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Former President Barack Obama. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Another day at work, another congressional tantrum

- The Washington Times

Throwing tantrums and shutting down the government is a bipartisan sport. Both Republicans and Democrats have now thrown this particular tantrum, like children fighting over a toy, and it’s great fun only for the tantrum-throwers. The rest of us, and that includes both Democrats and Republicans, are not much amused.

The Shutdown Schumer T-shirt Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

But it’s not the ‘Trump shutdown’

- The Washington Times

Even with the shutdown averted, Democrats continue to act as if they believe that no matter what they do, Republicans will get the blame, but reality is beginning to undermine their narrative.

In this June 21, 2017, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed-door meeting in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Mr. Mueller, shut down this sham investigation

- The Washington Times

It’s time for the Russia collusion investigation into President Donald Trump to come to a halt. It’s a sham; it’s a web of deceits. And the American people are just not that stupid that its continuance can be justified any longer.

Illustration on the need to reform Federal welfare programs by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why welfare needs reform

With Congress back in session, what’s one of the more controversial items potentially on 2018’s legislative docket? Speaker of the House Paul Ryan says welfare reform is in the cards.

A 100 percent U.S. Angus beef Colby Jack Cheeseburger as part of U.S. President Donald Trump set is seen at Munch's Burger Shack restaurant in Tokyo Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017. The cheeseburger Trump had during his recent visit to Japan is still drawing lines at the Tokyo burger joint. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

The ‘plant-based burger’ scam

Animal activist groups are making obvious headway convincing meat eaters to put down the steak, according to a GlobalData analysis that estimates as many as 6 percent of U.S. consumers currently consider themselves vegans.

In this Feb. 1, 2017, file photo, Brooklyn College students walk between classes on campus in New York. The New York state Legislature approved a budget on April 9, 2017, that includes funding for Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo's plan to offer free tuition for middle-class students at state universities. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Taming the tuition tiger

You can’t put a price on education, the saying goes, but if you did, it would be very high. And the cost falls on everyone.

FILE - In this April 11, 2017 file photo, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, center, signs a bill between Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, left, and House Speaker Michael Busch during a bill signing ceremony following the state's legislative session at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Md.  Lawmakers are poised to act early in the upcoming legislative session on two high-profile issues: paid sick leave and medical marijuana. The General Assembly gathers Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018.   Democrats, who control the assembly, are expected to make a priority of overriding Hogan's veto of paid sick leave for businesses with 15 or more employees.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

A New Year’s present for Marylanders

Most Marylanders agree that Maryland income taxes are too high. In various rankings we almost always fall into the category of the 10 worst states. For example The Tax Foundation ranks Maryland 9th highest in individual income taxes per capita; and the 2018 business tax climate index ranks Maryland among the 10 worst of the 50 states.

For several years, the resurgent oil and gas sector was almost the sole truly bright spot of the economy. (Associated Press/File)

Free markets and free trade will fuel U.S. energy dominance

To further capitalize on America’s energy renaissance, the Trump administration should reconsider and look to strengthen free trade — particularly with Canada and Mexico, our two largest energy trading partners.

Illustration on merit-based immigration policy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s merit-based immigration system

For decades, the American people have been begging and pleading with our elected officials for an immigration system that is lawful and that serves our national interest.

Tax Cut Balloons Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Lasting and transformative tax relief

A staggering 13 billion dollars. More than the value of the entire “Star Wars” franchise. That’s the minimum amount taxpayers will save under the recently-passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act now that lawmakers have made compliance with the U.S. tax code less of a chore. Taxpayers will now also save an estimated 210 million hours of time they used to squander on the clumsy 1040 “long form.” Lighter paperwork burdens like these will begin showing up in other portions of the tax code for businesses and individuals as the new law is implemented.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Jan. 22, 2018.

The Democrats’ fiscal trap

With all the talk about a possible government shutdown due to an impasse on immigration reform, no one seems to be paying attention to a story of even bigger long-term consequence. Congress is preparing a two-year budget that blows past bipartisan spending caps to the tune of $216 billion through 2019. These are the latest stunning tallies from an analysis by Congressional Quarterly. (See chart).

Former President Richard Nixon. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

An Olympian break in the war between the words

- The Washington Times

A few Ping-Pong balls broke the Cold War ice around China a generation ago, following Richard Nixon’s stunning trip to Beijing (when it was still called Peiping), and soon the United States and China were on their way to normal diplomatic relations.

Illustration on the recent nuclear alarm in Hawaii by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Hawaii error and liberal hysteria

Murphy’s Law was written to describe how governments work. It was proved yet again on January 13 when an employee of the Hawaii Emergency Management System sent a cellphone alert that said, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” The alert was false but until it was corrected almost 40 minutes later it terrified millions of residents and tourists.

Related Articles

Former FBI Director James Comey, FBI special agent Peter Strzok and special counsel Robert Mueller are shown here, left to right. On  Jan. 18, 2018, the House House Intelligence Committee voted along party lines to release a FISA abuse memo, which, according to sources close to the committee, addresses text messages between FBI agent Strzok and FBI lawyer Lisa Page which prove the so-called Steele dossier was used to justify FISA warrants.

FBI's curious and curiouser loss of Peter Strozk, Lisa Page texts

- The Washington Times

The FBI has lost about five months' worth of text messages that were exchanged between two staff members who share a common denominator: They are tied to the Russia collusion investigation of President Donald Trump -- and they're rabidly anti-Trump. Oh, and one more tie: They were having an affair. This doesn't look bad or biased at all, now does it? (Insert sarcasm here).

FILE - In this Jan. 16,2018 file photo, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy speaks before signing the first executive order of his administration in Trenton, N.J.  Funding for women's health and pay equity legislation will be the first bills Murphy pushes for, he said soon after taking over for Republican Chris Christie.  (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

Life in a petri dish

Democrats are highly selective in their condemnation of the "1 percenters." They're all for 1 percenters like New Jersey's new governor, Phil Murphy. He vows to steer the state sharply to the left.

'Outhouse of a country' would be better

It's hard to believe the amount of news coverage that is given to the non-news story about our president allegedly calling less-than-blessed countries s-holes. While there are enough witnesses claiming that he never said those words to make the story a non-starter, the coverage continues. Even though the president may have never said those words, those reporting those words obviously never heard of political correctness. No county should ever be referred to as a s-hole. The political correct phraseology is "Outhouse of a country." I suggest the news media refrain from the s-hole comments and use the politically correct terminology in the future.

It's Trump's economy, not Obama's

One year into the administration, the stock market is booming, jobless claims are the lowest since the Nixon era, consumer confidence is soaring and the raging question being debated by talking heads is who is mostly responsible for this historic resurgence: President Obama or President Trump?

Bonbons of the vanities

Tina Brown is a talented English journalist who has spent most of her celebrated career writing amusing things about grindingly trivial topics. While her professional highpoint was probably being named editor of the iconic New Yorker magazine, her time there was more remarkable for glitz than for substance.

Fox News host Megyn Kelly squared off with Former Navy SEAL and Trump supporter Carl Higbie on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. (Fox News screenshot) ** FILE **

Carl Higbie -- who? -- media's newest anti-Trump pawn

- The Washington Times

Carl Higbie, the chief of external affairs for the Corporation for National and Community Service, just resigned after CNN found evidence of offensive remarks he had made in the past. Never heard of Higbie? Doesn't matter. CNN found an audio of him in June 2013 saying this: "I just don't like Muslim people. Well people are like, 'well, you can't hate somebody just for being Muslim.' It's like, yeah, I can." Suddenly, in the eyes of the media, he's been one of Donald Trump's best friends for years.