Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

In this April 21, 2018, file photo, people watch a TV screen showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The signs read: "North Korea says it has suspended nuclear tests." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

A summit imperiled by Rocket Man’s travel tribulations

- The Washington Times

“Just getting there, as Cunard once boasted of transatlantic crossings by ship, “is half the fun.” The Atlantic is still there, but ocean liners are not, and almost the only way to cross the ocean sea now is by air. That’s no fun at all. Dining aboard an ocean liner has been replaced by dining aloft, and you’re lucky to get a pretzel or a stale cracker.

Illustration on the Syrian situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What’s next in Syria

Western civilization — in the guise of its three leading powers — struck back at international lawlessness when they hit Syrian chemical sites on April 13. It remains to be seen whether the strike had the desired effect of deterring the Syrian leadership from the further use of such weapons. If it does, President Trump’s claim of “mission accomplished” will be justified. That brings up the key question of “what next?” if chemical weapons use continues.

Unlocked from Poverty Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Unlocking America’s full potential

Thanks to tax reform, deregulation and America’s can-do spirit, our economy is strong. Unemployment is at its lowest level since 2000, wages are rising, and businesses are bringing jobs back to the United States. Despite these tremendous economic gains, we have yet to unlock America’s full potential.

Mike Pompeo. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democratic terror of a miracle in North Korea

- The Washington Times

Trying to spark a new romance, or even arrange a weekend tryst, is not always easy. It’s impossible with the help of spectators eager to throw things, not orange blossoms but sticks and stones with sharp edges. But that’s how Washington tries to conduct diplomacy, circa 2018.

Illustration on Taiwan's contributions to world health by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Taiwan must be seated at the World Health Assembly

The constitution of the World Health Organization (WHO) notes that “the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition.” Yet WHO withheld, as last year, an invitation for Taiwan’s participation in May as an observer in the annual World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva, Switzerland.

Sale of Unmanned Aerial Systems to Our Allies Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A win for America and its allies

Our allies and partners want to “buy American.” They know U.S. industries produce the most technologically sophisticated and effective defense systems in the world. When our allies and partners are better equipped to defend themselves, there is greater regional peace and stability — and far less need for American service members to be in harm’s way.

Like Trolls to the Flame Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the patent system stronger

Appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week, the new director of the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO), Andrei Iancu, stressed his office’s focus on enhancing innovation through a strong, reliable and predictable patent ecosystem. All of us want a system that supports innovation by maximizing patent quality and minimizing patent granting mistakes. But how?

Illustration on fiscal responsibility and spending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Budget blame where it belongs

While tax cuts take the budget blame, spending does the debt damage. Proponents of big government spending are happy to stoke the latest story in the narrative that America is under-taxed.

Related Articles

Illustration on Scott Walker in Wisconsin by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wisconsin's long political winter

- The Washington Times

As the temperature in Washington edged up toward 80 over the weekend, Madison and most of the rest of Wisconsin was fighting one of the worst snowstorms that had hit the state in years. Motorists were warned to stay off the roads. Snow, wind and temperatures in the teens or lower made one question whether spring is, in fact, just around the corner.

The Tarmac Meeting Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Clintons and the rule of law

Former Obama Attorney General Loretta Lynch, in a NBC interview last Monday, reopened a can of worms. In the interview, Ms. Lynch defended her private meeting with Bill Clinton back on June 27, 2016.

Online Gambling Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How online gambling lures the most vulnerable

With the rise of cheating bots, the potential for money laundering and terrorism financing, and most recently, the revelation that Kim Jong-un maintains an online gambling hacker army to help fund his regime in North Korea, the integrity of virtual casino style games has long been in question. Now, skepticism has spread to the online gambling corporations themselves. Earlier this month, our very worst fears about the predatory practices of these corporations were confirmed in a new expose by Business Insider. Screenshots obtained by the publication reveal how internet casinos actively lure the most vulnerable among us.

In this Jan. 21, 2018, file photo, lights shine inside the U.S. Capitol Building as night falls in Washington. (AP Photo/J. David Ake) ** FILE **

New threat to tax cuts

Congressional Democrats are campaigning for control of Congress in November on a pledge to repeal the recent tax reform tax cuts. That would increase taxes on working people and their employers, taking back the jobs, bonuses, pay raises, and economic growth and recovery that tax reform is already producing.

A timely warning on the dangers of political tribalism from both the left and the right

There are many things the liberal establishment can't come to terms with. Reality is one. Amy Chua -- the best-selling author most famous for her "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother" -- is another. It's not that Ms. Chua is a conservative. She isn't. And it certainly isn't because she is a white, male chauvinist Trump supporter. She's an Asian-American, a woman , a law professor at Yale, and anything but a fan of The Donald.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban speaks during an international press conference in the Parliament building in Budapest, Hungary Tuesday, April 10, 2018, two days after his Fidesz party in coalition with the Christian Democratic Party won a landslide vitory in the general elections. (Lajos Soos/MTI via AP)

Teaching Europe about democracy

Critics know what's wrong with the European Union. It suffers from what they call a "democratic deficit." Democracy is often loud, usually messy and everyone gets a voice. This is inconvenient for the elites and the bureaucrats.

Comey's firing was overdue

Consider former FBI Director James F. Comey's demonstrations of "A Higher Loyalty" to Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and Loretta Lynch. Mr. Comey complied with Ms. Lynch's urging that the Clinton email "investigation" be termed a "matter." Mr. Comey acceded to Peter Strzok's changing of Mr. Comey's description of Hillary Clinton's handling of highly classified emails on her unsecured private server from "grossly negligent" to "extremely careless," thereby avoiding the incriminating wording of 18USC793(f)(1).

Free speech doesn't bar critique

The First Amendment reads, in part: "Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech." Thus Laura Ingraham's comments about Parkland, Florida, student David Hogg were in fact protected in the sense that no law prohibited her from saying those things. However, Ms. Ingraham was not protected from others using their own freedom of speech to criticize her. To say free speech is taking a hit because one does not agree with another person's speech is an invalid argument because the First Amendment does not protect speech from criticism or disapproval ("Free speech takes another hit," Web, April 4).

This 2014 image released by ABC shows George Stephanopoulos anchor "Good Morning America," in New York. Stephanopoulos' "Good Morning America" exchange with White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders on Monday, March 6, 2017, is the second time in a month that the ABC anchor had a notably sharp interview with a Trump administration official. (Lou Rocco/ABC via AP)

Is George Stephanopoulos held to the 'Hannity Standard'?

- The Washington Times

Given the new Hannity Standard I'd think ABC News' would disclose on every segment involving the Clintons that Stephanopoulos was a former Senior Adviser to President Clinton, former White House Communications Director under Bill Clinton and continues to be a close associate with the Clinton family and their foundation. Right? Wouldn't you think?

A photo of Lieutenant Colonel Arnaud Beltrame placed on a bunch of flowers at the main gate of the Police headquarters in Carcassonne, France, Saturday, March 24, 2018, following an attack on a supermarket in Trebes in the south of the country on Friday. A French police officer who offered himself up to an Islamic extremist gunman in exchange for a hostage died of his injuries, raising the death toll in the attack to four, and the officer was honored Saturday as a national hero of "exceptional courage and selflessness." (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

France's futile hope to 'reform' Islam

- The Washington Times

So France, feeling the pinch and reeling from its umpteenth terror attack in recent times -- a police officer was just killed by a gunman who claimed ties to ISIS -- has now announced a new pitch to pacify the radicals of Islam and help integrate them into courteous society. Good luck with that.

In this Aug. 15, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump points to members of the media as he answers questions in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) ** FILE **

Trump is winning -- that's why the left is unraveling

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump rode into office on the wings, in part, of a promise to clean up the Deep State, drain the swamp and boot from places of influence those who've worked behind the scenes to undo America's greatness, one unconstitutional usurpation at a time. It must be working. How else to explain how nuts the left's been acting of late?

Chart to accompany Rahn article of April 17, 2108.

Problems in protecting intellectual property rights

Prague is a glorious city with many beautiful and historic buildings going back nearly a thousand years. It managed to escape almost all bombing during WWII, and thus was able to preserve the best of its past -- to the delight of both citizens and tourists. I am here at the European Resource Bank for a discussion of the problems in protecting intellectual property (more on that below).

Former FBI Director James Comey. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Still waiting for the garlic bullet

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump called James Comey a "slimeball," which is not a very presidential way to talk. But just this time we might have to forgive the president. James Comey really is a slimeball. Just about everybody says so.

ADVANCE FOR USE MONDAY, AUG. 21, 2017 AND THEREAFTER-A man shouts across the Wishkah River while incoherently talking to himself at Kurt Cobain Memorial Park in Aberdeen, Wash., Tuesday, June 13, 2017. Grays Harbor County lands near the top of all the lists no place wants to be on: drugs, alcohol, early death, child abuse, runaway rates of welfare that pull some out of poverty but trap others in a cycle of dependency. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Welfare reform again

When President Bill Clinton signed the welfare reform act in 1996, which he negotiated with House Speaker Newt Gingrich, the left claimed people would starve. They didn't. According to the nonpartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, between 1996 and 2000, the employment rate for single mothers increased from 63 percent to 76 percent.

Arab Realignment Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran, the Palestinians' seductive ally

Alliances between nations as well as between nations and non-state actors appear and disappear, pushed by the tides of history and geopolitics.

Illustration on John Bolton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

America in good hands

Former U.N. Ambassador John Bolton is exceptionally qualified to serve as President Trump's National Security Adviser, and I fully support his selection. He has the right mix of expertise on the complex international security threats we face, the leadership experience to coordinate input from multiple federal departments and agencies involved in our national security policy and the strong communication skills to be a spokesman for the president on critical security matters.

Syria Strike Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Strike on Syria--who really won

President Trump and his national security team deserve high praise for their recent action in attacking Syrian chemical weapons facilities. They did everything right. Not only was it well-justified and timely, the president and his team did not rush into an attack but waited several days to evaluate the intelligence from various sources, develop attack options that met the president's specific objective, and form a coalition with key allies Great Britain and France for the strike.

In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, left, and Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., both members of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, GOP strategy session at the Capitol in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

A new Speaker

Paul Ryan shocked no one, at least no one who was paying attention, when last week he announced he would not seek re-election to the House of Representatives and would leave the Speaker's chair when his term is up in January.