Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

A page from a Gutenberg Bible. (The Washington Times) ** FILE **

The wounded printed page strikes back

- The Washington Times

Fake news is everywhere, cluttering desktops, iPads, laptops, iPhones and all the other manifestations of the post-literate era when it’s just too much trouble to find a reliable read.

Ambassador Faith Whittlesey poses Nov. 16, 1985 in Geneva, Switzerland. Representative diplomatic official spokeswoman. (AP photo/Michele Euler)

Remembering Faith Ryan Whittlesey

Early in 1983, an attractive young woman I did not know grabbed my sleeve as I was leaving a meeting on Central America in the White House Cabinet Room. She stuck her card in my hand. It read, “Ambassador Faith Ryan Whittlesey, Assistant to the President for Public Liaison.” On the back she had penned, “Call me! You need my help.”

Illustration on examining the FISA court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Questioning accountability on the secret court

Story after story comes out about the extent to which partisan politics played a key role in the Obama Department of Justice (DOJ), intelligence community and FBI during the 2016 presidential campaign. It’s especially so in the context of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, and the more recent suggestions of a “mole” or “spy” inside the Trump campaign.

Illustration on the effects of recent tax cuts by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why liberals hate the Trump tax cut

Despite liberal hysterics, Republicans’ recent tax cut raised top earners’ share of America’s tax burden. This seemingly “squared circle” is simply due to a fact true before the legislation and even truer after: Middle- and upper-income earners shoulder the overwhelming tax load. Equally obvious: Even so large a share is not enough for an insatiable left.

Illustration on Russia's history of state breaking by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s love affair with state-breaking

In Russia’s long-term war against the West that includes the infiltration of domestic political systems, blackmail and the indirect influence of elected officials through “ethnic political organizations,” one of its most prized and enduring tactics is its exploitation of ethnoreligious rivalries and fissures within the states along its borders.

Related Articles

Sessions Oath Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The disingenuous genius of Jeff Sessions

It is no mystery that most who work inside the Beltway don't like President Trump. He is an outsider and nationalist, while those on both sides of the aisle in Congress are globalists who listen more to their K Street providers than they do their constituents. The two new world dictators — Xi Jinping of China and Vladimir Putin of Russia — are confirmed nationalists, and while the former praises globalism for the benefits it has gained his country, both men want globalism, but only on their terms, not those of the West.

Illustration on the EMP threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Short-circuiting the electromagnetic threat

Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) is a major threat to the continued existence of America. An enemy could destroy our nation simply by detonating a single nuclear weapon above the atmosphere over our country. All our enemies, including some terrorist groups, have, or can acquire, this capability. The electromagnetic pulse from this detonation would destroy our national electric power grid, and it would take many months or years to rebuild it. Without electricity, virtually all our everyday life-support systems would remain paralyzed, and millions would die of disease or starvation.

Illustration on the increasing viability of cryptocurrencies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward a better cryptocurrency

Why do people want "money?" Obviously, so they can buy goods and services now or in the future. But, in actuality, it is not money people want, but purchasing power. Is it necessary to have a stock of money to have purchasing power? Well no, provided people have credit or wealth that can be turned into a transferable unit of account in close to real time.

Illustration on Trump's effect on world political norms by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The new art of the deal

In a recent column, I spoke of the two current forms of populism and how they're challenging the "Liberal International Order," the governing philosophy that has guided the U.S. use of power in the service of freedom for ourselves and our allies since World War II. The question is, where does President Trump's form of populism fit into what might be called the new version of the Liberal International Order?

Growing divide contributes to violence

Once again the nation is subjected to violence in our schools — and once again we hear partisan cries for "gun control" as the solution. No, this is not the solution. The danger is that it clouds recognition of many factors that contribute to increased violence, principally the constant hysterical attacks on our president, which undermines national stability. Youngsters are easily influenced by a hatred-filled atmosphere.

At last, justice for Hillary?

The real investigations concerning Hillary Rodham Clinton and her boss have finally begun ("Trump 'takes charge' of deep state influence," Web, May 20). Stay tuned. The supposed investigation of Russian collusion will be found only to apply to Mrs. Clinton and those high up at the FBI, Justice Department and more. Special Counsel Robert Mueller was only there to postpone the inevitable after the shocking election result.

In this Jan. 21, 2018, file photo, lights shine inside the U.S. Capitol Building as night falls in Washington. (AP Photo/J. David Ake) ** FILE **

A privilege, not a right

No nation is more confused over who, why and how someone may cross its borders than the "nation of immigrants." America's confusion is largely the work of men and women who would get lost on a highway with no exits. Common sense, an uncommonly precious leadership quality, is the compass that points the way toward an immigration policy based on respect for the law. Common sense, alas, suffers a sharp discount in our present day.

How honored glory came to a soldier known but to God

On a wintry day in October 1921, Army Lt. Arthur E. Dewey knelt on the muddy turf alongside one of the hundreds of crosses in a U.S. military burial ground in Thiaucourt, France.

A number of factors are contributing to climbing prices at the pump. (Associated Press/File)

Trump's market-based energy policy opens gates to production, innovation

Gas station signs are showing some discouragingly high numbers these days, with gas prices nationally now averaging $2.84 a gallon -- up 40 cents from a year ago and the highest mark since 2014. Meanwhile, U.S. producers are pumping out more crude oil than they have in nearly 50 years. What gives?

A petition has been launched to persuade veteran actor and political provocateur James Woods to run for California governor this year. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

James Woods faults Dems for school insecurity

- The Washington Times

James Woods, one of the few conservatives in Hollywood, sent out a scathing tweet about Democrats and their blocking of common-sense measures that could secure our nation's public schools from shooting attackers. Like how? Like pressing for gun-free zones, for example.

In this Wednesday, May 16, 2018, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump waves from the White House, in Washington. In a series of tweets Sunday, May 20, 2018, Trump skims over the facts involving the investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Donald Trump: 'Drain the Swamp!' And he is

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump is poised to officially demand a federal investigation into whether the Department of Justice "infiltrated or surveilled the Trump Campaign for Political Purposes," as he put it. And that means, once again, he is putting his mockers to shame.

What Obama and his political Choom Gang did is far worse than Watergate

- The Washington Times

At the end of all the scandal and drama, all of the breathlessly reported lies and false accusations, at the end of all the money wasted on some zany kabuki swamp dance choreographed to the thrumming of giant bullfrogs and yipping of excited coyotes — at the end of all of this — it comes down to precisely what we said it was a year and a half ago.

A shot from Tampa Bay Lightning center Cedric Paquette gets past Washington Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby for a first-period goal during Game 5 of the NHL hockey Eastern Conference finals Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Jason Behnken)

LOVERRO: Braden Holtby holds key to Capitals' fate

The Capitals can dominate, but are not dominant in the most important moments. The Capitals can play well, but they cannot sustain success. The Capitals are capable of winning, but seem far more comfortable folding. The answer? It's been the same since this round of the playoffs started -- Braden Holtby.

Illustration on Chinese pilfering of U.S. medical R&D by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Negotiating better trade agreements

President Trump is now hot and heavy in the trade negotiations with China, as well as Canada and Mexico in negotiating NAFTA 2.0. We are strong free traders, but we also believe that Mr. Trump's plans to negotiate better trade agreements that reduce trade barriers abroad are right on the mark. He also has to make sure those deals fully protect U.S. intellectual property, or what is commonly called know-how.

Illustration on Trump's Socratic method by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Donald Trump's Socratic method

While the press likes to portray President Trump as impetuous and impatient with details, when it comes to important decisions, he usually weighs options carefully.

University Goat Petting Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pursuing God, or petting goats

It is finals week at colleges and universities across the nation, and the University of Maine at Orono just announced a brilliant plan: It is providing a herd of goats for students to feed and pet in order to help them — presumably the students, not the goats — get through the stress of final exams.