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Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Gropergate! The halls of Congress under siege!

- The Washington Times

When I was a young reporter on a certain newspaper in the South, fresh on a new job, I took a fancy to a sweet and pretty young woman (that’s how we talked in those days) working on what newspapers quaintly called “the Society pages.”

Why Trump should arm Ukraine

President Trump has often expressed his desire to build a better, more positive relationship with Russia. However, as Secretary of State Tillerson has said, improved bilateral relations will not be possible without ending Russia’s aggression against Ukraine.

Illustration on the restoration of the Alamo by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Restoring, reinforcing and remembering the Alamo

As a native Texan, as a veteran, and as Texas land commissioner, it is my solemn duty and my great honor to be the caretaker of the Alamo. Who we are as Texans started there and who we can be as Texans and Americans still lives there.

Illustration of George Papadopoulos by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Russian shadow

Thank goodness we live in a country where the people who represent us in Congress have the power to investigate and grill federal officials to root out wrongdoing in our government.

Illustration on Brett McGurk by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Following Obama’s footsteps toward Kurdistan’s destruction

Brett McGurk, an Obama appointee serving under President Trump, is working in order to ensure that the United States continues to follow Barack Obama’s failed Iraq policy even though the U.S. now has a Republican president.

United Nations U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley, right, listens as Organization of American States Secretary General Luis Almargo speaks during a U.N. meeting on human rights concerns in Venezuela, Monday Nov. 13, 2017, at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Nikki Haley quite rightly rocks U.N. boat on Venezuela

- The Washington Times

Human rights matter — that’s the message a resolute U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley just sent the Security Council’s way, reminding that Venezuela, land of the socialists, shouldn’t be allowed to skate on civil abuses. This is why Haley rocks. She’s unafraid to take the high ground on behalf of America, even when world players disapprove.

Illustration on the sexual vulgarization of the American culture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the cheap and dirty loses its punch

In the high-tech world of social media, where fake news thrives with the real, we’ve become a nation of voyeurs and eavesdroppers. Consuming the salacious is the guilty pleasure. We see and overhear a broad range of sordid comings and goings, what we used to describe quaintly as “dirty,” in the vocabularies that were once reserved for private conversations between close friends, too embarrassing for general discussion.

Illustration on CFPB by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The ‘Equifax’ threat to small-dollar loan customers

There are many flaws in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) small-dollar loan rule, which will deny millions of Americans access to a vital form of credit. One of the biggest problems, which has become an acute problem lately, is the security of consumers’ personal financial information.

When Republicans promise but don’t deliver

Voters in New Jersey and elsewhere just sent a message to President Trump and congressional Republicans: Deliver or expect to get replaced, and planned tax cuts will hardly be enough.

Illustration on a peace initiative in the form of an international research vessel for the South China Sea               The Washington Times

Using science diplomacy in the South China Sea

Despite White House efforts to deny well-established climate change reports and U.S. withdrawal from the 2015 Paris Climate Accord, most might question the wisdom of laying down a science — led peace-building plan in the contested South China Sea disputes. Yet science may prove to be the linchpin for bringing about cooperation rather than competition not only among the claimant nations in the region but also between Washington and Beijing. While President Trump’s recent offer to Vietnam’s President Tran Dai Quang to mediate the complex and challenging disputes over access to fish stocks, conservation of biodiversity and sovereignty claims caught many observers by surprise, it should not have.

Investigation into the Investigation Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More Chronicles of Hillary

The Department of Justice will soon commence an investigation to determine whether there should be an investigation (you read that nonsense correctly) of a scandal involving the Clinton Foundation and a company called Uranium One. It appears that FBI decisions made during the time that Hillary Clinton was being investigated for espionage will also be investigated to see whether there should be an investigation to determine whether she was properly investigated. (Again, you read that nonsense correctly.)

In this Oct. 17, 2017, file photo, Army soldiers hone their long-distance marksmanship skills as they train at Fort Benning in Columbus, Ga. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Filling military quotas with the mentally ill

The Army very quietly announced in August that it will lift a ban on waivers allowing people with a history of mental health issues, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, to join their ranks. Even in normal times this should concern you greatly, let alone when the world appears to be preparing for war.

Illustration on the campaign against glyphosphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forcing taxpayers to fund anti-chemical activism

It’s bad enough when tax-exempt foundations and activist groups use junk science and scare campaigns to promote excessive regulations and set the stage for class action lawsuits against perfectly good products. It’s intolerable when our tax dollars directly finance U.S. and European Union government agencies that do likewise.

Illustration on the criminalization of government agencies by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The criminalization of America’s government agencies

The criminalization of government agencies by the Obama administration was far more extensive than previously realized. The Uranium One deal is a prime example of how key government agencies have been criminalized.

Related Articles

Illustration on the antiquated Communucations Act of 1934 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why America needs an updated Communications Act

Congress needs to update the Communications Act of 1934. In 2014, Republican Reps. Fred Upton and Greg Walden started a congressional review process, using the #CommActUpdate handle. Now almost four years later, it's time for Congress to get the job done by overhauling the statute in a way that constrains the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) authority to substitute burdensome bureaucratic mandates for marketplace freedom.

Illustration on nostalgia for Communism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Came the revolution

My political orientation has evolved slowly over decades. With one exception: I became anti-Soviet and anti-Communist overnight. More quickly than that, actually.

Target of the Democrats Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Roy Moore and the migraine for Republicans

It has long been my conviction that Democrats are the more adept pols, the most tireless pols, the most political pols. I have said that their political libido is that of a nymphomaniac. By that I mean to compliment them, at least to compliment their political skills. The political libido of the Republicans is by comparison the political libido of a Victorian lady, complete with white gloves and parasol.

FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington, at sunset. The Supreme Court is making new legal filings available online starting Monday, years behind the rest of the federal court system. Its a big step forward for an institution that has sometimes had just a glancing familiarity with technology. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

California and the Constitution

There's a lot about the law and the Constitution that California does not understand, particularly the First Amendment. The U.S. Supreme Court, perhaps willing to offer the needed tutorial in the law, has agreed to hear a legal challenge to a California law requiring private pro-life pregnancy counseling centers to tell their clients that the state will provide an abortion instead.

President Trump has undermined the judiciary by using his pardon powers on former Sheriff Joe Arpaio and has hurt the First Amendment by berating news outlets or calling them "fake," according to some of the Democrats' articles of impeachment. (Associated Press/File)

Home, with a side of bacon

President Trump is home from the hill, and Thanksgiving isn't far away, but the only words of gratitude from the liberals and the harder left is, "Thanks for nothing." That's all the president gets from his sore-loser critics following a whirlwind diplomatic and deal-making excursion through Asia. When they lock their partisan opposition in concrete and vow never to say an encouraging word, Americans are reminded why they voted to "Put America first."

Don't write Moore off yet

If Republican Senate nominee Judge Roy S. Moore sexually abused four women and one was only 14 years old at the time, he should withdraw from the U.S. Senate race immediately. But that's a big "if." After being silent for more than 30 years — during which time Mr. Moore ran for many offices — these women are accusing Mr. Moore now, when it is too late under Alabama law for another Republican to be put on the ballot. If he withdraws, the election of a Democrat is guaranteed. That smells.

Left's gun fix makes no sense

Many liberals and the Democratic Party like to insult Christians and our belief in God, Jesus Christ and prayer ("Mocking prayer after the massacre," Web, Nov. 8). The political left's God truly is big government and self-adoration.

A former James Bond says goodbye

Although I much prefer Sean Connery's dark and dangerous portrayal of Ian Fleming's iconic character James Bond to Sir Roger Moore's light and comedic approach, I was a huge fan of Mr. Moore's portrayal of Leslie Charteris' Simon Templar in the 1960s TV series "The Saint."

U.S. Capitol

Congressional talks on sex harassment boil with hypocrisy

- The Washington Times

Come on, now. A House committee on Capitol Hill is holding a hearing on sexual harassment, to discern what policies, going forward, ought to be implemented to stop sexual harassment? And what's that you say, Lassie -- the Senate side of things just passed a resolution that makes clear members, staff and even interns have to attend training on how to steer clear of sexual harassment?

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., smiles as he questions Facebook's General Counsel Colin Stretch, Twitter's Acting General Counsel Sean Edgett, and Google's Law Enforcement and Information Security Director Richard Salgado, as they testify during a Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2017, on more signs from tech companies of Russian election activity. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) ** FILE **

Jeff Flake: I'll back a Democrat over Roy Moore

- The Washington Times

Sen. Jeff Flake, the retiring Arizonan Republican -- the one who recently penned a book that contained sharp criticisms of President Donald Trump and the direction this commander-in-chief was taking the GOP -- said he'd back a Democrat before voting for Roy Moore. Sigh.

In this Monday, Nov. 6, 2017, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump feeds carps with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe before their working lunch at Akasaka Palace in Tokyo, Japan. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP, File)

The myth of the Republican exodus

- The Washington Times

There's a lot of media talk lately about all the Republicans who are leaving office, refusing to seek re-election, resigning for some new venture or another -- and the talk of the town is that these pols are leaving in some sort of mixture of disgust, horror and sadness at the direction the party's taking, post-President Donald Trump. But this is a bit of faked news.

U.S. President Donald Trump arrives for a family photo during the ASEAN-U.S. 40th Anniversary commemorative Summit in Manila, Philippines, Monday, Nov. 13, 2017. (Manan Vatsyayana/Pool Photo via AP)

Coming home from an Asian tutorial

- The Washington Times

No one should be rude. Bad manners are not nice. Doesn't everybody's mama teach him that? Donald Trump certainly knows how to overdo it, but sometimes a president must be strategically rude to make a necessary point.