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In this April 21, 2018, file photo, people watch a TV screen showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The signs read: "North Korea says it has suspended nuclear tests." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

A summit imperiled by Rocket Man’s travel tribulations

- The Washington Times

“Just getting there, as Cunard once boasted of transatlantic crossings by ship, “is half the fun.” The Atlantic is still there, but ocean liners are not, and almost the only way to cross the ocean sea now is by air. That’s no fun at all. Dining aboard an ocean liner has been replaced by dining aloft, and you’re lucky to get a pretzel or a stale cracker.

Illustration on the Syrian situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What’s next in Syria

Western civilization — in the guise of its three leading powers — struck back at international lawlessness when they hit Syrian chemical sites on April 13. It remains to be seen whether the strike had the desired effect of deterring the Syrian leadership from the further use of such weapons. If it does, President Trump’s claim of “mission accomplished” will be justified. That brings up the key question of “what next?” if chemical weapons use continues.

Unlocked from Poverty Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Unlocking America’s full potential

Thanks to tax reform, deregulation and America’s can-do spirit, our economy is strong. Unemployment is at its lowest level since 2000, wages are rising, and businesses are bringing jobs back to the United States. Despite these tremendous economic gains, we have yet to unlock America’s full potential.

Mike Pompeo. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democratic terror of a miracle in North Korea

- The Washington Times

Trying to spark a new romance, or even arrange a weekend tryst, is not always easy. It’s impossible with the help of spectators eager to throw things, not orange blossoms but sticks and stones with sharp edges. But that’s how Washington tries to conduct diplomacy, circa 2018.

Illustration on Taiwan's contributions to world health by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Taiwan must be seated at the World Health Assembly

The constitution of the World Health Organization (WHO) notes that “the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition.” Yet WHO withheld, as last year, an invitation for Taiwan’s participation in May as an observer in the annual World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva, Switzerland.

Sale of Unmanned Aerial Systems to Our Allies Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A win for America and its allies

Our allies and partners want to “buy American.” They know U.S. industries produce the most technologically sophisticated and effective defense systems in the world. When our allies and partners are better equipped to defend themselves, there is greater regional peace and stability — and far less need for American service members to be in harm’s way.

Like Trolls to the Flame Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the patent system stronger

Appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week, the new director of the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO), Andrei Iancu, stressed his office’s focus on enhancing innovation through a strong, reliable and predictable patent ecosystem. All of us want a system that supports innovation by maximizing patent quality and minimizing patent granting mistakes. But how?

Illustration on fiscal responsibility and spending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Budget blame where it belongs

While tax cuts take the budget blame, spending does the debt damage. Proponents of big government spending are happy to stoke the latest story in the narrative that America is under-taxed.

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Chinese President Xi Jinping talks with Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum Klaus Schwab during their meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Monday, April 16, 2018. (Naohiko Hatta/Pool Photo via AP)

Good news from the front

President Trump invited hoots of ridicule from the elites from coast to coast (though not so much from the Great Lakes to the Gulf) when he said "trade wars are good, and easy to win." Nevertheless, with trade tensions bubbling between the United States and the People's Republic of China, the Trump administration has notched a couple of significant triumphs. That's a good thing, because a rebalancing of the Sino-American trade relationship is all to the good.

Include Taiwan in WHA

There is no reason for Taiwan to be excluded from the World Health Assembly, and 23 millions people in Taiwan should enjoy the same health rights as people everywhere else in the world.

A love of linearity, with time that is not

In the very first sentence, Leda, the girl in the title of Jana Casale's debut novel, says "I'd like to read Noam Chomsky." But this idea is but one impulse among the many that throng Leda's mind "scattering like any and all moments of her life."

GOP should defend Trump, party

Republican members of Congress claim that the media is their greatest enemy. It is possible, however, that an equal or more important foe is their unwillingness to defend themselves and President Trump.

Robert De Niro opens Tribeca with rips of Trump: 'Lowlife-in-chief'

- The Washington Times

Robert De Niro, who used to be an actor of considerable weight but now seems more a deliverer of public jabs at President Donald Trump, tipped his has-been hat once again at the recent Tribeca Film Festival press luncheon, calling out the commander-in-chief as a "lowlife-in-chief" -- and that was just his warmup.

House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway, R-Texas, joined at left by Vice Chairman Glenn Thompson, R-Pa., announces the new farm bill, officially known as the 2018 Agriculture and Nutrition Act, at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 12, 2018. The bulk of the bill's spending goes toward funding SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Faith leaders skew Bible to oppose SNAP reform

- The Washington Times

Faith leaders are coming out in full force to oppose the Republican-sponsored Farm Bill released in the House that imposes stricter work requirements on those receiving food stamps. Do not be fooled by their so-called Christian arguments in opposition of this bill. Their arguments are neither Christian nor common sense.

The Barbara Bush I remember

- The Washington Times

From a first-floor window in the family's summer home on Walker's Point, Barbara Bush spied me standing bemused, shivering and overcoat-less.

The Return Of "Old-Fashioned" Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The return of the 'old-fashioned'

Call me old-fashioned -- and I've been called worse -- but do I sense the possible end to the sexual revolution, which exploded in the Sixties and whose fallout continues today?

Illustration on the FBI's reaction to Jim Comey's book    The Washington Times

The G-men and their emojis

Once upon a time in a previous century I was invited to watch a widely banned movie, "I Am Curious Yellow," in company with a number of FBI agents and officials to see just how naughty it was. I had written about censorship and whether the movie was over the line of decency.