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When illegals use pilfered Social Security numbers

Last week, a House Ways and Means subcommittee heard testimony from the Social Security Administration acting commissioner about the widespread and ongoing theft of Social Security numbers (SSNs)from the American public. Despite its pervasiveness, the illegal alien side of the problem is rarely raised by the media or in Congress. Illegal immigration in general wasn’t mentioned at all during the May 17 hearing. And when the media does cover it, it’s commonly used as a rallying cry to support mass amnesty — the claim being that “illegal aliens pay into the system” and, therefore, “are as American as you and me.”

Illustration on the effects of recent tax cuts by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why liberals hate the Trump tax cut

Despite liberal hysterics, Republicans’ recent tax cut raised top earners’ share of America’s tax burden. This seemingly “squared circle” is simply due to a fact true before the legislation and even truer after: Middle- and upper-income earners shoulder the overwhelming tax load. Equally obvious: Even so large a share is not enough for an insatiable left.

Illustration on Russia's history of state breaking by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s love affair with state-breaking

In Russia’s long-term war against the West that includes the infiltration of domestic political systems, blackmail and the indirect influence of elected officials through “ethnic political organizations,” one of its most prized and enduring tactics is its exploitation of ethnoreligious rivalries and fissures within the states along its borders.

This is a sign in a Starbucks located in downtown Pittsburgh on Saturday, March 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Fighting bias with business

Last month’s arrest of two black men at a Philadelphia Starbucks has amplified accusations of a double standard in American society. Along with a financial settlement with the men, Starbucks responded by promising to close its stores for part of May 29 in order to conduct racial-bias training for store employees.

Freedom from Big Government Energy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Shining a light on Big Power’s monopoly

You might have missed it amid the never-ending drama in Washington, D.C., but a war over energy production and rates rages in America’s heartland.

Illustration on USDA destruction of research kittens by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ending taxpayer-funded kitty cruelty

I am a cat person. Nothing against dogs or dog people. I like dogs, too. Growing up, my family always had both. But no one falls equally into both categories; everyone has a preference.

Satchel Paige. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Mr. Mueller’s fishing pole needs a rest

- The Washington Times

Satchel Paige, the legendary master of the sinking curve ball and famous doctor of philosophy, had a few wise words that Robert Mueller could use just now: “Don’t look back, something might be gaining on you.”

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Protecting the Power Grid Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A secure energy grid starts with copper

It's not hard to imagine the role that energy plays in our daily lives — in fact it becomes immediately apparent when we experience even a brief power outage in our home or workplace. Quite simply, it stops us in our tracks.

In this May 21, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, right, holds a bilateral meeting with Qatar's Emir Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al-Thani, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Trump sided with Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries Tuesday in a deepening diplomatic crisis with Qatar, appearing to endorse the accusation that the oil-rich Persian Gulf nation is funding terrorist groups. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Peace in the Middle East

Donald Trump isn't the first man to point out that life in the Middle East is built largely on a mirage of fantasy and resentment. But he is the first man in a long time to do something about it. Moving the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem is simply a long-overdue recognition of the reality that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel, and the Jews aren't going anywhere.

Trump's federal disclosure

"Trump met federal disclosure requirement by reimbursing Cohen for Stormy Daniels payment: Government" (Web, May 16) is generally factual. However, the piece implies that controversy remains about whether the disclosure under the 1978 Ethics In Government Act was timely.

Who wants that award, anyway?

Your 17 May editorial, "A bad week for Democrats," says President Trump is not likely to win the Nobel Peace Prize. That's a no-brainer, because he's even less likely to accept it. He wouldn't want his name sullied by association with the likes of Barack Obama, Jimmy Carter and Yasser Arafat. Knowing this, the Nobel Committee wouldn't embarrass themselves by doing the right thing.

Finding better angels, and becoming better

The United States has a problem. We have devolved into a mostly anti-intellectual country, instead now run by showmen and politicians and talking heads and hucksters who would rather look and talk of themselves on TV or Facebook or look into a camera than talk of freedom, liberty, wisdom, philosophy. Where the great minds went, we don't know.

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with law enforcement officials on the MS-13 street gang and border security, in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump doubles down on MS-13 as 'animals'

- The Washington Times

So President Donald Trump referred to MS-13 murderous gang members as "animals" -- and the left went nuts. Trump, to his great credit, laughed off the criticism and doubled down on his original comments.

A protester carries a sign down the street near a Planned Parenthood health center in the Van Nuys section of Los Angeles on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017. Several dozen protesters gathered in California's San Fernando Valley demanding the organization be stripped of its federal funding.  (AP Photo/Richard Vogel) ** FILE **

Trump's about to make pro-life camp very happy

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has a new proposal, and it's one that's going to make his Christian and evangelical base quite happy. He's set his sights on reeling in Planned Parenthood and abortion -- another campaign promise coming true.

Illustration on voicing the interests of American aviation workers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A voice for the American worker

Presidents are judged by how they stand up for the American people. Whether it is protecting U.S. jobs or safeguarding our industries and our jobs from foreign trade cheating, we expect our presidents to act in the best interests of Americans.

James Comey. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The collusion of lawyers is finally collapsing

- The Washington Times

Colluding, like canoodling, is all the rage. Robert Mueller, like a dog chasing his tail, has been trying for more than a year to find evidence that President Trump colluded with Vladimir Putin and the Russians to cook the 2016 election, which fate, providence, fortune and destiny decreed properly belonged to Hillary Clinton.

Illustration on obstacles to the Trump/Kim summit by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Trump-Kim summit meets a hurdle

The prospects of denuclearization talks between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un began to fade this week.

Illustration on fighting extremism in Algeria by Linas Garsys/The WAshington Times

Ending extremism with a just solution

When Abdelaziz Bouteflika was elected president of Algeria in 1999, it was at the height of a heinous civil war that carried the very seeds of division and radicalism that plague the whole of the Middle East/North Africa region today.

Bad Trade Deals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump's foreign policy is sound, but the economy gets shorted

President Trump recognizes U.S. foreign policy has for too long sacrificed economic interests and the livelihoods of ordinary working Americans for other important goals — spreading democracy, human rights and alliance building. And we are not getting our money's worth — our allies expect Americans to bear disproportionate shares of the costs and risks to military personnel of dealing with maelstroms created by Russia, terrorists in the Middle East, China in the Pacific and the like.

In this May 9, 2018, file photo, CIA nominee Gina Haspel testifies during a confirmation hearing of the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

Gina Haspel confirmed

In the end, the resistance didn't work. Despite much hemming and hawing, the nomination of Gina Haspel to be the director of the Central Intelligence Agency passed the Senate this week. The vote was 54 to 45, with six Democrats supporting her. Two of those Democrats are members of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Mark Warner of Virginia and Joe Manchin of West Virginia. Their support sealed the success of the nomination earlier in the week.

U.S. losing people, jobs, revenue

It is expected that a U.S. president address the major concerns of citizens during his term in office. In 2016 more than 64,000 Americans died from drug overdoses, including from illicit and prescription opioids. About 17,000 deaths, including more than 15,000 from heroin, were from all illicit drugs. More than 99 percent of illegal drugs are shipped from Mexico.

Virtuoso exercises in period forms

In the early days of World War II, a group of mostly gay Oxford students spot an entrancing young man exercising in a room opposite. With "that glorious head, like a Roman gladiator those powerful shoulders the blue veins standing in the upper arms" he is seriously attractive.

Abbas still full of lies

Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas' so-called apology for his recent anti-Semitic speech was really no apology at all ("Palestinian president apologizes over anti-Semitic remarks," Web, May 4). In his speech, Mr. Abbas blamed Jews for bringing the Holocaust on themselves with their "social behavior," and denied the Jewish people's ancestral presence in what is today Israel. After being widely rebuked, he said he apologized "if people were offended" (yes, he actually said "if"). What he pointedly did not do was acknowledge that his statements were false.