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Ottoman Slap Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turkey’s violence-tinged foreign policy

Speaking recently about his military’s ongoing invasion of the Kurdish-ruled Afrin region in northern Syria, Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan taught much of the world a rather bizarre term.

Illustration on Poland's new Holocaust law by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Poland’s new Holocaust law is a mockery

The French philosopher Voltaire said, “History is nothing but a pack of tricks that we play upon the dead.” Poland’s new Holocaust law is yet another pack of tricks played upon the millions of murdered Jews in the Holocaust.

Illustration on Trump's Goldilocks economy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s Goldilocks economy

President Trump may have a bear market, but he has a Goldilocks economy. While it is too early to definitively know about the former, each passing day shows the latter growing more certain. His critics who are seizing on recent stock market volatility are missing the bigger picture of the economy underlying it.

Illustration on sexual misconduct and opera by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sexual harassment in opera

Opera has it all. Love. Murder. Rape. And most fascinating, in the case of Puccini’s “Tosca” a peek into the rapist’s thinking. In fact, he tells all. In church.

Vladimir Putin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Everybody’s playing the new game in town

- The Washington Times

Washington measures everything and everyone by politics, and dysfunction is the new game in town. Rant and rage has become the lingua franca of the nation’s capital. Taking the measure of Robert Mueller’s indictment of 13 Russian cybernauts for interfering on Vladimir Putin’s behalf in the 2016 presidential campaign is easy.

China's Jack Ma, Alibaba Group founder and executive chairman, speaks during a panel session during the 47th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum, WEF, in Davos, Switzerland, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017. (Laurent Gillieron/Keystone via AP) ** FILE **

Artificial intelligence can read! And now customer service reps must go

- The Washington Times

An economic boom just dropped on the world — and most, no doubt, aren’t even aware. What happened? China’s retail and technology conglomerate, Alibaba, developed an artificial intelligence model that beat the humans it competed against in a Stanford University reading and comprehension test. This is historic.

Illustration on the need for clearer scrutiny and vetting for firearm purchases by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Confronting school shootings

In the emotional aftermath of every school shooting, experts criticize and offer solutions. “Arm teachers, more cops, fewer guns, psychiatric commitments and barbed wire perimeters.” We can also have lengthy discussions on the disintegration of the family, but any real change is generations away. So, what now?

Philadelphia Aliens Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the radical agenda meets immigration

Liberal Democrats don’t like the broad term illegal immigrants, so the joke goes, as they much prefer to think of them as undocumented future registered Democrats.

In this Dec. 4, 2017 photo, Southwest Minnesota hog producer Randy Spronk poses at his farm near Edgerton, Minn. Minnesota farmers like Spronk fear they could lose millions of dollars if the United States leaves the North American Free Trade Agreement.  (Mark Steil/Minnesota Public Radio via AP)

The trouble with tariffs

The stronger economy we’re enjoying now is no accident. Lower taxes, more jobs and fewer regulations are creating a much-needed boost. So why do we still have one foot on the brake?

Crumbling Infrastructure (Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times)

A tax proposal to nowhere

Repairing the nation’s highways is a good idea. Paying for it with a uuuuuuuge increase in the federal gasoline tax is not a good idea. Donald Trump has had some good ideas over his first year in the White House, but socking it to motorists is not one of them.

Illustration on the aggressive strategic future of Syria by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The new ‘great game’ in Syria

In the second half of the 19th century, the British and Russian empires competed for domination of Central Asia in what history labels “The Great Game.” A new “great game,” with the entire Middle East at stake, is now being played out in Syria. The opponents are Russia and Iran on one side and the U.S. and Israel on the other. Both sides will try to use Arab states and Turkey as pawns.

Logical Progression of a Gun Ban Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More laws do not a moral people make

This past Valentine’s Day, Nikolas Cruz entered a classroom in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and proceeded to murder 17 people and wound 15 others. Before any meaningful criminal investigation could even begin, our nation’s cultural elites rushed to their respective podiums, finding fault and casting aspersions. Scoring political points is the name of the game. Removing personal rights embedded in our Constitution and replacing them with more laws and less freedom seems to be the only way they know to keep score.

Related Articles

Why is 'waqf' not in discussion?

Kudos to Clifford D. May for identifying some of the issues preventing resolution of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict ("Why peace can't be processed now," Web, Feb. 13). He touches upon the biggest stumbling block: a rigid Islamic ideology, which receives little or no attention and should be part of the discussion.

A penetrating look at Putin's rule

Fellow writers take note: Your work is being monitored every day by a Russian agency that formerly was part of the Russian SVR foreign intelligence service, successor to the KGB of the old Soviet Union.

Shootings fault of amorality

Here in the North Woods we are saddened and distraught by the news of another tragic school shooting. We have listened to all the knee-jerk gun-control/confiscation rhetoric. But none of it answers the question of why these shootings are happening now.

Relatives mourn one of two Palestinian teenagers who were killed Saturday trying to infiltrate Israel, during his funeral in the Rafah refugee camp, southern Gaza Strip, Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018. The Israeli military said it struck 18 targets in Gaza early on Sunday, in response to an explosive device that wounded four Israeli soldiers, along the border with the territory. (AP Photo/ Khalil Hamra)

Gaza suspiciously flares up after Syrian attack on Israel

The shoot-down of an Israeli F-16 after an Iranian drone was flown into Israeli airspace last week was widely reported. However, what is even more interesting, but not widely reported or discussed, is the flare-up of violence from the Gaza Strip, where Israel fought a short conflict in 2014 against Hamas terror.

In this Sunday, April 12, 2009, file photo, the American flag waves in Rockville, Md. (AP Photo/J.  Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

Utah: U.S. flag shredded; ISIS flag raised

- The Washington Times

Somebody in Utah just ripped down an American flag flying at Hurricane High School, shredded it and tossed it into the streets, then raised what appeared to be a banner used by ISIS on the pole in its place. This is how the culture views our country? This is how society rates America?

In this Jan. 26, 2009, file photo, a customer looks at the menu at a McDonald's drive-thru in Williamsville, N.Y. (AP Photo/David Duprey, File)

Cancer findings a bit of a joke

- The Washington Times

A new study of 100,000-plus French adults has found that those who eat a lot of processed foods and drink a good deal of sugary drinks are more likely to develop a variety of cancers than those who, say, eat healthy food. What? You don't say.

Kim Yo-jong, sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, arrives at the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018. (Associated Press)

The snookered press at Pyeongchang

- The Washington Times

When Kim Jong-un dispatched his crack propaganda team to Pyeongchang (and not P.F. Chang, the Chinese restaurant chain, as reported by NBC News) to cover the Winter Olympics, he couldn't have imagined that the American media in town would have been so easy to con.

Illustration on history repeating itself in U.S. involvement in Afghanistan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How Afghanistan can take the road not taken in Vietnam

We haven't heard much about Afghanistan in the news lately. Occasionally, an American will be killed, or there will be a bombing, but the current U.S. strategy of the "Afghanization" seems to have produced a stalemate that is not necessarily a bad thing.

Illustration on Mongolia's desire to separate from China by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Divided, Mongolia cannot stand

A celebrity and business tycoon being elected president. A man whose campaign touted nationalism, with a slogan of putting the nation "first."

Patent Law Working Properly Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Patent reform and innovation

On February 5, the Senate confirmed Andre Iancu as director of the Patent and Trademark Office.

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with North Korean defectors where he talked with reporters about allowing the release of a secret memo on the FBI's role in the Russia inquiry, in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) ** FILE **

The perilous Trump budget

After promising voters in 2016 that he would balance the budget, President Trump has proposed a $4.4 trillion spending plan for fiscal year 2019 that is dangerously unbalanced.

South African President Jacob Zuma addresses the nation and press at the government's Union Buildings in Pretoria, South Africa, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. South Africa's President Jacob Zuma says he will resign 'with immediate effect' (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)

Ouster in South Africa

This week marked the 28th anniversary of the release of Nelson Mandela from prison. On Wednesday, one of Mr. Mandela's prison neighbors at Robben Island, Jacob Zuma, resigned as president of the country a year short of the term to which he was duly elected.