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Illustration on the end of Net Neutrality regulations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Network neutrality comes to an end

They finally did it. After six months of debate, during which it received over 23 million public comments (of which half may have been fraudulent), the Federal Communications Commission voted on Dec. 14 to eliminate the network neutrality rules it imposed on broadband network operators during the Obama era.

Illustration on Hanukkah by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hanukkah, the first battle against transnationalism

Many think of Hanukkah as a fight for religious freedom. While religious freedom was at stake, it was part of a broader battle in behalf of the concept of national identity. The Maccabees, local Judeans who spearheaded the revolt against the overpowering northern Syrian Greeks, and who inspired the grass-roots, did so for the overarching cause of retaining Judea’s identity and Jewish character, which was under assault by those trying to denude Judea of its distinctiveness.

Illustration on global harmony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

People, planet and climate working together

Another year of weather is coming to a close. Even with some record-breaking snowfall from this past weekend’s storm in the eastern U.S., in many ways weather this year was not much different from any other year since the regular recording of temperature, precipitation and wind began across much of the globe 150 years ago.

Trump Administration Record on School Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping his promise about school choice

During the 2016 presidential campaign, candidate Donald Trump spoke passionately and often about school choice. Some school choice advocates, however, are beginning to rumble about the lack of progress on this key domestic policy promise. This grumbling has been building for some time among “talking heads” in the think-tank world.

Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off the stage with wife Kayla Moore after he spoke to supporters after an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. Moore didn't concede the election to Democrat Doug Jones. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

What Roy Moore’s defeat portends

There were plenty of reasons why Republican Roy Moore’s defeat in the scandal-plagued Alabama election was a blessing for the GOP, despite losing a seat in a closely divided Senate.

Illustration on the GOP and the death penalty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Republicans reconsidering the death penalty

The mere idea of Republicans sponsoring death penalty repeal bills in great numbers was once considered an unlikely notion. However, Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty recently released a report revealing how Republicans are championing measures to end capital punishment at never-before-seen rates.

Doug Jones is greeted by a supporter before speaking during an election-night watch party Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. Jones has defeated Republican Roy Moore, a one-time GOP pariah who was embraced by the Republican Party and the president even after facing allegations of sexual impropriety. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Doug Jones — and Trump’s life just got a lot harder

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has been beating a dead horse in Congress for almost a year now, trying to pass his agendas legislatively through a Senate that’s dominated by Republicans yet consistently falls to Democratic Party will because of an ever-looming threat of filibuster. It’s only going to get tougher for Trump. Prepare for the stalled and even dropped legislation.

Illustration on Iranian influence in the Persian Gulf region by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s indirect strategy for regional influence

Last month, Yemen’s Houthis, the Iranian-supported rebel faction that now dominates the southern Persian Gulf’s most volatile state, fired a ballistic missile that came close to the Saudi capital, Riyadh, before being intercepted by the country’s military. The incident was a clear sign of the deepening sectarian conflict between Tehran and Riyadh now taking place throughout the Middle East. But it was also an accurate reflection of the sort of asymmetric tactics being prioritized by Iran in its strategy for regional dominance.

An open process for revamping net neutrality

While the pall of scandals and alleged scandals in the nation’s capital may have many voters thinking of the Beltway as a dysfunctional wasteland, the reality is that much of the machinery of government is, in fact, going full throttle trying to create jobs and spur growth. Only you wouldn’t know it from the daily news cycle.

Invisible Political Hand Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The invisible hand of economics

The invisible hand of American presidential politics is economics. Almost imperceptibly guiding the electorate, no other issue is as determinant of a presidency’s success. Currently, it is supporting Donald Trump through his political problems and could push him to re-election, as it has so many others.

In this Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson, file)

Drain the education swamp: College students’ tyrannical behavior must be stopped

How many conversations have we had with our friends, family and co-workers wondering what happened to the millennials? We expect a new generation to have new ideas and new ways of approaching the world. So how do we explain when a new generation is steeped in bullying, complaining about hurt feelings, demanding “safe spaces,” and using pride in fragile egos and weakened emotional states as the excuse to condemn free speech?

Illustration on China's role in diffusing the North Korean nuclear threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Nobody’s fool over North Korean nukes

Our news-hack kids — or, as Obama chief spinner Ben Rhodes called them, the “27-year-old know-nothings” — don’t have a clue as to the operative history of the North Korean nuclear threat to Asia, the Pacific and the United States.

Related Articles

The success of faith-friendly media

The relationship between the "church" and the "media" has been a strange and storied one from the beginning -- going from patronage to protest and back again.

'In the room where it happens'

In the Broadway megahit "Hamilton," Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison meet together to decide on foundational policies that would still have major ramifications today... and all behind closed doors.

Behind the lines: The rise of Christians in Hollywood

When I first arrived in Hollywood after college in 1976, it was tough finding anyone who would admit to being a Christian. Christians were here, but they were hidden away and rarely heard. With few exceptions, the pattern was predictable: If they were concerned about their job, they kept quiet about their faith. If they were at the top of the industry, they felt a bit more free to express their convictions. But only those retired or near the end of their careers felt the confidence actually "to come out" as believers.

Not-so-strange bedfellows in media

The Lone Ranger would have been proud. Appearing out of nowhere but just in the nick of time 12 years ago, a modern-day crusader helped others breathe a sigh of relief. His assistance has since morphed into an important friendship, and a working relationship between conservative Christians and Orthodox Jews.

President Donald Trump shakes hands with French President Emmanuel Macron during a meeting at the U.S. Embassy, Thursday, May 25, 2017, in Brussels. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The ambassador tweets his mind, not unlike...

- The Washington Times

Some high-ranking Republicans told me they briefly considered snubbing a French Embassy Christmas party Wednesday after Amb. Gerard Araud tweeted -- then quickly deleted - an accurate but ill-timed observation about U.S. history.

In this Jan. 28, 2016, file photo, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee walks onto the stage before a Republican presidential primary debate in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

Mike Huckabee on non-conceding Roy Moore: 'Best to exit with class'

- The Washington Times

Mike Huckabee, former Arkansas governor and presidential hopeful, sent a pretty blunt message Roy Moore's way Wednesday, telling the failed Senate candidate it was well past time to concede. "Roy Moore won't concede; says will wait on God to speak," Huckabee tweeted. "God wasn't registered to vote in AL but the ppl who voted did speak and it wasn't close enough for recount." Quite right.

In this July 24, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks about health care in the Blue Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

Trump's right -- by the numbers, media hate him

- The Washington Times

A new study showed that in September, October and November, almost 91 percent of remarks from reporters' and other so-called non-partisan-types' mouths during evening ABC, NBC and CBS broadcasts were anti-Trump in nature. Ninety-one percent. That's pretty dang significant. That's an outright media blitz -- a war even.

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at the end of an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. Moore didn't concede the election to Democrat Doug Jones. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

Roy Moore loss not a commentary on Donald Trump

- The Washington Times

Roy Moore may have denied all the sexual misconduct and harassment charges that plagued his long and dark campaign -- but apparently, voters couldn't move past the shadows, and Democrat Doug Jones won. Democrats are no doubt poised to spin the Moore loss as some sort of stunning commentary on President Donald Trump. But that'd be folly.

Illustration on the changing attitudes toward good and evil in Star Wars by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Choosing favorites in 'Star Wars'

On May 25, 1977, the original "Star Wars" movie, "A New Hope," made its debut. It immediately had an impact that is hard to measure, especially on the generation that would, unfortunately, be called "X," itself a seemingly sci-fi moniker.

The revolution eats its own

As I ponder the lengthening list of alleged sexual offenders drawn from Hollywood, the arts, the media and politics, I am moved to wonder why the overwhelming majority of the accused are prominent luminaries of the left. Those accused on the right claim utter innocence, including Bill O'Reilly, who nonetheless paid out a fortune to accusers — go "figah," as they say in Brooklyn. At any rate, the lefties constitute the growing multitude.

Illustration on the Mueller investigation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When Trump associates won't 'co-operate'

- The Washington Times

Robert Mueller, like virtually every special prosecutor or independent counsel preceding him, has embarked on what amounts to a witch hunt that will allow him to brag when it's over that he indicted a bunch of those he went after — even if he never manages to unearth any evidence that the Trump campaign "colluded" with the Russians.