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A page from a Gutenberg Bible. (The Washington Times) ** FILE **

The wounded printed page strikes back

- The Washington Times

Fake news is everywhere, cluttering desktops, iPads, laptops, iPhones and all the other manifestations of the post-literate era when it’s just too much trouble to find a reliable read.

Ambassador Faith Whittlesey poses Nov. 16, 1985 in Geneva, Switzerland. Representative diplomatic official spokeswoman. (AP photo/Michele Euler)

Remembering Faith Ryan Whittlesey

Early in 1983, an attractive young woman I did not know grabbed my sleeve as I was leaving a meeting on Central America in the White House Cabinet Room. She stuck her card in my hand. It read, “Ambassador Faith Ryan Whittlesey, Assistant to the President for Public Liaison.” On the back she had penned, “Call me! You need my help.”

Illustration on examining the FISA court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Questioning accountability on the secret court

Story after story comes out about the extent to which partisan politics played a key role in the Obama Department of Justice (DOJ), intelligence community and FBI during the 2016 presidential campaign. It’s especially so in the context of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, and the more recent suggestions of a “mole” or “spy” inside the Trump campaign.

Illustration on the effects of recent tax cuts by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why liberals hate the Trump tax cut

Despite liberal hysterics, Republicans’ recent tax cut raised top earners’ share of America’s tax burden. This seemingly “squared circle” is simply due to a fact true before the legislation and even truer after: Middle- and upper-income earners shoulder the overwhelming tax load. Equally obvious: Even so large a share is not enough for an insatiable left.

Illustration on Russia's history of state breaking by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s love affair with state-breaking

In Russia’s long-term war against the West that includes the infiltration of domestic political systems, blackmail and the indirect influence of elected officials through “ethnic political organizations,” one of its most prized and enduring tactics is its exploitation of ethnoreligious rivalries and fissures within the states along its borders.

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Illustration on USDA destruction of research kittens by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ending taxpayer-funded kitty cruelty

I am a cat person. Nothing against dogs or dog people. I like dogs, too. Growing up, my family always had both. But no one falls equally into both categories; everyone has a preference.

Israeli-Arab solution

What is wrong with the Arabs who have called themselves Palestinians since 1964, when the PLO was founded in Egypt to get rid of the "infidels" in the Middle East and North Africa ("Pending power vacuum: Younger Palestinians despair over aging, flailing leadership," Web, May 21)?

Veggies are safe barbecue choices

What happened to the good old days, when the worst things we had to fear on Memorial Day were traffic jams and indigestion? Folks planning to dust off their outdoor grills this holiday weekend face a nasty choice: If they undercook their hamburgers, hot dogs and chicken, their family and friends may face food poisoning by E. coli and salmonella, but if they raise the temperature to kill these bacteria, they run the risk of creating carcinogenic meat. (The U.S. Meat and Poultry Hotline advises raising the temperature when cooking, but our own National Cancer Institute warns that high-temperature grilling of processed meats produces cancer-causing compounds.)

Jim Thomas, Dr. Seth Cropsey, Ronald O’Rourke and Dr. Andrew Erickson, discuss the U.S. Asia-Pacific Strategic Considerations Related to P.L.A. Naval Forces Modernization in front of the House Armed Services Committee, in Washington, DC., Wednesday, December 11, 2013.  (Andrew S Geraci/The Washington Times)

The cost of not having a Merchant Marine

Freedom of the seas is critical to America's economic and political security, enabling the transportation of goods manufactured in the United States to other places around the world, and enabling Americans to obtain things otherwise unobtainable here, like bananas every day of every year. What would life be without the freedom to enjoy an occasional banana split?

Unveiling the evidence of an intelligent designer

"Time really does have a beginning." And, if time demonstrably has a beginning, then that argues for a Beginner. That profound claim is amply supported by astronomer Hugh Ross in the fourth edition of his accessible book "The Creator and the Cosmos: How the Latest Scientific Discoveries Reveal God."

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham, right, discusses his biography of former President George H. W. Bush with Bush's son, former President George W. Bush, Sunday, Nov. 8, 2015, at the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas. (AP Photo/Jeffrey McWhorter) ** FILE **

Jon Meacham, presidential historian, newest 'Impeach Trump' shill

- The Washington Times

Jon Meacham, a presidential historian who has a pretty impressive background, as far as writers go, anyway, took to national television to predict: Donald Trump will be impeached. Well, with all due respect to Meacham, his Pulitzer for a biography of Andrew Jackson, his executive stints at Random House and his many, many writing contributions to The New York Times and other left-leaning publications -- he's full of it.

Satchel Paige. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Mr. Mueller's fishing pole needs a rest

- The Washington Times

Satchel Paige, the legendary master of the sinking curve ball and famous doctor of philosophy, had a few wise words that Robert Mueller could use just now: "Don't look back, something might be gaining on you."

Rep. Donna Edwards, Maryland Democrat, said the bill passed by the House Wednesday would punish federal employees, and amounts to union-busing.

Donna Edwards has put ambition ahead of principle

- The Washington Times

When Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland retired two years ago, Rep. Donna Edwards gave up her safe Prince George's County congressional seat to take on her House colleague, Montgomery County's Chris Van Hollen, in the Democratic primary. Ms. Edwards lost by nearly 13 points, in part because a supportive outside group ran a negative and wildly inaccurate ad in the final weeks of the campaign that backfired on her.

Illustration on congressional Republican spending habits by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Republican fear factor

When President Franklin D. Roosevelt famously said, "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself," he could not have foreseen today's Republican Party.

Sessions Oath Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The disingenuous genius of Jeff Sessions

It is no mystery that most who work inside the Beltway don't like President Trump. He is an outsider and nationalist, while those on both sides of the aisle in Congress are globalists who listen more to their K Street providers than they do their constituents. The two new world dictators — Xi Jinping of China and Vladimir Putin of Russia — are confirmed nationalists, and while the former praises globalism for the benefits it has gained his country, both men want globalism, but only on their terms, not those of the West.

Illustration on the EMP threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Short-circuiting the electromagnetic threat

Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) is a major threat to the continued existence of America. An enemy could destroy our nation simply by detonating a single nuclear weapon above the atmosphere over our country. All our enemies, including some terrorist groups, have, or can acquire, this capability. The electromagnetic pulse from this detonation would destroy our national electric power grid, and it would take many months or years to rebuild it. Without electricity, virtually all our everyday life-support systems would remain paralyzed, and millions would die of disease or starvation.