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Electrical lines will be used for broadband Internet access as IBM Corp. partners with a smaller firm to improve access for rural areas not served by cable or DSL. They plan to work with local electric cooperatives. (Getty Images)

Breaking up the public broadcaster monopoly

The notion of a profound “digital divide” between urban and rural areas in America is hardly new. The real issue is what America should do about it — and whether the government or private sector should take the lead.

Phishing Moscow Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Mueller in hot pursuit

Last Friday, a federal grand jury sitting in Washington, D.C., indicted 13 Russian nationals and three Russian corporations for conspiracy and for using false instruments and computer hacking so as to influence the American presidential election in 2016. The indictment alleges a vast, organized and professional effort, funded by tens of millions of dollars, whereby Russian spies passed themselves off as Americans on the internet, on the telephone and even in person here in the U.S. to sow discord about Hillary Clinton and thereby assist in the election of Donald Trump.

Russia's Puppet Candidate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The great strategic deception

The underlying theme promoted by the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee (DNC), supported by the mainstream media, that there was collusion between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin to ensure a Hillary Clinton defeat, never made any strategic sense.

President Barack Obama laughs with Vice President Joe Biden during a ceremony in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) ** FILE **

Tracking the real collusion: Obama knew foreign entities were interfering; he did nothing

There is a lot of noise lately, and less signal, about the now debunked “Trump colluded with Russia” narrative. After special counsel Robert Mueller indicted 13 Russians for trolling Americans during the 2016 election, Democrats and various malcontents are in a tizzy to move their narrative goalposts. “Well,” they insist, “Trump said the whole Russian thing was a hoax. Now it’s proven it wasn’t,” or some such nonsense.

Nervous in North Africa

Officials in Morocco are apprehensive. “Africa is approaching a dangerous moment,” one of the Kingdom’s most senior political figures told me recently in Rabat. His bleak assessment, which I heard in virtually every meeting during my recent visit to the country, stems from what are essentially two factors.

Ottoman Slap Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turkey’s violence-tinged foreign policy

Speaking recently about his military’s ongoing invasion of the Kurdish-ruled Afrin region in northern Syria, Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan taught much of the world a rather bizarre term.

Illustration on Poland's new Holocaust law by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Poland’s new Holocaust law is a mockery

The French philosopher Voltaire said, “History is nothing but a pack of tricks that we play upon the dead.” Poland’s new Holocaust law is yet another pack of tricks played upon the millions of murdered Jews in the Holocaust.

Illustration on Trump's Goldilocks economy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s Goldilocks economy

President Trump may have a bear market, but he has a Goldilocks economy. While it is too early to definitively know about the former, each passing day shows the latter growing more certain. His critics who are seizing on recent stock market volatility are missing the bigger picture of the economy underlying it.

Illustration on sexual misconduct and opera by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sexual harassment in opera

Opera has it all. Love. Murder. Rape. And most fascinating, in the case of Puccini’s “Tosca” a peek into the rapist’s thinking. In fact, he tells all. In church.

Vladimir Putin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Everybody’s playing the new game in town

- The Washington Times

Washington measures everything and everyone by politics, and dysfunction is the new game in town. Rant and rage has become the lingua franca of the nation’s capital. Taking the measure of Robert Mueller’s indictment of 13 Russian cybernauts for interfering on Vladimir Putin’s behalf in the 2016 presidential campaign is easy.

China's Jack Ma, Alibaba Group founder and executive chairman, speaks during a panel session during the 47th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum, WEF, in Davos, Switzerland, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017. (Laurent Gillieron/Keystone via AP) ** FILE **

Artificial intelligence can read! And now customer service reps must go

- The Washington Times

An economic boom just dropped on the world — and most, no doubt, aren’t even aware. What happened? China’s retail and technology conglomerate, Alibaba, developed an artificial intelligence model that beat the humans it competed against in a Stanford University reading and comprehension test. This is historic.

Related Articles

In this Dec. 4, 2017 photo, Southwest Minnesota hog producer Randy Spronk poses at his farm near Edgerton, Minn. Minnesota farmers like Spronk fear they could lose millions of dollars if the United States leaves the North American Free Trade Agreement.  (Mark Steil/Minnesota Public Radio via AP)

The trouble with tariffs

The stronger economy we're enjoying now is no accident. Lower taxes, more jobs and fewer regulations are creating a much-needed boost. So why do we still have one foot on the brake?

When a nation seals the fate of its enemies

Targeted assassination is a type of premeditated killing of those who pose an imminent threat. It is usually carried out by a covert intelligence or military unit often when the enemy's capture is made impossible by his protected presence in hostile territory.

New gun laws mean fewer rights

Before we pass any new gun laws there are a few questions to be answered. Which crimes have the already-passed gun laws stopped and which crimes will the new laws stop? What will we do differently to enforce these new laws?

Wrong amendment cited

The debate over gun control versus gun rights has been perverted beyond belief. This conflict has absolutely nothing to do with the Second Amendment to the Constitution. Anyone who knows anything about the history of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights knows that the Second Amendment was about citizens having the right to bear arms and confront an oppressive government, as the colonists did against the British.

Crumbling Infrastructure (Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times)

A tax proposal to nowhere

Repairing the nation's highways is a good idea. Paying for it with a uuuuuuuge increase in the federal gasoline tax is not a good idea. Donald Trump has had some good ideas over his first year in the White House, but socking it to motorists is not one of them.

Marylene Dinliana, 18, holds a sign that reads, "Stop Spilling Our Blood" during a protest against guns on the steps of the Broward County Federal courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018. Nikolas Cruz, a former student, shot and killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, earlier in the week. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Obnoxious, ignorant teens now demand curbs on guns

- The Washington Times

Teens across the nation, fed up with school shootings, are planning marches, media events and three-minute demonstrations at the White House in order to get across their messages of frustration with the Second Amendment and to demand lawmakers take immediate action. Now if only they weren't so dang entitled, snarky and obnoxious.

In this Jan. 14, 2017, photo, tax forms sit on a desk at the start of the tax season rush, inside the offices of tax preparation firm Infinite Tax Solutions, in Boulder, Colo. Filing taxes early could speed your return and protect your identity. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Taxing America out of its liberties

As you struggle to submit something to Uncle Sam that won't send federal agents to your door, guns blazing, it's worth pondering how immoral and unconstitutional the whole thing is.

Illustration on the aggressive strategic future of Syria by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The new 'great game' in Syria

In the second half of the 19th century, the British and Russian empires competed for domination of Central Asia in what history labels "The Great Game." A new "great game," with the entire Middle East at stake, is now being played out in Syria. The opponents are Russia and Iran on one side and the U.S. and Israel on the other. Both sides will try to use Arab states and Turkey as pawns.

Logical Progression of a Gun Ban Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More laws do not a moral people make

This past Valentine's Day, Nikolas Cruz entered a classroom in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and proceeded to murder 17 people and wound 15 others. Before any meaningful criminal investigation could even begin, our nation's cultural elites rushed to their respective podiums, finding fault and casting aspersions. Scoring political points is the name of the game. Removing personal rights embedded in our Constitution and replacing them with more laws and less freedom seems to be the only way they know to keep score.

Unrest in India Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

India's democracy and Modi's reforms

If there's one thing we've learned about Prime Minister Narendra Modi is that he's not afraid of using radical maneuvers to accomplish his economic agenda for India.

Chart to acccompany Moore article of Feb. 19, 2018.

Obama's real debt and deficit legacy

- The Washington Times

Congressional Republicans have been raked over the coals in the last two weeks for slamming through budget caps and inflating government spending and debt by another $300 billion. The criticisms are well deserved.

FBI Director Robert Mueller listens as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 13, 2013, as the House Judiciary Committee held an oversight hearing on the FBI. Mueller is nearing the end of his 12 years as head of the law enforcement agency that is conducting high-profile investigations of the Boston Marathon bombings, the attacks in Benghazi, Libya, and leaks of classified government information. The committee's chairman, Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., said when it comes to national security leaks, it's important to balance the need to protect secrecy with the need to let the news media do their job. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Mr. Mueller's indictments

Robert Mueller's indictments of 13 Russians for interfering in the 2016 presidential election is not the end of his investigation, nor was the announcement Friday an interim report on what he has found so far. President Trump's victory lap on Friday might prove to be premature, but nobody can rightly blame him for what sounds like the last laugh at accusations that he colluded with the Russians to defeat Hillary Clinton.

Bungling at the FBI

A policeman's lot is not a happy one, and these are miserable days for the FBI, stung by accusations that it bungled high-profile political investigations, and just when the legacy media was ready for an all-out assault on Donald Trump and guns for conducting the massacre of children in Florida the FBI is revealed to have ignored a tip that would likely have prevented unspeakable tragedy.

Why is 'waqf' not in discussion?

Kudos to Clifford D. May for identifying some of the issues preventing resolution of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict ("Why peace can't be processed now," Web, Feb. 13). He touches upon the biggest stumbling block: a rigid Islamic ideology, which receives little or no attention and should be part of the discussion.

A penetrating look at Putin's rule

Fellow writers take note: Your work is being monitored every day by a Russian agency that formerly was part of the Russian SVR foreign intelligence service, successor to the KGB of the old Soviet Union.