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Rebecca Hagelin

The ‘holiday’ is Christmas

Just as the Jewish people and so many gentiles missed the true Jesus at the time of his life on earth, America as a “Christian nation” misses Jesus today.

Cutting Through Obama Red Tape Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump’s year in review

On Thanksgiving Day, President Trump took to Twitter to remind Americans how much they had to be thankful for during his first year in office, citing a soaring stock market, a “record” cut in regulations, and the “lowest unemployment in 17 years.” Was the president’s self-issued report card accurate?

Illustration of the Mississippi Gopher Frog by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘The Case of the Missing Frog’

Sherlock Holmes it isn’t. But Weyerhaeuser v. United States Fish and Wildlife Service, a case seeking review by the Supreme Court, could be called, “The Case of the Missing Frog.” In this amphibian equivalent of an Arthur Conan Doyle mystery, the government seeks to seize control of land it does not own, to protect an endangered species of frog that does not live there, force private landowners to tear down a healthy native forest, and install at landowner expense a new forest the landowner does not want.

Mirror Tax Cut Plans Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What John F. Kennedy and Donald Trump have in common

Last week during an address at the White House President Trump likened his tax plan to “the tax cut that John F. Kennedy proposed 55 years ago.” This elicited some howls of protest from Mr. Trump’s liberal critics who say it’s historically inaccurate to compare the Trump plan to JFK’s.

Illustration on the hopes generated by Christmas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Always winter but never Christmas

In C.S. Lewis’ “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,” there is a scene where we find the children standing fearful and confused in a land that is frozen and nearly lifeless. A lamppost stands somberly in a windless forest that is blanketed with snow and the few creatures the children do encounter are frightened and paranoid.

Illustration on the end of Net Neutrality regulations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Network neutrality comes to an end

They finally did it. After six months of debate, during which it received over 23 million public comments (of which half may have been fraudulent), the Federal Communications Commission voted on Dec. 14 to eliminate the network neutrality rules it imposed on broadband network operators during the Obama era.

Illustration on Hanukkah by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hanukkah, the first battle against transnationalism

Many think of Hanukkah as a fight for religious freedom. While religious freedom was at stake, it was part of a broader battle in behalf of the concept of national identity. The Maccabees, local Judeans who spearheaded the revolt against the overpowering northern Syrian Greeks, and who inspired the grass-roots, did so for the overarching cause of retaining Judea’s identity and Jewish character, which was under assault by those trying to denude Judea of its distinctiveness.

Illustration on global harmony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

People, planet and climate working together

Another year of weather is coming to a close. Even with some record-breaking snowfall from this past weekend’s storm in the eastern U.S., in many ways weather this year was not much different from any other year since the regular recording of temperature, precipitation and wind began across much of the globe 150 years ago.

Trump Administration Record on School Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping his promise about school choice

During the 2016 presidential campaign, candidate Donald Trump spoke passionately and often about school choice. Some school choice advocates, however, are beginning to rumble about the lack of progress on this key domestic policy promise. This grumbling has been building for some time among “talking heads” in the think-tank world.

Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off the stage with wife Kayla Moore after he spoke to supporters after an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. Moore didn't concede the election to Democrat Doug Jones. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

What Roy Moore’s defeat portends

There were plenty of reasons why Republican Roy Moore’s defeat in the scandal-plagued Alabama election was a blessing for the GOP, despite losing a seat in a closely divided Senate.

Illustration on the GOP and the death penalty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Republicans reconsidering the death penalty

The mere idea of Republicans sponsoring death penalty repeal bills in great numbers was once considered an unlikely notion. However, Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty recently released a report revealing how Republicans are championing measures to end capital punishment at never-before-seen rates.

Doug Jones is greeted by a supporter before speaking during an election-night watch party Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. Jones has defeated Republican Roy Moore, a one-time GOP pariah who was embraced by the Republican Party and the president even after facing allegations of sexual impropriety. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Doug Jones — and Trump’s life just got a lot harder

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has been beating a dead horse in Congress for almost a year now, trying to pass his agendas legislatively through a Senate that’s dominated by Republicans yet consistently falls to Democratic Party will because of an ever-looming threat of filibuster. It’s only going to get tougher for Trump. Prepare for the stalled and even dropped legislation.

Illustration on Iranian influence in the Persian Gulf region by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s indirect strategy for regional influence

Last month, Yemen’s Houthis, the Iranian-supported rebel faction that now dominates the southern Persian Gulf’s most volatile state, fired a ballistic missile that came close to the Saudi capital, Riyadh, before being intercepted by the country’s military. The incident was a clear sign of the deepening sectarian conflict between Tehran and Riyadh now taking place throughout the Middle East. But it was also an accurate reflection of the sort of asymmetric tactics being prioritized by Iran in its strategy for regional dominance.

Related Articles

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks as his wife Kayla Moore looks on at the end of an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

Good news in Alabama for everybody

Roy Moore leaves the stage with a gift for both Republicans and Democrats. The Republicans won't have to share the stage with him ever again, and the Democrats, who tried and failed to win even one of a succession of special elections this year, have finally got what they couldn't get on their own.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gestures as he talks during the closing news conference following the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation's Extraordinary Summit in Istanbul, Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017. Muslim nations of the 57-member Organisation of Islamic Cooperation are rejecting U.S. President Donald Trump's declaration of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, and appear set to counter it with a declaration of east Jerusalem as the capital of a future Palestinian state. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)

Turkey's tantrum

The ability to respond smartly to controversy is a measure of responsible leadership. Turkey's Recep Tayyip Erdogan just flunked a test. The Turkish president-cum-caliph with a tart tongue has flown off the handle over the U.S. foreign policy turn toward Israel, demonstrating why he is an unreliable ally. Eliminating common ground undermines the basis for friendship.

Hollywood the ultimate in hypocrisy

There is no shame in Hollywood. It is not enough that we are in the midst of an avalanche of sexual-predation revelations, but now Hollywood is pouring accolades and rave reviews on "Call Me By Your Name," a film that depicts the sensual affair between a 17-year-old boy and 24-year-old man ("Acclaimed film of boy-man love raises hackles in Hollywood," Web, Dec. 12). There is even talk of an Academy Award nomination for best picture, and the film has garnered three Golden Globe Awards nominations.

Undermining Japanese morale in World War II

Black propaganda is one of the more ticklish weapons of the intelligence profession. Put simply, it means lying to an adversary to attack the morale not only of his battlefield fighters, but also his supporters back home -- which means civilians.

Jerusalem move a win for democracy

The Second Intifada, started in 2000, saw the murder of 1,000 Israelis and the self-defense killing of 3,000 Arab terrorists attempting to butcher Israeli civilians. PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat planned the intifada before going to Camp David to meet President Bill Clinton and then Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak. Though they got everything they claimed they wanted (to the West, anyway), Arafat feared that signing an 'end-of-conflict clause' would lead to his death. So he went home and launched his suicide bombers.

Introducing "Turbulent," Parables' latest original production

Hollywood and the mainstream media have put aside faith-based and wholesome entertainment way too often, making it difficult for viewers to have access to quality films and TV content that encourages faith and elevates family values.

Mastermedia ThirtiethAnniversary, honoring Larry Poland and installing Dan Rupple.

Media's persistent Christophobia

On July 16, 1988, Hollywood and American media changed forever. On this day, Lankershim Boulevard, which connects Universal Studios to the freeways, was not just busy, it was gridlocked. Some 25,000 people had gathered outside the gates of the studio in the largest protest in the history of Tinseltown.

A new 'home' for faith-based content

I've never understood the divide between the Hollywood studio system and the faith-based film world more than in the past year or so.

Christians, Hollywood and my refrigerator magnet

I've discovered that since the beginning of the motion picture industry, the relationship between the Christian church and Hollywood has been marked by distrust and suspicion. In the early years, many Christians regarded Hollywood as a godless, sybaritic group of pretentious artists engaged in the manufacture of questionable content dangerous to people of faith.

The 'Weinstein strategy' v. 'flyover' values

Hollywood has discovered a new and highly effective way for a high-profile player to become a household name around the world. This is significant because in Tinseltown building name recognition, being in the press, and having constant public visibility are key components of the game.

The success of faith-friendly media

The relationship between the "church" and the "media" has been a strange and storied one from the beginning -- going from patronage to protest and back again.

'In the room where it happens'

In the Broadway megahit "Hamilton," Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison meet together to decide on foundational policies that would still have major ramifications today... and all behind closed doors.

Behind the lines: The rise of Christians in Hollywood

When I first arrived in Hollywood after college in 1976, it was tough finding anyone who would admit to being a Christian. Christians were here, but they were hidden away and rarely heard. With few exceptions, the pattern was predictable: If they were concerned about their job, they kept quiet about their faith. If they were at the top of the industry, they felt a bit more free to express their convictions. But only those retired or near the end of their careers felt the confidence actually "to come out" as believers.

Not-so-strange bedfellows in media

The Lone Ranger would have been proud. Appearing out of nowhere but just in the nick of time 12 years ago, a modern-day crusader helped others breathe a sigh of relief. His assistance has since morphed into an important friendship, and a working relationship between conservative Christians and Orthodox Jews.