the country are in growing need of professionals who specialize in cybersecurity.

Illustration of Bill and Hillary Clinton by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A tale of two cultures

“Prospect of New Special Counsel Rattles Justice” was the scary front-page headline on a recent, worried edition of The Washington Post. The faux fuss was caused by Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ suggestion that after weighing recommendations from senior prosecutors, he might appoint a special counsel to investigate Hillary Clinton’s role in the Uranium One deal.

Map of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Nagorno Karabakh

Losing the moral compass over Nagorno-Karabakh

When it comes to American foreign aid, it is often the message — rather than the dollar figure — that matters. A textbook case is Nagorno-Karabakh, the internationally recognized Azerbaijani territory, illegally occupied by Armenia.

Senator Al Franken   Associated Press photo

Back to the future with Franken

- The Washington Times

It’s already begun. Liberal activists and pundits are arguing that Minnesota Sen. Al Franken’s documented piggishness toward women should be discounted, forgiven or perhaps even ignored given the fact that he is, well, one of them.

Hillary and Bill Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Who knew so much testosterone rides the capital breeze?

- The Washington Times

These are not happy times for anybody. You can’t keep up with the serial sexual offenders without a scorecard, and the list grows longer every day and all the claims won’t fit on one scorecard. Seekers of cash settlements are advised to not take checks, and hurry to the bank and get in line before the cash runs out.

Related Articles

Left resents Trump's success

Why do the Democrats want to impeach President Trump? Is it because he wants to keep America free, strong and safe? Or could it be that his presidency has caused the stock market to boom, businesses to come back to our shores and job numbers to rise?

Bipartisanship needed on climate

Ben Wolfgang's coverage of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing on Nov. 15 ("Republicans, Democrats brainstorm on plan to reduce greenhouse gas," Web) was a breath of fresh air. It's just this sort of bipartisan deliberation, combined with an understanding of public-private innovation and initiatives, that will help us going forward. The work we have ahead of us cannot be something that one party, one sector or one nation can undertake.

Rediscovering the obvious by tripping over it

In his gushing review in The New York Times, left-wing journalist Ari Berman referred to the literary troika of E.J. Dionne, Norman J. Ornstein and Thomas Mann as "the wise men of Washington." For some of us who have observed them closely over the years, "Three Stooges" would have been more like it.

Value of Smart Phones Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The myth of growing income inequality

If your income remains constant but the prices of many things you buy decline, you are richer. There are many articles and books asserting that the inflation-adjusted incomes for the middle- and lower-income groups in the U.S. and some of the other developed countries have remained almost flat while the upper-income "rich" have seen a great rise in their incomes. Not true when correctly measured.

Illustration on volunteerism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Crowding out compassion

Anyone who has ever seen footage of a "Black Friday" stampede knows the holiday season can bring out the worst in people. So it's important to remember that it can also bring out the best — and to realize that government can inadvertently dampen our more compassionate impulses.

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y., center, arrives to speak to a large group of protesters rally against the Senate Republican healthcare bill on the East Front of the Capitol Building in Washington, Wednesday, June 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The season of the big slice

President Trump has something extra to be grateful for this Thanksgiving: a the long-awaited tax cut bill, passed by the House and en route to the Senate. As he marks the season with the traditional pardoning of the White House turkey, Republicans in line for similar clemency will get it only if the voters can find it in their hearts to forgive a plodding, inefficient (did someone say "incompetent"?) and lazybones Congress.

Back on the list of bad guys

You can't blame North Korea for playing American presidents for willing suckers. A succession of them applied for the job. President Trump didn't, and Monday restored North Korea to a deserved place of prominence on the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism.