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Electrical lines will be used for broadband Internet access as IBM Corp. partners with a smaller firm to improve access for rural areas not served by cable or DSL. They plan to work with local electric cooperatives. (Getty Images)

Breaking up the public broadcaster monopoly

The notion of a profound “digital divide” between urban and rural areas in America is hardly new. The real issue is what America should do about it — and whether the government or private sector should take the lead.

Phishing Moscow Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Mueller in hot pursuit

Last Friday, a federal grand jury sitting in Washington, D.C., indicted 13 Russian nationals and three Russian corporations for conspiracy and for using false instruments and computer hacking so as to influence the American presidential election in 2016. The indictment alleges a vast, organized and professional effort, funded by tens of millions of dollars, whereby Russian spies passed themselves off as Americans on the internet, on the telephone and even in person here in the U.S. to sow discord about Hillary Clinton and thereby assist in the election of Donald Trump.

Russia's Puppet Candidate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The great strategic deception

The underlying theme promoted by the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee (DNC), supported by the mainstream media, that there was collusion between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin to ensure a Hillary Clinton defeat, never made any strategic sense.

President Barack Obama laughs with Vice President Joe Biden during a ceremony in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) ** FILE **

Tracking the real collusion: Obama knew foreign entities were interfering; he did nothing

There is a lot of noise lately, and less signal, about the now debunked “Trump colluded with Russia” narrative. After special counsel Robert Mueller indicted 13 Russians for trolling Americans during the 2016 election, Democrats and various malcontents are in a tizzy to move their narrative goalposts. “Well,” they insist, “Trump said the whole Russian thing was a hoax. Now it’s proven it wasn’t,” or some such nonsense.

Nervous in North Africa

Officials in Morocco are apprehensive. “Africa is approaching a dangerous moment,” one of the Kingdom’s most senior political figures told me recently in Rabat. His bleak assessment, which I heard in virtually every meeting during my recent visit to the country, stems from what are essentially two factors.

Ottoman Slap Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turkey’s violence-tinged foreign policy

Speaking recently about his military’s ongoing invasion of the Kurdish-ruled Afrin region in northern Syria, Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan taught much of the world a rather bizarre term.

Illustration on Poland's new Holocaust law by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Poland’s new Holocaust law is a mockery

The French philosopher Voltaire said, “History is nothing but a pack of tricks that we play upon the dead.” Poland’s new Holocaust law is yet another pack of tricks played upon the millions of murdered Jews in the Holocaust.

Illustration on Trump's Goldilocks economy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s Goldilocks economy

President Trump may have a bear market, but he has a Goldilocks economy. While it is too early to definitively know about the former, each passing day shows the latter growing more certain. His critics who are seizing on recent stock market volatility are missing the bigger picture of the economy underlying it.

Illustration on sexual misconduct and opera by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sexual harassment in opera

Opera has it all. Love. Murder. Rape. And most fascinating, in the case of Puccini’s “Tosca” a peek into the rapist’s thinking. In fact, he tells all. In church.

Vladimir Putin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Everybody’s playing the new game in town

- The Washington Times

Washington measures everything and everyone by politics, and dysfunction is the new game in town. Rant and rage has become the lingua franca of the nation’s capital. Taking the measure of Robert Mueller’s indictment of 13 Russian cybernauts for interfering on Vladimir Putin’s behalf in the 2016 presidential campaign is easy.

Related Articles

FBI Director Robert Mueller listens as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 13, 2013, as the House Judiciary Committee held an oversight hearing on the FBI. Mueller is nearing the end of his 12 years as head of the law enforcement agency that is conducting high-profile investigations of the Boston Marathon bombings, the attacks in Benghazi, Libya, and leaks of classified government information. The committee's chairman, Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., said when it comes to national security leaks, it's important to balance the need to protect secrecy with the need to let the news media do their job. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Mr. Mueller's indictments

Robert Mueller's indictments of 13 Russians for interfering in the 2016 presidential election is not the end of his investigation, nor was the announcement Friday an interim report on what he has found so far. President Trump's victory lap on Friday might prove to be premature, but nobody can rightly blame him for what sounds like the last laugh at accusations that he colluded with the Russians to defeat Hillary Clinton.

Bungling at the FBI

A policeman's lot is not a happy one, and these are miserable days for the FBI, stung by accusations that it bungled high-profile political investigations, and just when the legacy media was ready for an all-out assault on Donald Trump and guns for conducting the massacre of children in Florida the FBI is revealed to have ignored a tip that would likely have prevented unspeakable tragedy.

Why is 'waqf' not in discussion?

Kudos to Clifford D. May for identifying some of the issues preventing resolution of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict ("Why peace can't be processed now," Web, Feb. 13). He touches upon the biggest stumbling block: a rigid Islamic ideology, which receives little or no attention and should be part of the discussion.

A penetrating look at Putin's rule

Fellow writers take note: Your work is being monitored every day by a Russian agency that formerly was part of the Russian SVR foreign intelligence service, successor to the KGB of the old Soviet Union.

Shootings fault of amorality

Here in the North Woods we are saddened and distraught by the news of another tragic school shooting. We have listened to all the knee-jerk gun-control/confiscation rhetoric. But none of it answers the question of why these shootings are happening now.

Relatives mourn one of two Palestinian teenagers who were killed Saturday trying to infiltrate Israel, during his funeral in the Rafah refugee camp, southern Gaza Strip, Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018. The Israeli military said it struck 18 targets in Gaza early on Sunday, in response to an explosive device that wounded four Israeli soldiers, along the border with the territory. (AP Photo/ Khalil Hamra)

Gaza suspiciously flares up after Syrian attack on Israel

The shoot-down of an Israeli F-16 after an Iranian drone was flown into Israeli airspace last week was widely reported. However, what is even more interesting, but not widely reported or discussed, is the flare-up of violence from the Gaza Strip, where Israel fought a short conflict in 2014 against Hamas terror.

In this Sunday, April 12, 2009, file photo, the American flag waves in Rockville, Md. (AP Photo/J.  Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

Utah: U.S. flag shredded; ISIS flag raised

- The Washington Times

Somebody in Utah just ripped down an American flag flying at Hurricane High School, shredded it and tossed it into the streets, then raised what appeared to be a banner used by ISIS on the pole in its place. This is how the culture views our country? This is how society rates America?

In this Jan. 26, 2009, file photo, a customer looks at the menu at a McDonald's drive-thru in Williamsville, N.Y. (AP Photo/David Duprey, File)

Cancer findings a bit of a joke

- The Washington Times

A new study of 100,000-plus French adults has found that those who eat a lot of processed foods and drink a good deal of sugary drinks are more likely to develop a variety of cancers than those who, say, eat healthy food. What? You don't say.

Kim Yo-jong, sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, arrives at the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018. (Associated Press)

The snookered press at Pyeongchang

- The Washington Times

When Kim Jong-un dispatched his crack propaganda team to Pyeongchang (and not P.F. Chang, the Chinese restaurant chain, as reported by NBC News) to cover the Winter Olympics, he couldn't have imagined that the American media in town would have been so easy to con.

Illustration on history repeating itself in U.S. involvement in Afghanistan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How Afghanistan can take the road not taken in Vietnam

We haven't heard much about Afghanistan in the news lately. Occasionally, an American will be killed, or there will be a bombing, but the current U.S. strategy of the "Afghanization" seems to have produced a stalemate that is not necessarily a bad thing.

Illustration on Mongolia's desire to separate from China by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Divided, Mongolia cannot stand

A celebrity and business tycoon being elected president. A man whose campaign touted nationalism, with a slogan of putting the nation "first."

Patent Law Working Properly Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Patent reform and innovation

On February 5, the Senate confirmed Andre Iancu as director of the Patent and Trademark Office.

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with North Korean defectors where he talked with reporters about allowing the release of a secret memo on the FBI's role in the Russia inquiry, in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) ** FILE **

The perilous Trump budget

After promising voters in 2016 that he would balance the budget, President Trump has proposed a $4.4 trillion spending plan for fiscal year 2019 that is dangerously unbalanced.

South African President Jacob Zuma addresses the nation and press at the government's Union Buildings in Pretoria, South Africa, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. South Africa's President Jacob Zuma says he will resign 'with immediate effect' (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)

Ouster in South Africa

This week marked the 28th anniversary of the release of Nelson Mandela from prison. On Wednesday, one of Mr. Mandela's prison neighbors at Robben Island, Jacob Zuma, resigned as president of the country a year short of the term to which he was duly elected.