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Former President Richard Nixon. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

An Olympian break in the war between the words

- The Washington Times

A few Ping-Pong balls broke the Cold War ice around China a generation ago, following Richard Nixon’s stunning trip to Beijing (when it was still called Peiping), and soon the United States and China were on their way to normal diplomatic relations.

Illustration on the recent nuclear alarm in Hawaii by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Hawaii error and liberal hysteria

Murphy’s Law was written to describe how governments work. It was proved yet again on January 13 when an employee of the Hawaii Emergency Management System sent a cellphone alert that said, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” The alert was false but until it was corrected almost 40 minutes later it terrified millions of residents and tourists.

Illustration on protecting aborted babies delivered alive by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Giving the smallest patients equal protection under the law

Doctors today routinely diagnose and treat a myriad of conditions, illnesses and diseases suffered by society’s littlest patients — unborn babies and newborns — significantly enhancing both their health and longevity.

Illustration on GOP political dangers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When politicians exploit inequality

For Republicans, it’s dangerous to focus on the moment — accusations that President Trump is a racist, DACA and avoiding government shutdowns — but the more enduring threat to the GOP’s grip on power are charges of insensitivity about inequality.

Illustration on unintended Democrat sabotage of DACA legislation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The fate of the Dreamers

Donald Trump probably shouldn’t have suggested — not in public, at least — that Haiti and other nations that send refugees and immigrants to the United States are “s-holes.” It’s not only demeaning; it adds insult to injury.

Rep. John Culberson, Texas Republican, said, "The time is right" to consider a return to earmarks. He is pushing for a test run so Congress can prove it can be responsible. (Associated Press/File)

The trouble with earmarks

Nearly a year after President Trump was sworn into office on a campaign pledge to “drain the swamp,” he now wants Congress to reopen the spending spigots again.

Illustration on high tech's deleterious effects on commerce by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Big Tech chameleon

Twenty years ago, no one had heard of either Facebook or Google, neither of which existed yet. For that matter, no one knew much about social media or search engines in general.

"I'm not a racist. I'm the least racist person you will ever interview," said President Trump told reporters as he met with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, California Republican (left). The furor grew out of an immigration discussion at the White House on Thursday where Mr. Trump allegedly made vulgar comments. (Associated Press)

‘Trump’s a racist’ — Marcia, Marcia, Marcia

- The Washington Times

There comes a point when calling a spade a spatula becomes a bit worn and wearying and the public starts to catch on and actually notice and say, hey, that’s a spatula, not a spade. In other words: People start to doubt the message is actually true.

Taxpayer Money Lost in  Space Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The hidden fees of SpaceX

No one likes hidden fees. From unauthorized phone charges to home closing costs and prepaid card levies, they take a toll on low and middle-income Americans. To mitigate consumer outrage, members of Congress often demagogue unknown expenditures like ATM and airline baggage fees in committee hearings; costs which usually do not amount to more than a few dollars.

Uncle Sam Watching You Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The undoing of limited government

Late last week, Rep. Devin Nunes, California Republican, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, repeated his public observations that members of the intelligence community — particularly the CIA, the NSA and the intelligence division of the FBI — are not trustworthy with the nation’s intelligence secrets. Because he has a security clearance at the “top secret” level and knows how others who have access to secrets have used and abused them, his allegations are extraordinary.

Illustration on China's dam building frenzy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China’s dam frenzy

China’s hyperactive dam building is a reminder that, while international attention remains on its recidivist activities in the South China Sea’s disputed waters, it is also focusing quietly on other waters — of rivers that originate in Chinese-controlled territory like Tibet and flow to other countries. No country in history has built more dams than China. In fact, China today boasts more dams than the rest of the world combined.

Related Articles

Illustration on an alliance between Irael and Saudi Arabia by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A secret Middle East alliance

A Swiss newspaper, Basler Zeitung, reported recently that a secret alliance between Israel and Saudi Arabia aimed at restraining Iran's imperial desire for a land mass between Tehran and the Mediterranean was moving into a new phase. While there aren't formal diplomatic ties between the two countries, military cooperation does exist. In fact, the Saudi government sent a military delegation to Jerusalem several months ago to discuss Iran's role as a destabilizing force in the region.

Illustration on supporting the Iranian uprising by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to support the Iranian uprising

The current Iranian "man in the street" uprising provides the United States with a unique opportunity to achieve what should be one of our core vital national security objectives: the removal of the Iranian theocracy from power. Why? Because the Iranian theocracy has been at war with the United States for over 38 years. They have caused the death of thousands of Americans, both civilian and military.

Perpetual Motion Money Machine Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing in a scorching market

Stocks have just accomplished a Houdini — scorching to record highs while escaping volatility. The S&P 500, which accounts for 80 percent of the value of publicly traded U.S. companies, just scored an unprecedented 14 consecutive monthly gains.

Chart to accompany Emily Baker article of Jan. 16, 2018.

Small businesses and government contracts

With the sixth round of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) negotiations set to begin in Canada later this month, news reports claim that Canadian negotiators are increasingly worried that the U.S. may unilaterally quit the agreement — something that President Trump can do with the stroke of a pen.

Trump's comment not racist

A lot of people are taking President Trump's "sh—hole countries" comment out of context and cashing in on it for their own glory ("Hillary Clinton condemns Trump's 'ignorant,' 'racist' 'sh—hole' comment," Web, Jan. 12). I am an African, and I can tell you, Mr. Trump is not a racist. Those calling him one are the racists. For instance, will all those whites calling him a racist allow their children to marry black people? Or will they welcome black sons- and daughters-in-law in their houses? How many black people occupy significant positions in their employ? These are questions for thought.

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at the National Governors Association special session called "Collaborating to Create Tomorrow's Global Economy" in Providence, R.I., July 14, 2017. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press via AP) ** FILE **

A lesson from Canada

Talking the talk is easy. Walking the walk is not so easy. Justin Trudeau, the prime minister of Canada, thought he could take a shot at the Americans, and Donald Trump in particular, for its determination to get out-of-control immigration under something resembling control. Lesson apparently learned.

Left needs new election message

I have a suggestion for the National Democratic Party's 2018- and 2020-election message. Back in 1987, I heard Bill Clinton give a speech in which he said something I really agreed with. He said people have rights and responsibilities. Yet Democrats, he said, seem to focus too heavily on their own "rights" and seem to believe that they shouldn't (and don't) have any "responsibilities." By contrast, he said, Republicans seem to focus too heavily on their "responsibilities" and seem to believe that they shouldn't and don't have any "rights."

When terrorists kidnap, and the options for redress

Since the 1960s, Israel has been extorted by Palestinian terrorist organizations holding Israeli soldiers and civilians hostage, with Lebanese terrorist groups joining in the kidnapping-for-ransom epidemic of Israelis, including Westerners and other nationals in the early 1980s.

In this image made from video released by KRT on Jan. 1, 2018,  North Korean leader Kim Jong-un speaks in his annual address in undisclosed location, North Korea. (KRT via AP Video)  ** FILE **

Democratic dopiness: Lawmaker blames U.S. for North Korea nukes

- The Washington Times

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, a Hawaii Democrat, took to "This Week" on ABC to say that it's America's fault North Korea has nuclear designs. This is typical Democrat logic -- defending chaos and evil at all costs and pointing fingers at any source that detracts from leftist, progressive culpability.

In this Nov. 25, 2014, file photo, protesters vandalize a police vehicle outside of Ferguson city hall in Ferguson, Mo. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Blacks can be racist, too

- The Washington Times

Charles M. Blow, a black New York Times columnist, just wrote a piece for his newspaper that's bluntly titled, "Trump Is a Racist. Period." He arrives at that conclusion by simply saying it -- as if saying something conclusively makes it so.

CORRECTS SPELLING TO DIGGS NOT RIGGS Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Stefon Diggs (14) celebrates in the end zone after a game winning touchdown against the New Orleans Saints during the second half of an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. The Vikings defeated the Saints 29-24. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

LOVERRO: Stefon Diggs, NFL give us a game for history

And now the world will wake up Monday morning to the greatness of Stefon Diggs, who pulled down a dramatic game-winning catch with the clock running down to zero and led the Vikings to a 29-24 come-from-behind victory over the New Orleans Saints that they will talk about for years in the land of 10,000 lakes.

Illustration on the penumbra of Constitutional interpretation and abortion by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The deceitful road to abortion

After Roe v. Wade plaintiff Norma McCorvey became a Christian and revealed that she had not been gang raped as her legal team had claimed, many Americans came to understand that this landmark ruling that legalized abortion was based on a lie.

Unfair Trade Practices in Commercial Air Travel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trade cheating in the Middle East

Last month, President Trump laid out his foreign policy doctrine in a speech that emphasized economic security as a key piece of America's national security policy. He called for "trade based on the principles of fairness and reciprocity" and "firm action against unfair trade practices."

Influence of Tax Rates Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why taxes matter after all

One premise of modern-day "progressives," is that taxes don't have much influence on how much and when people invest, how much they work and save, or where they live. Just Google "Taxes don't matter" and you will find scores of academic studies and news stories assuring us that taxes have little or no effect on behavior.

In this Oct. 18, 2017 photo, Collinsville High School Latin teacher James Stark speaks to students in his classroom in Collinsville, Ill. Stark views his students' well being as his top priority. Teaching Latin is somewhere down the list. Stark has been a teacher for three years. At 24 years old, he was named the 2017 Illinois Latin Teacher of the Year by the Illinois Classical Conference. His students say they think of Room 225, the Latin classroom, as a sanctuary. (Derik Holtmann /Belleville News-Democrat, via AP)

When student teachers are shunned

The Oklahoma Council for Public Affairs reports that a collective bargaining group representing public schools in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, is calling for a boycott of student teachers from the local Christian university. The reason for the proposed shunning? Oklahoma Wesleyan University's president (yours truly) dared to suggest that the bad ideas presently being taught in our nation's schools might, at least in part, be responsible for the bad behavior we are seeing in our national news.

Illustration on New York's climate lawsuit by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

New York's silly climate suit

On January 10, the city of New York filed suit against BP, Chevron, Conoco-Phillips, ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch Shell. The suit accuses oil companies of causing dangerous climate change and damage to New York City, seeking monetary compensation. But history will rank this action high in the annals of human superstition.