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Illustration on Syrian strategic choices by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A mission quandary in Syria

Almost two weeks ago, after yet another incident of a chlorine gas attack by Syria’s Assad regime, Defense Secretary James Mattis warned both Syria and its Russian ally that using gas weapons against civilians or on the battlefield was very unwise. Last week, U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley was more blunt, warning that America is “prepared to act if we must” to stop indiscriminate bombings of civilians by the Assad regime.

Illustration on the legal and commercial rights of generic drug manufacturers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Big Pharma and its battle lines

- The Washington Times

It may be hard to believe, but some conservatives are arguing that any conservative who supports a measure before Congress called the CREATES Act that would allow generic drug makers under certain circumstances to go to court to get their competitors to play by the rules are ideological sellouts too willing to jump into bed with liberals and greedy trial lawyers.

Illustration on Rex Tillerson by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Tillerson exit, the Russian gambit

Fourteen months after he had become secretary of State, Rex Tillerson learned Tuesday that President Trump had fired him by sending out a public tweet.

How Hillary Clinton still misses the point

Woe are the Democrats. For generations now, they’ve been telling the American people that only they, and their cohort of liberals and leftists, understand and truly value women. Because of their special understanding of women, only they can be trusted to do what’s right politically for them, they tell us. Then came Hillary Clinton pulling the curtain back on that dangerously false narrative.

Illustration on Trump, Stormy Daniels and freedom of speech by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

President Trump and freedom of speech

When James Madison drafted the First Amendment — “Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech” — he made sure to use the article “the” in front of the word “freedom.” What seemed normal to him and superfluous to moderns was actually a profound signal that has resonated for 227 years. The signal was that because the freedom of speech existed before the government that was formed to protect it came into existence, it does not have its origins in government.

President Donald Trump meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Oval Office of the White House, Monday, March 5, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) ** FILE **

America’s love affair with Israel grows under Trump

- The Washington Times

The left likes to try to sell the line that the Palestinian Authority loves the Israelis, welcomes peace and wants nothing more than a harmonious agreement that allows both peoples to live side-by-side, in perpetual prosperity — oh yes, and that President Donald Trump’s announced move of the U.S. Embassy to Israel from Tel Avid to Jerusalem kills that plan. But apparently, the line isn’t selling.

A welder fabricates a steel structure at an iron works facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Monday, March 5, 2018. United States President Donald Trump has lobbed a grenade of uncertainty onto the NAFTA negotiating table, suggesting that tariffs on Canadian and Mexican steel are now dependent on whether the countries agree to a new trade pact. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP)

U.S. trade relations

President Trump made his mark as a businessman prior to occupying the Oval Office and he often gives his sales pitch for America: The country is once again open for business.

Broward County Schools' Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The slow learners of Broward County

Broward County, Florida, is a nice progressive place with a Democratic School Board and a Democratic sheriff. The county was living the South Florida dream until Valentine’s Day, when a homicidal maniac broke into one of its high schools and slaughtered 17 of its students and faculty, one of whom was an unarmed security guard and assistant football coach.

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Learn from Tillerson firing

Unfortunately the final statement of Rex Tillerson as secretary of state was an ill-concealed attack on President Donald Trump and his policies ("Tillerson urges State Department officials to forge ahead with 'integrity,'" Web, March 13). This was a case of two strong-minded men who had major differences in foreign policy, with both having little experience in the area. Mr. Tillerson's short stay brings to mind a variation on a familiar statement: Appoint in haste and fire at will.

The allure and alarm of Scandi noir

"The Sandman" is packed with isolated prisoners -- though they are not usually in a prison. One woman is buried alive for years in a coffin fitted with an airpipe so she can breathe. Others are stuffed in plastic barrels, also with airpipes that make their captivity a long-term affair. Two half-starved children are locked in an air raid shelter that's so dark they can see nothing.


It is time to say goodbye and good riddance to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). There are better ways to spend the $70 billion that SNAP receives. I don't believe the box-food program would work as a replacement, though. The poor and disabled who use SNAP would be better off using food pantries for their food needs.

Gregg Donovan, left, supporter of President Donald Trump holds a sign during a rally against a visit by President Donald Trump, Tuesday, March 13, 2018, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

Beverly Hills' best: Mexican-flag wavers demanding impeachment

- The Washington Times

The best and brightest that Beverly Hills has to offer went on full display just recently, as President Donald Trump touched down in Los Angeles for a Republican event. And by that, it's meant: Angry protesters waving Mexican flags and demanding impeachment took to the streets and waved around anti-Trump signs.

Illustration of Monica Lewinsky and Bill Clinton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

#MeToo, the Hillary and Monica edition

There is a growing debate on the left over whose side to take in the simmering controversy between Monica Lewinsky and Bill Clinton or the Clintons (plural), depending on how long Hillary remains loyal to Bill or, come to think of it, how long Bill remains loyal to Hillary. Truth be known, she might be in even hotter water than Bill at this moment.

Illinois Money Bag Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fleeing the Land of Lincoln

- The Washington Times

Illinois is many things, but no one in their right mind would move there and those unlucky enough to have been born there are moving out as fast as they can find jobs or move their businesses somewhere else. Some move as far away as Florida or Texas, but many others are content to simply haul their assets a few miles to Iowa, Wisconsin or Indiana.

Illustration on unity of the Coptic and Islamic faiths by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A pope and an imam

Pope Tawadros II had planned to spend last week on retreat in a monastery near Alexandria. But then Mohammed bin Salman, on a three-day visit to Egypt, asked to see him.

Illustration on potential Chinese AI dominance by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The final battleground with China

It takes technology to be a great nation, and President Trump's notable policy successes on corporate taxes and deregulation are not enough. He has to deliver on trade and investment with China or it will dominate artificial intelligence and the global economy

Illustration on North Korean denuclearization by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The denuclearization of North Korea

The diplomatic world has been shaken by President Donald Trump's stunning announcement that he will meet with the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un, to begin the process of denuclearization of the Hermit Kingdom.

In this Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018, photo, Rohingya refugees with their belongings arrive at the Balukhali refugee camp 50 kilometers (31 miles) from, Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. With the first repatriations of Rohingya refugees back to Myanmar just days away, and more than 1 million living in refugee camps in Bangladesh, international aid workers, local officials and the refugees say preparations have barely begun  and most refugees would rather contend with the squalor of the camps than the dangers they could face if they return home. It's unclear if more than a handful of Rohingya will even be willing to go home. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Refugee resettlement

When the Obama administration raised the refugee admission quota for fiscal 2017 to 110,000, New Jersey, Maine, Kansas and Texas formally withdrew from the resettlement program.

Overreacting to Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Overreacting to Trump

In 2020, Democrats must choose from two different paths: To be Bill Clinton or Barack Obama. Despite being the party's last two successful candidates, they are divergent. The correct choice is especially important to Democrats in need of a known route in order to avoid falling into the trap of overreacting to Donald Trump.

In this May 16, 2012, file photo, the Facebook logo is displayed on an iPad in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Social media's Trojan regulators

Hillary Clinton still can't believe she lost the election and is using her social media presence to call out those whom she feels were responsible for her loss. "We should all care about how social media platforms play a part in our democratic process. Because unless it's addressed it will happen again.

No peace without justice

A "peace treaty" between President Trump and "Glorious Leader" Kim Jong-un that ignores the human rights abuses in North Korea is meaningless. That issue must be addressed in any talks of peace.

Wind energy worth the birds

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is concerned about the number of birds killed by wind turbines ("Zinke says Interior should be a partner with oil companies," Web, March 6). However, Mr. Zinke might be surprised to know that the National Audubon Society "strongly supports properly sited wind power" as a way to address climate change. Proper siting means avoiding migratory pathways and environments that could harm endangered species.

Giving Ike and his accomplishments a second look

Academic historians are giving the presidential performance of Dwight D. Eisenhower a well-deserved second look, and the results show the contemporary political pundits who derided him were either biased or blind to his accomplishments.