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In this Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson, file)

Drain the education swamp: College students’ tyrannical behavior must be stopped

How many conversations have we had with our friends, family and co-workers wondering what happened to the millennials? We expect a new generation to have new ideas and new ways of approaching the world. So how do we explain when a new generation is steeped in bullying, complaining about hurt feelings, demanding “safe spaces,” and using pride in fragile egos and weakened emotional states as the excuse to condemn free speech?

Illustration on China's role in diffusing the North Korean nuclear threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Nobody’s fool over North Korean nukes

Our news-hack kids — or, as Obama chief spinner Ben Rhodes called them, the “27-year-old know-nothings” — don’t have a clue as to the operative history of the North Korean nuclear threat to Asia, the Pacific and the United States.

Illustration on lawsuits harassing energy producers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Energy producers’ uphill battle against wealthy environmentalists

American manufacturing has been undergoing a tough transition for decades. Import competition and currency manipulation by other countries as well as regulatory excess at home have all taken a toll in many sectors of manufacturing. Just as manufacturing in America appears to be coming back, it faces a formidable new threat: a cabal of activists, cunning lawyers, ambitious politicians and a network of well-heeled benefactors.

Removing Government Intervention Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Protecting American business abroad

Westerners applaud the actions of the Trump administration to end the war on the West waged by the Obama administration, including: President Trump’s efforts to revitalize energy production from federal lands — oil and gas and coal; his dispatch of the Environmental Protection Agency’s land-grabbing “waters of the United States” rule; and his order to revoke, roll back or revise the national monument decrees with which President Obama placed millions of acres of federal lands off-limits to economic and recreational uses.

Secure Air Traffic Control Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Privatization with a potential for danger

Relieving the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) of its oversight of our nation’s air traffic control (ATC) operations would create significant concerns in both military and homeland security air defense mission areas. House Transportation Committee Chairman Bill Schuster has advocated relentlessly for ATC privatization, drafting and promoting two separate bills outlining the move to privatized control of the busiest airspace in the world. Endorsed by the Trump administration, this move has repercussions beyond the inherent conflict of interest presented by a commercial airline governing board.

Illustration on the changing attitudes toward good and evil in Star Wars by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Choosing favorites in ‘Star Wars’

On May 25, 1977, the original “Star Wars” movie, “A New Hope,” made its debut. It immediately had an impact that is hard to measure, especially on the generation that would, unfortunately, be called “X,” itself a seemingly sci-fi moniker.

Illustration on the growing threat of nuclear crisis with North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Discounting the North Korea threat countdown

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, speaking to the Reagan National Defense Forum on Dec. 2, offered up a doomsday prediction. When asked how close the United States and North Korea are to war, Mr. McMaster replied, “It’s increasing every day.” Sen. Jim Inhofe, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, seconded that statement in even more distressing language: “It is important for us here in the Senate to communicate to the American people the credible, grave, and immediate threat that we face . We don’t have the luxury of time.”

A detail of the baby Jesus is seen in a Nativity scene in the East Room during a media preview of the 2017 holiday decorations at the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Colleges push hard for Christ-free Christmases

- The Washington Times

College administrators around the country, it seems, are rushing to acquiesce to even the most minor of voices on campuses to make sure the “C” word — that’s “C” for Christmas, shhh! — doesn’t cause angst in some offended student’s ears. Basically, they’re driving hard to drive out the reason for the season, Jesus Christ.

Illustration on The Washington Post's treatment of Judge Roy Moore by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Molested by the media

You don’t have to be a fan of Alabama’s Republican senatorial nominee Roy Moore to see that the Furies in the media aren’t willing to cut him a break even when his most lethal accusers have been caught falsifying the record. The late Charles Manson seems to have gotten a more sympathetic press. For the past two months, the “Never Moore” media have tried to sink the judge by insisting his dating of teenage girls when he was in his 30s was scandalous on its face, even when they were of age, their mothers approved and the women themselves conceded he never engaged in sexual misconduct.

Illustration on Roy Moore's run for the Senate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Roy Moore and the politics of winning

It now looks as if Roy Moore, the Republican candidate for the Senate in Alabama, will win his race, despite the publicity about his alleged improper behavior with a 14-year-old girl 38 years ago, and maybe others young girls as well.

FILE - In this May 7, 2015, file photo, labor union members and supporters rally for better wages in New York. Nearly 2 million New York workers are unionized. New York's powerful labor unions are lining up against a constitutional convention, warning voters that opening up the state's main governing document could lead to the erosion of worker protections and rights such as collective bargaining. In November 2017, New Yorkers will be asked whether to hold a convention, where delegates would consider big changes to the constitution. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Reining in the worker center end run

Is it the beginning of the end for Big Labor’s henchmen? You’d be forgiven if you think I’m referring to the Hoffas. I’m actually talking about so-called worker centers, which have recently been the labor movement’s bludgeon — all while avoiding federal rules on union transparency and conduct.

Illustration on the risks of the Middle-East peace process by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good Luck, Jared Kushner

Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, and Jason Greenblatt, formerly one of the president’s real estate lawyers, are pursuing what the president calls the “ultimate deal,” a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. We should wish them luck because they’re going to need it.

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks to members of the media after a pipe bomb strapped to a man went off in a New York City subway near Times Square on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in New York. Mayor Bill de Blasio stands fourth from left. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

New York City terror, the 'new normal' for America

- The Washington Times

New York City was in rush-hour chaos Monday, as an ISIS-inspired terrorist detonated an improvised explosive device -- a pipe bomb affixed to his body with wire tie-type fasteners -- in the heavily traveled Port Authority Bus Terminal in Manhattan. And with that, officials started selling the idea that this is now part of American life.

Indianapolis Colts quarterback Jacoby Brissett looks to throw during the second half of an NFL football game against the Buffalo Bills, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, in Orchard Park, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jeffrey T. Barnes)

The NFL's Hail Mary

Faced with plummeting attendance and TV ratings over its boneheaded unwillingness to require its millionaire players to at least stand during the national anthem, the National Football League brain trust has come up with another beauty: Let's throw millions of dollars at left wing political causes.

Stained Glass Badge Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The courage to judge

The Washington Surgi-Clinic in Washington, D.C. is now on record saying that, for a modest fee, it will perform a late-term abortion on a healthy, viable baby boy or girl.

With the deadline looming to pass a spending bill to fund the government by week's end, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., meets reporters following a closed-door strategy session, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Tougher challenges than cutting taxes

Passing tax reform in record time will prove a significant accomplishment, but it pales by comparison to the challenges Republicans must tackle next.

FILE - In this March 2, 2014 file photo, movie mogul Harvey Weinstein arrives at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Two recent lawsuits have made the unorthodox legal argument that Harvey Weinstein's pursuit of young women, and his attempts to quiet sexual assault accusations, effectively amounted to organized crime. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

The risks of redress and reform

The attempt to redress and reform one of the great blots on American society, the use of authority in relationships to intimidate subordinates into granting sexual favors, seems to be reaching a crisis point, though the human condition probably guarantees that we will never run out of victims.

Armed police at the scene on Cromwell Gardens in London, after a car reportedly ploughed into people outside the Natural History Museum in London, Saturday Oct. 7, 2017. Police said a number of people were injured and one person was detained at the scene. (Victoria Jones/PA via AP)

Wolf whistler, be careful in Old Blighty

The bobbies will get you if'n you don't watch out. London's Metropolitan Police are considering whether to regard a wolf whistle aimed at a pretty girl (or even a plain girl with a great personality) as a "hate crime," to be treated as a serious breach of the law.

More Americans must reproduce

I am kind of lost when it comes to all this talk about a "baby bust," fertility and the declining birth rate ("On Rubio-Lee Amendment, Republicans missed chance to stem 'baby bust,'" Web, Dec. 7). I have heard arguments from several quarters as to the main reason, but my question is, Who is and is not having children?

Changing tide in politics?

Our country is in the midst of a civil war from which has grown a revolution. Truth be told — and it is being told finally — events such as ex-comedian Al Franken resigning from the Senate over the current and suddenly fashionable witch hunt are the least of the concerns of Democrats and even some Republicans.

In this July 6, 2017, file photo, former Sheriff Joe Arpaio leaves the federal courthouse in Phoenix, Ariz. (AP Photo/Angie Wang, File)

Go, Joe: Sheriff Arpaio eyes Sen. Jeff Flake's seat

- The Washington Times

Former Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio, the law enforcer who raised the hackles, to put it mildly, of the Eric Holder-esque social justice crowd, announced in an interview with The Daily Beast that he's seriously considering a run at Jeff Flake's Senate seat. Why not -- Jeff won't need it.

In this Aug. 18, 2012, file photo demonstrators display signs with crossed mosques during a protest in front of a mosque in Berlin, Germany. (AP Photo/Gero Breloer, file)

Germany, overrun, paying migrants to go home

- The Washington Times

Germany apparently is so overrun with migrants that government geniuses -- the same ones who opened the doors wide to mass migration in the first place -- are now paying them big bucks to take a hike and go home. So much for bleeding heart amnesty, yes?