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Illustration on high tech's deleterious effects on commerce by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Big Tech chameleon

Twenty years ago, no one had heard of either Facebook or Google, neither of which existed yet. For that matter, no one knew much about social media or search engines in general.

Taxpayer Money Lost in  Space Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The hidden fees of SpaceX

No one likes hidden fees. From unauthorized phone charges to home closing costs and prepaid card levies, they take a toll on low and middle-income Americans. To mitigate consumer outrage, members of Congress often demagogue unknown expenditures like ATM and airline baggage fees in committee hearings; costs which usually do not amount to more than a few dollars.

Uncle Sam Watching You Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The undoing of limited government

Late last week, Rep. Devin Nunes, California Republican, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, repeated his public observations that members of the intelligence community — particularly the CIA, the NSA and the intelligence division of the FBI — are not trustworthy with the nation’s intelligence secrets. Because he has a security clearance at the “top secret” level and knows how others who have access to secrets have used and abused them, his allegations are extraordinary.

Illustration on China's dam building frenzy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China’s dam frenzy

China’s hyperactive dam building is a reminder that, while international attention remains on its recidivist activities in the South China Sea’s disputed waters, it is also focusing quietly on other waters — of rivers that originate in Chinese-controlled territory like Tibet and flow to other countries. No country in history has built more dams than China. In fact, China today boasts more dams than the rest of the world combined.

Illustration on lowering veterans' suicide rates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lowering the suicide rates of those who serve

President Donald Trump last week signed an executive order which seeks to lower suicides rates among our nation’s veterans. The order, which would take effect in March, expands mental health services for transitioning veterans upon their return home to civilian life. Mr. Trump hailed the order as a “historic step to make sure that our incredible veterans are taken care of in a proper manner.”

FISA: A Rubber Stamp to Break the Law Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Institutionalizing Watergate

The “third rate burglary” of the Democratic National Committee’s offices at the Watergate hotel in 1972 was meant to spy on the Democratic presidential campaign. Now we’re beginning to understand how a Democratic administration pried into the 2016 Republican Campaign with the assistance of the CIA, the FBI, and the Department of Justice. The Democratic Party’s media wing tries to cover the spying and pretends that it uncovered dirt.

A supporter of President Donald Trump challenges police officers and a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program during a rally outside the office of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

Nightmare for Dreamers

DACA, “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals,” is an Obama pen-and-phone program, not one created by legislation. It was simply a policy announced by President Obama on June 15, 2013. The date was chosen because it was the 30th anniversary of Plyler v. Doe, a Supreme Court decision that barred public schools from charging illegal immigrant children tuition.

A pair of postal workers shovel the lot at the Plainville, Mass., Post Office Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018. The post office was open for business as usual.  (Mark Stockwell/The Sun Chronicle via AP)

Another view of the U.S. Postal Service

Along with political coverage and analysis generally regarded as top-flight, The Washington Times apparently also possesses a good sense of humor.

Sen. Charles E. Schumer. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Democrats decree death in the swamp for the Dreamers

- The Washington Times

Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi and their Democratic followers laid a careful trap for their Republican tormentors, and then fell in it. The Republican leadership can keep them from climbing out if they’re smart and show a little courage.

In this Jan. 10, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump listens during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Fearful Dems preemptively strike State of Union

- The Washington Times

Democrats must be shaking in their Birkenstocks. How else to explain their many, many and many more preemptive strikes at President Donald Trump’s State of the Union speech — a speech that doesn’t even take place until Jan. 30?

Illustration on an alliance between Irael and Saudi Arabia by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A secret Middle East alliance

A Swiss newspaper, Basler Zeitung, reported recently that a secret alliance between Israel and Saudi Arabia aimed at restraining Iran’s imperial desire for a land mass between Tehran and the Mediterranean was moving into a new phase. While there aren’t formal diplomatic ties between the two countries, military cooperation does exist. In fact, the Saudi government sent a military delegation to Jerusalem several months ago to discuss Iran’s role as a destabilizing force in the region.

Related Articles

TV doesn't qualify Oprah for president

In discussing voter psychology, author Aldous Huxley said in a 1958 interview, "A democracy depends on the individual voter making an intelligent and rational choice for what he regards as his enlightened self-interest " Conversely, according to Huxley, TV and radio advertising experts "try to bypass the rational side and appeal directly to these unconscious forces below the surfaces, so that you are, in a way, making nonsense of the whole democratic procedure, which is based on conscious choice on rational ground."

Climate scientists blowing hot air

Why do we keep listening to so-called "experts" who continue to change their story on climate change? As an engineer, I have found that if a set of data does not create to the results we observe, then there is a problem with the method of evaluation. The climate scientists have many years of data that they have used to predict climate-change results that have not been anywhere close to what has actually occurred.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks at a plaque dedication ceremony at the Central Park police precinct in New York, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Greasy business in the Big Apple

You might have thought that Michael Bloomberg, with his mercifully futile crusades to protect everyone from their guns and their Big Gulps, would have set a record for grandstanding by a New York City mayor that would stand through the ages. Bill de Blasio, his hulking successor, is giving the diminutive Mr. Bloomberg a real run for his money, or, actually, your money. The Bloomberg grandstand was pushed into the shade.

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump sits with Attorney General Jeff Sessions during the FBI National Academy graduation ceremony in Quantico, Va. Late last year, lawyers for Trump expressed optimism that special counsel Robert Mueller was nearing the end of his probe of Russias interference in the 2016 election. But if there was hope in the White House that Trump might be moving past an investigation that has dogged his presidency from the start, 2018 is beginning without signs of abatement.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump in the outhouse

The civil society seems to be in better hands than anyone imagined. Unfortunately, the hands are those of snowflakes, easy to melt, and forever seeking a safe place where reality never intrudes.

The Ottoman queen who practiced the art of the deal

In the early 16th century, long before the advent of newspapers, one of the few sources for breaking news was the confidential correspondence carried on by sophisticated Italian diplomats and financiers.

This Nov. 11, 2017 photo shows the a view of the La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The open-air market is a nightmarish panorama of animal blood, body parts and detritus. It's also an essential part of the economy of the Haitian capital, supplying meat to restaurants, street vendors and stores.(AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

Borders aren't racist, and some countries are sh--holes

- The Washington Times

Some countries truly are sh--holes -- and that's why the citizens who live there want to come to America so badly. But America's government has a responsibility to secure the future of its own citizens first -- and sorry, so sorry, anti-Trumpers of the world: That's. Not. Racism.

President Donald Trump pauses during a prison reform roundtable in the Roosevelt Room of the Washington, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Trump haters have their next distraction

- The Washington Times

Democrats this morning are on a mass tantrum, taking to the media to outdo themselves with the best shock and awe impression they can muster over President Donald Trump's "sh--hole" comment -- the same comment Trump now denies, via Twitter, saying. Thing is: Democrats really don't care what Trump said. They only care about how they can use what they said to attack him politically.

Luis Gutierrez, go home

- The Washington Times

Rep. Luis Gutierrez took to national television to call out President Donald Trump as a neo-Nazi and KKK leader. Gutierrez should go home. And not to the cushy, cozy home of his fellow anti-American elites in Illinois, but rather to Puerto Rico, his home of descent, the home he oh-so-proudly hails from while making political points against conservatives -- the home he mentally channels while dinging the president as a racist and a bigot and an enemy of the poor.

In this Jan. 9, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. Trump used profane language Thursday, Jan. 11, as he questioned why the U.S. should permit immigrants from certain countries, according to three people briefed on the conversation. The White House did not deny the comment. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump's 'sh--hole' remark reason he was elected

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump reportedly suggested the United States shouldn't take in immigrants from Haiti or other "s---hole countries" because they do little to bolster an America First agenda -- and now the world is on fire, tittering about racism and vulgarities and the foul-mouthed impoliteness of this White House commander-in-chief. But really folks, this is why Trump was elected in the first place.

Beijing must stop flights now

At a time when the two Koreas are seeking to defuse tension through talks, Beijing's unilateral launch last week of controversial aviation routes constituted a provocation undermining regional security. On Jan. 4, China launched the northbound M503 flight route along with three east-west extension routes — without prior negotiations with Taiwan. We solemnly protest this reckless behavior, which raises concerns over cross-Strait stability and regional aviation safety.

DACA good for politicians, not Trump

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) executive order isn't good for working-class America. It's a matter of simple supply and demand: More people available for jobs means lower wages and benefits for all. So why are politicians from both parties trying to jam it down our throats?

Barry Goldwater campaigning in 1964. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sorehead losers of 2016 suggest a familiar solution

- The Washington Times

President Trump goes in for his annual physical Friday, and the doctors will only look at things like his blood pressure, listen to his heart, bang on his knees with a little rubber mallet and turn him around for the ever-popular prostate exam.

Illustration Wind Power by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

A blow for energy security

The Trump administration took a blow this week from its own Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which ruled against further subsidies to financially ailing coal and nuclear plants. The blow was deserved.

In this June 5, 2017, photo, a worker stacks merchandise outside a Walmart in Salem, N.H. Walmart is boosting its starting salary for U.S. workers to $11 an hour, giving a one-time $1,000 cash bonus to eligible employees and expanding its maternity and parental leave benefits. The retailer said Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, changes to its compensation and benefits policy will impact more than a million hourly workers in the U.S., with the wage increase effective next month. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

Tax cuts hit home

"Don't cut corporate taxes," they said. "The riches will only be used for share buybacks and executive perks," they said. "The workers won't actually benefit," they said. It's already looking like "they" didn't know what they were talking about.

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence sgreets troops in a hangar at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan on Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017. Mandel Ngan/Pool via AP) **FILE**

Looking for help on the Afghanistan problem

The West cannot solve the problem of Afghanistan alone. The U.S. and its European allies can treat the symptoms, but they can only stave off the absolute disaster for a period of time, at the cost of much blood and treasure.