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Illustration on the aggressive strategic future of Syria by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The new ‘great game’ in Syria

In the second half of the 19th century, the British and Russian empires competed for domination of Central Asia in what history labels “The Great Game.” A new “great game,” with the entire Middle East at stake, is now being played out in Syria. The opponents are Russia and Iran on one side and the U.S. and Israel on the other. Both sides will try to use Arab states and Turkey as pawns.

Logical Progression of a Gun Ban Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More laws do not a moral people make

This past Valentine’s Day, Nikolas Cruz entered a classroom in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and proceeded to murder 17 people and wound 15 others. Before any meaningful criminal investigation could even begin, our nation’s cultural elites rushed to their respective podiums, finding fault and casting aspersions. Scoring political points is the name of the game. Removing personal rights embedded in our Constitution and replacing them with more laws and less freedom seems to be the only way they know to keep score.

Chart to acccompany Moore article of Feb. 19, 2018.

Obama’s real debt and deficit legacy

- The Washington Times

Congressional Republicans have been raked over the coals in the last two weeks for slamming through budget caps and inflating government spending and debt by another $300 billion. The criticisms are well deserved.

Unrest in India Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

India’s democracy and Modi’s reforms

If there’s one thing we’ve learned about Prime Minister Narendra Modi is that he’s not afraid of using radical maneuvers to accomplish his economic agenda for India.

Kim Yo-jong, sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, arrives at the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018. (Associated Press)

The snookered press at Pyeongchang

- The Washington Times

When Kim Jong-un dispatched his crack propaganda team to Pyeongchang (and not P.F. Chang, the Chinese restaurant chain, as reported by NBC News) to cover the Winter Olympics, he couldn’t have imagined that the American media in town would have been so easy to con.

Illustration on history repeating itself in U.S. involvement in Afghanistan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How Afghanistan can take the road not taken in Vietnam

We haven’t heard much about Afghanistan in the news lately. Occasionally, an American will be killed, or there will be a bombing, but the current U.S. strategy of the “Afghanization” seems to have produced a stalemate that is not necessarily a bad thing.

Patent Law Working Properly Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Patent reform and innovation

On February 5, the Senate confirmed Andre Iancu as director of the Patent and Trademark Office.

Illustration on Mongolia's desire to separate from China by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Divided, Mongolia cannot stand

A celebrity and business tycoon being elected president. A man whose campaign touted nationalism, with a slogan of putting the nation “first.”

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with North Korean defectors where he talked with reporters about allowing the release of a secret memo on the FBI's role in the Russia inquiry, in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) ** FILE **

The perilous Trump budget

After promising voters in 2016 that he would balance the budget, President Trump has proposed a $4.4 trillion spending plan for fiscal year 2019 that is dangerously unbalanced.

Illustration on the national debt by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Don’t worry about the national debt

“If something cannot go on forever, it will stop,” said Herbert Stein, President Nixon’s chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors. America’s national debt has grown from 32 percent of GDP in 1981 to 68 percent in 2008 and 108 percent in 2017. The national debt is high, and some components are growing on autopilot. Still, Washington keeps adding to it.

This Feb. 19, 2013, file photo shows OxyContin pills arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. The maker of the powerful painkiller said it will stop marketing opioid drugs to doctors, a surprise reversal after lawsuits blaming the company for helping trigger the current drug abuse epidemic. OxyContin has long been the worlds top-selling opioid painkiller and generated billions in sales for privately held Purdue. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)

Opioid regulation not the way to fight ODs, cure addiction

- The Washington Times

The country’s gone head-over-heels nuts on opioids, the drug of effectiveness for long-time pain sufferers. As if cracking down on producers, distributors, insurers and sellers will cure the underlying roots of addiction — the psychological and emotional factors that lead to a practice of self-destruction.

Illustration on the downsides of bipartisanship by Linas Garsys/the Washington Times

The downside of bipartisanship

The House and Senate’s passage of “a two-year budget deal,” (plus an appropriation to avoid a “government shutdown” for a month, during which the details of that deal may be negotiated) is news because the “deal” spends 13.5 percent more for the coming two fiscal years than the Obama administration had proposed for them, and expands the government at an unprecedented rate. By comparison, President Obama was a conservative. Who’d a thunk it?

FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2018, file photo, Chinese and American flags fly outside of a JW Marriott hotel in Beijing. Politics weighs more heavily on foreign companies in China than it has in nearly three decades, as companies face pressure on many sides from Chinese President Xi Jinping's more nationalistic stance and twin campaigns to tighten the ruling Communist Party's political control and have it play a more direct role in business. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)

How to counter a deliberate Chinese confrontation

Aside from failing to provide any meaningful support to curb North Korea’s destabilizing nuclear weapons programs, China continues with its bullying and aggressive tactics to advance its totalitarian control of both the South and East China Seas. China’s claims to nearly all of the South China Sea clash with those of Taiwan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia and Brunei — but only China is trying to impose control on the whole region.

Related Articles

Illustration on the media's view of Logan Act "violations" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the media plays favorites with the Logan Act

- The Washington Times

Anyone who doubts that the media plays favorites need look no further than the way pundits embraced the idea that Donald Trump's transition team members probably violated the Logan Act by talking to foreign officials before their man was sworn in as president and compare it to the way those same pundits have ignored recent contacts former Secretary of State John Kerry has had with officials of the Palestinian authority in the Middle East.

Illustration on "America First" trade policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trade that must be 'fair and reciprocal'

As President Trump remarked in his recent State of the Union speech, the United States will no longer surrender to its trading partners, "[we] expect our trading relationships to be fair and reciprocal." In his speech, Mr. Trump highlighted the administration's spectacular achievements in its first year. From tax reform to judicial nominations, a strong economy to a stock market at record highs, no president has completed more in their first year in office than President Donald Trump.

Elephant in the oom Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

North Korea's charm offensive

North Korea's invitation to President Moon Jae-in to visit Pyongyang for a summit with Kim Jong-un was not unexpected. North Korea seized the opportunity to attend the Winter Olympics in South Korea as part of a unified Korea Team. Sending the leader's sister, Kim Yo-jong, to accompany the North's nominal head of state, Kim Yong-nam, was a gracious gesture to the South and a masterful political decision. Kim Yo-jong captured the attention of the South Korean media and carried herself very well — smiling, attentive and modest.

Migrant Investment Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Congress must reform immigration

If President Trump is serious about wanting to shape immigration policy to be part of his plan to make American great again, there is at least one category of immigrant he should urge Congress to expand — the EB-5 visa program.

Illustration on proposed "heartbeat" legislation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Seeking protection for the unborn

There is a bill that will protect more human lives than any bill ever passed in Congress. It has 170 co-sponsors. It is supported by hundreds of national pro-life organizations and leaders. But there is one group standing in the way of the bill which will protect millions of unborn babies — the National Right to Life Committee (NRLC).

The President's FY19 Budget is on display after arriving on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Feb. 12, 2018. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The pretense of budget control

The Trump budget looks a lot like the budgets Barack Obama drew up. There's no way an economist with his head on straight would defend the indefensible maneuvering of Congress and the president over the past several days.

A Horatio Alger story with an American twist

In an era of conspicuous consumption and loud-mouthed overstatement, it's nice to read about a financial titan who was modest, soft-spoken and whose word was his bond. Such a man was Kirk Kerkorian, the son of an ambitious but illiterate Armenian immigrant who managed to make and then lose a small fortune in California agricultural ventures. By the time his son Kerkor (who early on anglicized his first name to "Kirk") became an eighth grade dropout, he knew that he would have to make it entirely on his own.

Obamas' painter pick, a racist

The unveiling of the Obamas' official portraits this week rightfully has generated the criticism this racist couple richly deserves ("Official Obama portraits unveiled at National Portrait Gallery," Web, Feb. 12). To commission a painting of Mrs. Obama by artist Kehinde Wiley, who has painted pictures of black women holding the severed heads of white women is outrageous and reveals the double standard of decency acceptable to liberals and the mainstream media.

The pretense of budget control

The Trump budget looks a lot like the budgets Barack Obama drew up. There's no way an economist with his head on straight would defend the indefensible maneuvering of Congress and the president over the past several days.

In a Jan. 17, 2007, file photo, Donald Trump Jr., left, and his wife Vanessa arrive for the Trump Vodka launch party by Drinks America hosted by Donald J. Trump at Les Deux in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles. Donald Trump Jr.'s wife was taken to a New York City hospital as a precaution Monday, Feb. 12, 2018, after she opened an envelope addressed to her husband that contained an unidentified white powder, police said. (AP Photo/Danny Moloshok, File)

#VanessaTrump peppered with leftist hate -- but love conquers

- The Washington Times

They say love overcomes all -- but at #VanessaTrump, the Twitter hashtag that started in response to Vanessa Trump's receipt of an envelope of white powder, the adage is really being put to the test. Look at this lovely post, from Amanda Butler, @sweethunni1976: "It was cornstarch for the love of god. Probably sent it to themselves to deflect from all the real bs going on in Washington. #VanessaTrump." Nice.

Former first lady Michelle Obama and artist Amy Sherald, right, unveil Michelle Obama's official portrait at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, Monday, Feb. 12, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Michelle Obama finally 'grateful'

- The Washington Times

Former first lady Michelle Obama is finally humbled, honored and -- get this -- grateful. It only took an unveiling of her official portrait at the National Portrait Gallery to bring her to that state.

George Soros. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A new world order coming to a theater near you

- The Washington Times

The picture should start to come clear any day now. The London Express, which often reports things that nobody else has heard of, not even on the internet where there are no editors and anything goes, reports that the Illuminati is real and is secretly running the world from behind the scenes.

Bipartisan Act Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Drowning in debt

In "Hamlet," Shakespeare pens one of the most familiar lines — and best advice — ever written. Before Laertes leaves for Paris, his father, Polonius, tells him: "Neither a borrower nor a lender be "

Illustration on infrastructure spending by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Funding infrastructure with 'MAGA Bonds'

President Trump in the campaign of 2016 and now as president has set forth the priority to build, repair and maintain America's crumbling infrastructure to the tune of $1 trillion.

Illustration on the opioid crisis in America by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping the promise of confronting the drug crisis

Wisely, the president is taking time selecting leaders for remaining senior posts, methodically vetting, setting expectations, assuring quality and loyalty. Among posts likely to be nominated early in 2018 — those that affect the nation's drug crisis. America needs that crisis leadership, now.