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Illustration on the effects of recent tax cuts by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why liberals hate the Trump tax cut

Despite liberal hysterics, Republicans’ recent tax cut raised top earners’ share of America’s tax burden. This seemingly “squared circle” is simply due to a fact true before the legislation and even truer after: Middle- and upper-income earners shoulder the overwhelming tax load. Equally obvious: Even so large a share is not enough for an insatiable left.

Rep. Donna Edwards, Maryland Democrat, said the bill passed by the House Wednesday would punish federal employees, and amounts to union-busing.

Donna Edwards has put ambition ahead of principle

- The Washington Times

When Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland retired two years ago, Rep. Donna Edwards gave up her safe Prince George’s County congressional seat to take on her House colleague, Montgomery County’s Chris Van Hollen, in the Democratic primary. Ms. Edwards lost by nearly 13 points, in part because a supportive outside group ran a negative and wildly inaccurate ad in the final weeks of the campaign that backfired on her.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham, right, discusses his biography of former President George H. W. Bush with Bush's son, former President George W. Bush, Sunday, Nov. 8, 2015, at the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas. (AP Photo/Jeffrey McWhorter) ** FILE **

Jon Meacham, presidential historian, newest ‘Impeach Trump’ shill

- The Washington Times

Jon Meacham, a presidential historian who has a pretty impressive background, as far as writers go, anyway, took to national television to predict: Donald Trump will be impeached. Well, with all due respect to Meacham, his Pulitzer for a biography of Andrew Jackson, his executive stints at Random House and his many, many writing contributions to The New York Times and other left-leaning publications — he’s full of it.

Illustration on the EMP threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Short-circuiting the electromagnetic threat

Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) is a major threat to the continued existence of America. An enemy could destroy our nation simply by detonating a single nuclear weapon above the atmosphere over our country. All our enemies, including some terrorist groups, have, or can acquire, this capability. The electromagnetic pulse from this detonation would destroy our national electric power grid, and it would take many months or years to rebuild it. Without electricity, virtually all our everyday life-support systems would remain paralyzed, and millions would die of disease or starvation.

Illustration on the increasing viability of cryptocurrencies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward a better cryptocurrency

Why do people want “money?” Obviously, so they can buy goods and services now or in the future. But, in actuality, it is not money people want, but purchasing power. Is it necessary to have a stock of money to have purchasing power? Well no, provided people have credit or wealth that can be turned into a transferable unit of account in close to real time.

Sessions Oath Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The disingenuous genius of Jeff Sessions

It is no mystery that most who work inside the Beltway don’t like President Trump. He is an outsider and nationalist, while those on both sides of the aisle in Congress are globalists who listen more to their K Street providers than they do their constituents. The two new world dictators — Xi Jinping of China and Vladimir Putin of Russia — are confirmed nationalists, and while the former praises globalism for the benefits it has gained his country, both men want globalism, but only on their terms, not those of the West.

Illustration on Trump's effect on world political norms by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The new art of the deal

In a recent column, I spoke of the two current forms of populism and how they’re challenging the “Liberal International Order,” the governing philosophy that has guided the U.S. use of power in the service of freedom for ourselves and our allies since World War II. The question is, where does President Trump’s form of populism fit into what might be called the new version of the Liberal International Order?

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A shot from Tampa Bay Lightning center Cedric Paquette gets past Washington Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby for a first-period goal during Game 5 of the NHL hockey Eastern Conference finals Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Jason Behnken)

LOVERRO: Braden Holtby holds key to Capitals' fate

The Capitals can dominate, but are not dominant in the most important moments. The Capitals can play well, but they cannot sustain success. The Capitals are capable of winning, but seem far more comfortable folding. The answer? It's been the same since this round of the playoffs started -- Braden Holtby.

Illustration on Chinese pilfering of U.S. medical R&D by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Negotiating better trade agreements

President Trump is now hot and heavy in the trade negotiations with China, as well as Canada and Mexico in negotiating NAFTA 2.0. We are strong free traders, but we also believe that Mr. Trump's plans to negotiate better trade agreements that reduce trade barriers abroad are right on the mark. He also has to make sure those deals fully protect U.S. intellectual property, or what is commonly called know-how.

Illustration on Trump's Socratic method by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Donald Trump's Socratic method

While the press likes to portray President Trump as impetuous and impatient with details, when it comes to important decisions, he usually weighs options carefully.

University Goat Petting Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pursuing God, or petting goats

It is finals week at colleges and universities across the nation, and the University of Maine at Orono just announced a brilliant plan: It is providing a herd of goats for students to feed and pet in order to help them — presumably the students, not the goats — get through the stress of final exams.

Protecting the Power Grid Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A secure energy grid starts with copper

It's not hard to imagine the role that energy plays in our daily lives — in fact it becomes immediately apparent when we experience even a brief power outage in our home or workplace. Quite simply, it stops us in our tracks.

In this May 21, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, right, holds a bilateral meeting with Qatar's Emir Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al-Thani, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Trump sided with Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries Tuesday in a deepening diplomatic crisis with Qatar, appearing to endorse the accusation that the oil-rich Persian Gulf nation is funding terrorist groups. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Peace in the Middle East

Donald Trump isn't the first man to point out that life in the Middle East is built largely on a mirage of fantasy and resentment. But he is the first man in a long time to do something about it. Moving the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem is simply a long-overdue recognition of the reality that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel, and the Jews aren't going anywhere.

Trump's federal disclosure

"Trump met federal disclosure requirement by reimbursing Cohen for Stormy Daniels payment: Government" (Web, May 16) is generally factual. However, the piece implies that controversy remains about whether the disclosure under the 1978 Ethics In Government Act was timely.

Who wants that award, anyway?

Your 17 May editorial, "A bad week for Democrats," says President Trump is not likely to win the Nobel Peace Prize. That's a no-brainer, because he's even less likely to accept it. He wouldn't want his name sullied by association with the likes of Barack Obama, Jimmy Carter and Yasser Arafat. Knowing this, the Nobel Committee wouldn't embarrass themselves by doing the right thing.

Finding better angels, and becoming better

The United States has a problem. We have devolved into a mostly anti-intellectual country, instead now run by showmen and politicians and talking heads and hucksters who would rather look and talk of themselves on TV or Facebook or look into a camera than talk of freedom, liberty, wisdom, philosophy. Where the great minds went, we don't know.

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with law enforcement officials on the MS-13 street gang and border security, in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump doubles down on MS-13 as 'animals'

- The Washington Times

So President Donald Trump referred to MS-13 murderous gang members as "animals" -- and the left went nuts. Trump, to his great credit, laughed off the criticism and doubled down on his original comments.

A protester carries a sign down the street near a Planned Parenthood health center in the Van Nuys section of Los Angeles on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017. Several dozen protesters gathered in California's San Fernando Valley demanding the organization be stripped of its federal funding.  (AP Photo/Richard Vogel) ** FILE **

Trump's about to make pro-life camp very happy

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has a new proposal, and it's one that's going to make his Christian and evangelical base quite happy. He's set his sights on reeling in Planned Parenthood and abortion -- another campaign promise coming true.

Illustration on voicing the interests of American aviation workers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A voice for the American worker

Presidents are judged by how they stand up for the American people. Whether it is protecting U.S. jobs or safeguarding our industries and our jobs from foreign trade cheating, we expect our presidents to act in the best interests of Americans.

James Comey. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The collusion of lawyers is finally collapsing

- The Washington Times

Colluding, like canoodling, is all the rage. Robert Mueller, like a dog chasing his tail, has been trying for more than a year to find evidence that President Trump colluded with Vladimir Putin and the Russians to cook the 2016 election, which fate, providence, fortune and destiny decreed properly belonged to Hillary Clinton.

Illustration on obstacles to the Trump/Kim summit by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Trump-Kim summit meets a hurdle

The prospects of denuclearization talks between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un began to fade this week.

Illustration on fighting extremism in Algeria by Linas Garsys/The WAshington Times

Ending extremism with a just solution

When Abdelaziz Bouteflika was elected president of Algeria in 1999, it was at the height of a heinous civil war that carried the very seeds of division and radicalism that plague the whole of the Middle East/North Africa region today.

Bad Trade Deals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump's foreign policy is sound, but the economy gets shorted

President Trump recognizes U.S. foreign policy has for too long sacrificed economic interests and the livelihoods of ordinary working Americans for other important goals — spreading democracy, human rights and alliance building. And we are not getting our money's worth — our allies expect Americans to bear disproportionate shares of the costs and risks to military personnel of dealing with maelstroms created by Russia, terrorists in the Middle East, China in the Pacific and the like.

In this May 9, 2018, file photo, CIA nominee Gina Haspel testifies during a confirmation hearing of the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

Gina Haspel confirmed

In the end, the resistance didn't work. Despite much hemming and hawing, the nomination of Gina Haspel to be the director of the Central Intelligence Agency passed the Senate this week. The vote was 54 to 45, with six Democrats supporting her. Two of those Democrats are members of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Mark Warner of Virginia and Joe Manchin of West Virginia. Their support sealed the success of the nomination earlier in the week.