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Illustration on the growing threat of nuclear crisis with North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Discounting the North Korea threat countdown

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, speaking to the Reagan National Defense Forum on Dec. 2, offered up a doomsday prediction. When asked how close the United States and North Korea are to war, Mr. McMaster replied, “It’s increasing every day.” Sen. Jim Inhofe, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, seconded that statement in even more distressing language: “It is important for us here in the Senate to communicate to the American people the credible, grave, and immediate threat that we face . We don’t have the luxury of time.”

A detail of the baby Jesus is seen in a Nativity scene in the East Room during a media preview of the 2017 holiday decorations at the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Colleges push hard for Christ-free Christmases

- The Washington Times

College administrators around the country, it seems, are rushing to acquiesce to even the most minor of voices on campuses to make sure the “C” word — that’s “C” for Christmas, shhh! — doesn’t cause angst in some offended student’s ears. Basically, they’re driving hard to drive out the reason for the season, Jesus Christ.

Illustration on The Washington Post's treatment of Judge Roy Moore by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Molested by the media

You don’t have to be a fan of Alabama’s Republican senatorial nominee Roy Moore to see that the Furies in the media aren’t willing to cut him a break even when his most lethal accusers have been caught falsifying the record. The late Charles Manson seems to have gotten a more sympathetic press. For the past two months, the “Never Moore” media have tried to sink the judge by insisting his dating of teenage girls when he was in his 30s was scandalous on its face, even when they were of age, their mothers approved and the women themselves conceded he never engaged in sexual misconduct.

Illustration on Roy Moore's run for the Senate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Roy Moore and the politics of winning

It now looks as if Roy Moore, the Republican candidate for the Senate in Alabama, will win his race, despite the publicity about his alleged improper behavior with a 14-year-old girl 38 years ago, and maybe others young girls as well.

FILE - In this May 7, 2015, file photo, labor union members and supporters rally for better wages in New York. Nearly 2 million New York workers are unionized. New York's powerful labor unions are lining up against a constitutional convention, warning voters that opening up the state's main governing document could lead to the erosion of worker protections and rights such as collective bargaining. In November 2017, New Yorkers will be asked whether to hold a convention, where delegates would consider big changes to the constitution. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Reining in the worker center end run

Is it the beginning of the end for Big Labor’s henchmen? You’d be forgiven if you think I’m referring to the Hoffas. I’m actually talking about so-called worker centers, which have recently been the labor movement’s bludgeon — all while avoiding federal rules on union transparency and conduct.

Illustration on the risks of the Middle-East peace process by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good Luck, Jared Kushner

Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, and Jason Greenblatt, formerly one of the president’s real estate lawyers, are pursuing what the president calls the “ultimate deal,” a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. We should wish them luck because they’re going to need it.

Illustration on Trump's abiding political philosophy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Liberty, equity and fraternity

There’s a move to define Donald Trump as a populist, so as to link him to some of the nastier people in American politics, like Pitchfork Ben Tillman, Father Coughlin and David Duke.

Illustration on improvements to the GOP tax plan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Five ways to improve the tax bill

The Senate-passed tax bill is a policy triumph that will provide a shot of performance enhancing drugs into the veins of the economy. It’s not perfect, but the combined effect of cutting business tax rates, eliminating the state and local tax deduction, and repealing the ObamaCare individual mandate tax, means we are at the precipice of the biggest conservative policy victory since the Reagan years.

Stained Glass Badge Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The courage to judge

The Washington Surgi-Clinic in Washington, D.C. is now on record saying that, for a modest fee, it will perform a late-term abortion on a healthy, viable baby boy or girl.

With the deadline looming to pass a spending bill to fund the government by week's end, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., meets reporters following a closed-door strategy session, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Tougher challenges than cutting taxes

Passing tax reform in record time will prove a significant accomplishment, but it pales by comparison to the challenges Republicans must tackle next.

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Education Savings Accounts for Californians Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A golden opportunity for California students

Whether Congress enacts a federal elementary and secondary education savings account (ESA) program as part of its tax reform package is anybody's guess. Yet one thing's for certain: The states shouldn't wait for Congress to expand educational options — especially California.

Affordable Pharmaceuticals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making drugs more affordable with the Creates Act

The politicians who set out to fix America's health care system ended up making many things worse. This is no surprise. It's the Washington way. Costs are still rising, even for those of us who've reached the age where Medicare has stepped in and become our primary insurance.

Two people prepare to ride the world's longest urban zip line, with a speed of up to 80 kilometers per hour on a one kilometer run from 170 meter to ground level, in the Marina district of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

How the Dubai miracle was realized

The Great Recession of 2008-09 convinced me, like many other observers, that the city-state of Dubai's razzmatazz — Go skiing in the boiling heat! Gawk at the world's tallest building! — was but a desert mirage. I lambasted Dubai in a 2009 article for "hucksterism and fast talk," running a "trompe l'oeil economy," and suckering outsiders with Ponzi-scheme real estate deals. It appeared to be only a matter of time until the whole edifice collapsed.

Advertisement from the Archdiocese of Washington rejected by the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority.

Rejecting 'the perfect gift'

The rate at which Christmas is being leached of spiritual meaning and replaced with frenzied online shopping isn't increasing fast enough for some.

President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington. Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital despite intense Arab, Muslim and European opposition to a move that would upend decades of U.S. policy and risk potentially violent protests. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

This year, in Jerusalem

For once, Donald Trump's taste for all-capital letters makes the right point with blunt precision: "Jerusalem IS Israel's capital: I will move our embassy there AND make peace with the Palestinians." Making peace with people who don't want peace is always difficult, when it's not impossible, but the president promises to soldier on.

In this undated photo provided by General Motors Holden, cars are assembled on the production line in Adelaide, Australia.  The Australian auto manufacturing era ends after more than 90 years on Friday, Oct. 20, 2017 when General Motors Co.'s last Holden sedan rolls off the production line in the industrial city of Adelaide. The nation has already begun mourning the demise of a home-grown industry in an increasing crowded and changing global car market. (General Motors Holden via AP)

No requiem for the internal-combustion engine

Standing on principle is admirable, but sitting on a Plan B just in case is smart. Automakers are doing both to navigate the obstacles they face in building vehicles both powerful and clean. It's only wise strategy — the future of the fuel is fuzzy.

Court should rule for gay couple

If the Supreme Court were to rule in favor of the baker who refused to bake a cake for a gay couple's wedding, it would risk spurring copycat claims ("The Latest: Baker and gay couple at court for cake arguments," Web, Dec. 5). Public-accommodations laws require businesses not to discriminate on the basis of race, gender, religion and (in almost half the states, including Colorado) sexual orientation. The First Amendment rights regarding free speech and the exercise of religion, though fundamental to our constitutional republic, do not abrogate these laws, the baker's sincere religious faith notwithstanding.

Up gas tax to fund transit work

Late Illinois Republican congressman and 1980 National Unity Party presidential candidate John Anderson was ahead of his time. In 1980 he called for a gasoline tax up to 50 cents per gallon to pay for highway- and transit-infrastructure projects.

Out of this world, but not as fine as its predecessor

You can count on an Andy Weir novel to be out of this world. He took us to the Red Planet in his phenomenally successful, mind-blowing debut novel, "The Martian." Now, in his second one, "Artemis," he sends us to the moon.

Russia and U.S. shaking hands

Deplorables and Useful Idiots for Peace

According to the current political vocabulary the "deplorables" are people who are rooting for Trump, while the "useful idiots" are those who believe that for the United States it is much better to have Russia as a friend rather than a foe.

Shutdown Schumer T-shirt Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Snookering the dealmaker

- The Washington Times

The coming government shutdown that at least some congressional leaders are working hard to avoid was predicted by many when President Trump sidestepped congressional Republicans to cut a deal with Democratic leaders last fall. The deal was celebrated in the media and elated a president desperate for good press, but left Republicans worrying about what the White House gave up for a few headlines.

Illustration on the troubles started by Hillary Clinton's claims of Russian interference by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Russia's influence spreads

Last week we discovered that former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn lied to the FBI about the import of what he told them regarding his contacts with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. Yet Mr. Flynn once served as director of the Defense Intelligence Agency during the presidency of Barack Obama. Why would he lie to the FBI about what passed between him and Mr. Kislyak? Had he forgotten that, for a certitude, the conversation of a Russian ambassador was being recorded secretly by American intelligence agencies? Moreover, when he was being interviewed by the FBI, why did he not bring with him a lawyer? When I was being interviewed by the FBI about my perfidious Arkansas Project, I most certainly brought a lawyer with me, and it helped that my lawyer looked like he once worked for Don Corleone. Thinking back on it, I should have brought two lawyers.

Removing Obama Net Neutrality Regulations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Restoring a light touch to Internet regulations

Over the last two weeks, there has been a vigorous debate about internet regulation. Under the plan I recently proposed, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) would restore internet freedom by rolling back heavy-handed government regulations imposed during the Obama administration. Some have tried to whip Americans into a frenzy by making outlandish claims. Feeding the hysteria are silly accusations that the plan will "end the internet as we know it" or threaten American democracy itself.

Illustration on the danger of an EMP attack by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Death by stupidity?

America's epitaph may be: "Died of stupidity."

Illustration on Democrat objections to a tax cut by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A tax cut America can afford

Republican congressional leaders appear likely to pass tax reforms and cuts that the country needs and can afford — but whose benefits Democrats can hardly bear to face.

The Crony Castes of India Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When greed meets globalization

America's latest Clinton scandal — the 2010 sale of U.S. uranium to a Russian-controlled mining company, which allegedly benefited the Clinton Foundation to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars — has reminded me of the old proverb that says the love of money is the root of all kinds of evil.