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Rebecca Hagelin

The ‘holiday’ is Christmas

Just as the Jewish people and so many gentiles missed the true Jesus at the time of his life on earth, America as a “Christian nation” misses Jesus today.

Cutting Through Obama Red Tape Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump’s year in review

On Thanksgiving Day, President Trump took to Twitter to remind Americans how much they had to be thankful for during his first year in office, citing a soaring stock market, a “record” cut in regulations, and the “lowest unemployment in 17 years.” Was the president’s self-issued report card accurate?

Illustration of the Mississippi Gopher Frog by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘The Case of the Missing Frog’

Sherlock Holmes it isn’t. But Weyerhaeuser v. United States Fish and Wildlife Service, a case seeking review by the Supreme Court, could be called, “The Case of the Missing Frog.” In this amphibian equivalent of an Arthur Conan Doyle mystery, the government seeks to seize control of land it does not own, to protect an endangered species of frog that does not live there, force private landowners to tear down a healthy native forest, and install at landowner expense a new forest the landowner does not want.

Mirror Tax Cut Plans Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What John F. Kennedy and Donald Trump have in common

Last week during an address at the White House President Trump likened his tax plan to “the tax cut that John F. Kennedy proposed 55 years ago.” This elicited some howls of protest from Mr. Trump’s liberal critics who say it’s historically inaccurate to compare the Trump plan to JFK’s.

Illustration on the hopes generated by Christmas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Always winter but never Christmas

In C.S. Lewis’ “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,” there is a scene where we find the children standing fearful and confused in a land that is frozen and nearly lifeless. A lamppost stands somberly in a windless forest that is blanketed with snow and the few creatures the children do encounter are frightened and paranoid.

Illustration on the end of Net Neutrality regulations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Network neutrality comes to an end

They finally did it. After six months of debate, during which it received over 23 million public comments (of which half may have been fraudulent), the Federal Communications Commission voted on Dec. 14 to eliminate the network neutrality rules it imposed on broadband network operators during the Obama era.

Illustration on Hanukkah by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hanukkah, the first battle against transnationalism

Many think of Hanukkah as a fight for religious freedom. While religious freedom was at stake, it was part of a broader battle in behalf of the concept of national identity. The Maccabees, local Judeans who spearheaded the revolt against the overpowering northern Syrian Greeks, and who inspired the grass-roots, did so for the overarching cause of retaining Judea’s identity and Jewish character, which was under assault by those trying to denude Judea of its distinctiveness.

Illustration on global harmony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

People, planet and climate working together

Another year of weather is coming to a close. Even with some record-breaking snowfall from this past weekend’s storm in the eastern U.S., in many ways weather this year was not much different from any other year since the regular recording of temperature, precipitation and wind began across much of the globe 150 years ago.

Trump Administration Record on School Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping his promise about school choice

During the 2016 presidential campaign, candidate Donald Trump spoke passionately and often about school choice. Some school choice advocates, however, are beginning to rumble about the lack of progress on this key domestic policy promise. This grumbling has been building for some time among “talking heads” in the think-tank world.

Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off the stage with wife Kayla Moore after he spoke to supporters after an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. Moore didn't concede the election to Democrat Doug Jones. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

What Roy Moore’s defeat portends

There were plenty of reasons why Republican Roy Moore’s defeat in the scandal-plagued Alabama election was a blessing for the GOP, despite losing a seat in a closely divided Senate.

Illustration on the GOP and the death penalty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Republicans reconsidering the death penalty

The mere idea of Republicans sponsoring death penalty repeal bills in great numbers was once considered an unlikely notion. However, Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty recently released a report revealing how Republicans are championing measures to end capital punishment at never-before-seen rates.

Doug Jones is greeted by a supporter before speaking during an election-night watch party Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. Jones has defeated Republican Roy Moore, a one-time GOP pariah who was embraced by the Republican Party and the president even after facing allegations of sexual impropriety. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Doug Jones — and Trump’s life just got a lot harder

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has been beating a dead horse in Congress for almost a year now, trying to pass his agendas legislatively through a Senate that’s dominated by Republicans yet consistently falls to Democratic Party will because of an ever-looming threat of filibuster. It’s only going to get tougher for Trump. Prepare for the stalled and even dropped legislation.

Illustration on Iranian influence in the Persian Gulf region by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s indirect strategy for regional influence

Last month, Yemen’s Houthis, the Iranian-supported rebel faction that now dominates the southern Persian Gulf’s most volatile state, fired a ballistic missile that came close to the Saudi capital, Riyadh, before being intercepted by the country’s military. The incident was a clear sign of the deepening sectarian conflict between Tehran and Riyadh now taking place throughout the Middle East. But it was also an accurate reflection of the sort of asymmetric tactics being prioritized by Iran in its strategy for regional dominance.

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In this Feb. 26, 2017, file photo, host Jimmy Kimmel appears at the Oscars in Los Angeles. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

Jimmy Kimmel's shameless cart of kid to stage as political prop

- The Washington Times

Jimmy Kimmel, who'd been missing in action from work for a week, made a triumphant return to the late-night stage with his little 7-month-old son Billy, who'd just finished with a long heart surgery ordeal. That'd be fine -- touching even -- if Kimmel hadn't then took a slight turn down Propaganda Lane and started preaching the pros of taxpayer-funded health care and cons of the conservatives who still resist it.

A detail of the baby Jesus is seen in a Nativity scene in the East Room during a media preview of the 2017 holiday decorations at the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Colleges push hard for Christ-free Christmases

- The Washington Times

College administrators around the country, it seems, are rushing to acquiesce to even the most minor of voices on campuses to make sure the "C" word -- that's "C" for Christmas, shhh! -- doesn't cause angst in some offended student's ears. Basically, they're driving hard to drive out the reason for the season, Jesus Christ.

Gloria Allred. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Big media's sad and extremely horrible week

- The Washington Times

Newspapermen were rarely whiners. Whining became fashionable only after "journalists" overran newsrooms. The best newspapermen, so the folk wisdom went, were Southerners, Jews and the Irish.

The IRS goes after Bitcoin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the remedy is more destructive than the disease

The U.S. government once again proved that it does foolish and destructive things by trying to impose a tax that actually loses money. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) demanded information from a San Francisco bitcoin exchange about who was buying and selling bitcoins. The IRS claims that bitcoins and other digital/cryptocurrencies are property and thus subject to a capital gains tax on any price increases and other reporting requirements when bitcoin is used in transactions. It seems that the IRS discovered that in 2015 only 802 people declared bitcoin-related losses or gains, despite tens of millions of transactions (I am willing to bet that most of these folks reported losses, which are deducible).

In this Dec. 5, 2017, file photo, former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a campaign rally in Fairhope Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

No king but Caesar

In September 1862, a group of Chicago ministers sent a "memorial" (or long letter) to President Abraham Lincoln in which they made a theological argument for the elimination of slavery.

Illustration on the growing threat of nuclear crisis with North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Discounting the North Korea threat countdown

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, speaking to the Reagan National Defense Forum on Dec. 2, offered up a doomsday prediction. When asked how close the United States and North Korea are to war, Mr. McMaster replied, "It's increasing every day." Sen. Jim Inhofe, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, seconded that statement in even more distressing language: "It is important for us here in the Senate to communicate to the American people the credible, grave, and immediate threat that we face . We don't have the luxury of time."

Illustration on The Washington Post's treatment of Judge Roy Moore by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Molested by the media

You don't have to be a fan of Alabama's Republican senatorial nominee Roy Moore to see that the Furies in the media aren't willing to cut him a break even when his most lethal accusers have been caught falsifying the record. The late Charles Manson seems to have gotten a more sympathetic press. For the past two months, the "Never Moore" media have tried to sink the judge by insisting his dating of teenage girls when he was in his 30s was scandalous on its face, even when they were of age, their mothers approved and the women themselves conceded he never engaged in sexual misconduct.

Illustration on Roy Moore's run for the Senate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Roy Moore and the politics of winning

It now looks as if Roy Moore, the Republican candidate for the Senate in Alabama, will win his race, despite the publicity about his alleged improper behavior with a 14-year-old girl 38 years ago, and maybe others young girls as well.

FILE - In this May 7, 2015, file photo, labor union members and supporters rally for better wages in New York. Nearly 2 million New York workers are unionized. New York's powerful labor unions are lining up against a constitutional convention, warning voters that opening up the state's main governing document could lead to the erosion of worker protections and rights such as collective bargaining. In November 2017, New Yorkers will be asked whether to hold a convention, where delegates would consider big changes to the constitution. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Reining in the worker center end run

Is it the beginning of the end for Big Labor's henchmen? You'd be forgiven if you think I'm referring to the Hoffas. I'm actually talking about so-called worker centers, which have recently been the labor movement's bludgeon — all while avoiding federal rules on union transparency and conduct.

The Dome of the Rock Mosque in the Al Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem's Old City is seen while a Jewish orthodox man reads from a holy book in a cemetery in Jerusalem, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, a day after U.S. President Donald Trump's recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

President Trump's capital idea

President Trump's announcement that the United States would recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital changes everything, and nothing. On the one hand, it is simply a recognition of reality and U.S. law. More than two decades ago Congress enacted a law requiring the State Department to recognize Jerusalem as the Israeli capital, and to move the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv, the Israeli commercial capital, to Jerusalem.

In this De. 6, 2017 photo, Rep. Luis Gutierrez D-Ill., third from left, along with other demonstrators protest outside of the U.S. Capitol in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and Temporary Protected Status (TPS), programs, during an rally on Capitol Hill in Washington.  House and Senate Democrats stand divided over whether to fight now or later about the fate of some 800,000 young immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

No appeasing the ingrates

Anyone who expects gratitude for a good deed displays only an ignorance of how humans tick. The best way to make an enemy is to do someone a good turn, which often creates not gratitude but resentment. This home truth was on display the other day when 200 ingrates and their enablers rallied on the steps of the Capitol to demand that Congress enact "Dream Act" legislation to protect "undocumented" would-be immigrants brought to this country by their parents, who broke the law to get them to these shores.

Breaking codes and ciphers during World War II

Of all the nonbattle technical accomplishments of World War II, perhaps the most important was the ability of the Allies to break coded messages of enemies and put the results to deadly use.

Brown no friend to sex-abuse victims

As a survivor of countless clergy sex-abuse crimes and cover-ups in the state of California, I recognize the religious threat and intimidation tactic that Gov. Jerry Brown is using ("Trump doesn't 'fear the wrath of God,' complains Jerry Brown," Web, Dec. 9).

'100 in '50' a green pipe dream

It's hard to believe that so many climate heavy hitters, some of whom are professors, share the delusion that wind- and solar-power generation can replace 100 percent of coal and natural-gas generation by 2050. ("Stanford professor's defamation lawsuit puts chill in atmosphere of climate scientists," Web, Dec. 6). Instead of exchanging argumentative papers and suing each other, both sides involved in this fight should just do the math. It tells us that there are three reasons why "100 in '50" is a delusion, and that wind and solar won't get us there. In short, we don't have enough time, money or land.

Tom Kelly and Peshmerga officer at a domed shelter hospital in Iraq. (Photo from Tom Kelly)

Level the Playing Field for Kurds in the fight against Terrorism

After receiving a sizeable inheritance from Rosie Kelly, his mother, retired American football coach Tom Kelly decided to do what he could to help the Kurdish Peshmerga, Christians and Yezidis in their battle against the Islamic State (ISIS).