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In this Dec. 15, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State and presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to the GirlsBuildLA Leadership Summit in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

A bitter Hillary Clinton strikes again

Hillary Clinton has not had a good week. In the aftermath of her trip to India and awful comments about Americans and women in particular, most of her allies and Democrats in general were explicit that it was time for her to leave the political arena. The shorter message from Democrats to Mrs. Clinton was “shut up and go away.”

Illustration on the upcoming meeting between President Trump and Kim Jong-un by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A just resolution of the North Korean conflict

President Donald Trump’s bold decision to accept the invitation of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un for a meeting was unprecedented. Although this will be the first meeting of a sitting president with a North Korean leader, it follows a series of temporary successes the U.S. has had with North Korea during the past 25 years.

Then-President Barack Obama on stage during a panel discussion as part of the White House Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) in the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) ** FILE **

Privacy pitfalls of AI-driven health care hard to ignore

- The Washington Times

Artificial intelligence may provide a world of convenience when it comes to suggesting which purchases an Amazon user might want to next make, or what song titles a Pandora listener might also enjoy clicking. But when it comes to AI in the health field, America should tread carefully. The pitfalls, particularly in the area of personal privacies, could very well outweigh the benefits.

Illustration on the positive consequences of mergers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why mergers make sense

Donald Trump is producing the kind of shoot-the-moon economic recovery that we last saw under Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. He’s copied a lot of the Reagan playbook: Deregulate, cut taxes, promote American energy. He should also think about adopting another Reaganite initiative: Let American companies, grow, merge, restructure and become more profitable so they can compete on the global stage.

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Trump to Mohammed bin Salman: Focus on Iran

When Donald Trump meets with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the de facto ruler of Saudi Arabia, the president should have three clear and forceful messages for his reform-oriented guest: Focus your undivided attention to adopting a soft power approach to the Iranian regime, end the war in Yemen and lift your blockade of American ally Qatar.

Illustration on school choice fro military families by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Saluting school choice for military families

Americans who join the military know they’ll be making sacrifices. They put their lives on the line, obviously, but beyond that, they know they’ll have no say in where they live. Indeed, frequent moves are often part of the package.

A Muslim man wears a headband showing the Islamic State group's symbol. A lax legislative approach in some European countries makes it hard to prosecute returning militants. (Associated Press/File)

When ISIS fighters return home

What should not be an option is to treat returning terrorists with ever-greater levels of tolerance. Yet that is the option a number of Europeans advocate.

Illustration on Syrian strategic choices by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A mission quandary in Syria

Almost two weeks ago, after yet another incident of a chlorine gas attack by Syria’s Assad regime, Defense Secretary James Mattis warned both Syria and its Russian ally that using gas weapons against civilians or on the battlefield was very unwise. Last week, U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley was more blunt, warning that America is “prepared to act if we must” to stop indiscriminate bombings of civilians by the Assad regime.

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These weapons not 'assault rifles'

I expect better of The Washington Times than to blindly repeat the liberal myth that stores are selling "assault weapons" ("Outdoors stores quietly continue to sell assault weapons," Web, March 13). Military select-fire assault weapons such as the M16, and M4 are by definition capable of firing "fully automatic" (i.e., emptying the entire clip with one press of the trigger). Virtually no gun stores sell these; the few "Class III" dealers who are allowed to do so require a special federal license and a personal recommendation from the local chief of police.

President Donald Trump reviews border wall prototypes, Tuesday, March 13, 2018, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Something there is that likes a wall

"What you have to understand about Donald Trump, a perceptive observer of the American scene once told a visitor from abroad, "is that the press here takes him literally, but not seriously, and his millions of supporters take him seriously, but not literally."

Roger Federer, of Switzerland, left, smiles as he and partner Bill Gates play in an exhibition tennis match against Jack Sock and Savannah Guthrie in San Jose, Calif., Monday, March 5, 2018. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu) ** FILE **

Bill Gates: 'I don't agree with the America first rhetoric'

- The Washington Times

Bill Gates, whose private fortune was planted and sown in the garden called Capitalism -- the particular brand of America's economy, dontcha know -- just came out swinging about President Donald Trump's "America first" mantra. The billionaire, it appears, doesn't agree. He thinks Trump's signature mantra unfairly cuts into foreign aid budgets and that the way to greatness is paved with more and larger taxpayer handouts.

This photo provided by the Irving Police Department shows the homemade clock that Ahmed Mohamed brought to school,  Wednesday, Sept.16, 2015, in Irving. Police detained the 14-year-old Muslim boy after a teacher at MacArthur High School decided that the homemade clock he brought to class looked like a bomb, according to school and police officials. The family of Ahmed Mohamed said the boy was suspended for three days from the school in the Dallas suburb. (Irving Police via AP) ** FILE **

Clock Boy shut down again, hopefully for good

- The Washington Times

Ahmed Mohamed, better known as "Clock Boy" -- better known as the tool by which Barack Obama was able to advance his narrative of an anti-Muslim America -- just lost yet another of his family's court cases. And for the love of God, please let this be the last.

President Donald Trump meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Oval Office of the White House, Monday, March 5, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) ** FILE **

America's love affair with Israel grows under Trump

- The Washington Times

The left likes to try to sell the line that the Palestinian Authority loves the Israelis, welcomes peace and wants nothing more than a harmonious agreement that allows both peoples to live side-by-side, in perpetual prosperity -- oh yes, and that President Donald Trump's announced move of the U.S. Embassy to Israel from Tel Avid to Jerusalem kills that plan. But apparently, the line isn't selling.

How Hillary Clinton still misses the point

Woe are the Democrats. For generations now, they've been telling the American people that only they, and their cohort of liberals and leftists, understand and truly value women. Because of their special understanding of women, only they can be trusted to do what's right politically for them, they tell us. Then came Hillary Clinton pulling the curtain back on that dangerously false narrative.

Climate Change Rations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Apocalypse now?

Since the beginning of recorded history there have been end-of-the-world predictions. In recent years we have had radio preachers, politicians and scientists declare with certainty that the world would soon end, either because of our decadent lifestyle, or because of "global warming," now known as "climate change."

Illustration on the abuse of truth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Twitter, truthiness and titillation

When talking politics, online or in person, you don't often hear anything about the "magnificent middle." You'll hear epithets like the "dirtbag left" or the wicked "alt-right," and all of the ugly free associations to commies and fascists, loonies and wackos. Moderation is mush, evenhandedness is stupid, considering two sides of an issue is so 20th century (or maybe 19th). Only one side could possibly be right.

Illustration on Trump, Stormy Daniels and freedom of speech by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

President Trump and freedom of speech

When James Madison drafted the First Amendment — "Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech" -- he made sure to use the article "the" in front of the word "freedom." What seemed normal to him and superfluous to moderns was actually a profound signal that has resonated for 227 years. The signal was that because the freedom of speech existed before the government that was formed to protect it came into existence, it does not have its origins in government.

Broward County Schools' Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The slow learners of Broward County

Broward County, Florida, is a nice progressive place with a Democratic School Board and a Democratic sheriff. The county was living the South Florida dream until Valentine's Day, when a homicidal maniac broke into one of its high schools and slaughtered 17 of its students and faculty, one of whom was an unarmed security guard and assistant football coach.

A welder fabricates a steel structure at an iron works facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Monday, March 5, 2018. United States President Donald Trump has lobbed a grenade of uncertainty onto the NAFTA negotiating table, suggesting that tariffs on Canadian and Mexican steel are now dependent on whether the countries agree to a new trade pact. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP)

U.S. trade relations

President Trump made his mark as a businessman prior to occupying the Oval Office and he often gives his sales pitch for America: The country is once again open for business.

Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Buying the Brooklyn Bridge from North Korea

President Trump is poorly served by State Department and national security advisers who recommend meeting dictator Kim Jong-un to discuss North Korea's denuclearization.

Medical Supply Shortage Effect Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When shortages strike medical supplies

As national health care costs skyrocket, the shortage of some basic medical supplies and drugs is limiting patients' access to care and threatening lives.

Larry Kudlow (Gage Skidmore via Wikimedia Commons) **FILE**

A good choice for the economy

President Trump asked a conservative gathering the other day whether, "after my first year in office, can anyone doubt that I am a conservative?" It was a plaintive cry from a wounded ego (if not a wounded heart).

Republican Rick Saccone thanks supporters at the party watching the returns for a special election being held for the Pennsylvania 18th Congressional District vacated by Republican Tim Murphy, Tuesday, March 13, 2018, in McKeesport, Pa. A razor's edge separated Democrat Conor Lamb and Saccone Tuesday night in their closely watched special election in Pennsylvania, where a surprisingly strong bid by first-time candidate Lamb was testing Donald Trump's sway in a GOP stronghold.  (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Surprise in Pennsylvania

The Democrats have proved twice that they can win congressional seats with a Republican playbook. The Grand Old Party campaigned for years with the mantra, "vote Republican, we're not as bad as you think." The plea often failed. Republicans just didn't know how bad a lot of voters thought they were.

Learn from Tillerson firing

Unfortunately the final statement of Rex Tillerson as secretary of state was an ill-concealed attack on President Donald Trump and his policies ("Tillerson urges State Department officials to forge ahead with 'integrity,'" Web, March 13). This was a case of two strong-minded men who had major differences in foreign policy, with both having little experience in the area. Mr. Tillerson's short stay brings to mind a variation on a familiar statement: Appoint in haste and fire at will.

The allure and alarm of Scandi noir

"The Sandman" is packed with isolated prisoners -- though they are not usually in a prison. One woman is buried alive for years in a coffin fitted with an airpipe so she can breathe. Others are stuffed in plastic barrels, also with airpipes that make their captivity a long-term affair. Two half-starved children are locked in an air raid shelter that's so dark they can see nothing.