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Illustration on the growing threat of nuclear crisis with North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Discounting the North Korea threat countdown

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, speaking to the Reagan National Defense Forum on Dec. 2, offered up a doomsday prediction. When asked how close the United States and North Korea are to war, Mr. McMaster replied, “It’s increasing every day.” Sen. Jim Inhofe, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, seconded that statement in even more distressing language: “It is important for us here in the Senate to communicate to the American people the credible, grave, and immediate threat that we face . We don’t have the luxury of time.”

A detail of the baby Jesus is seen in a Nativity scene in the East Room during a media preview of the 2017 holiday decorations at the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Colleges push hard for Christ-free Christmases

- The Washington Times

College administrators around the country, it seems, are rushing to acquiesce to even the most minor of voices on campuses to make sure the “C” word — that’s “C” for Christmas, shhh! — doesn’t cause angst in some offended student’s ears. Basically, they’re driving hard to drive out the reason for the season, Jesus Christ.

Illustration on The Washington Post's treatment of Judge Roy Moore by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Molested by the media

You don’t have to be a fan of Alabama’s Republican senatorial nominee Roy Moore to see that the Furies in the media aren’t willing to cut him a break even when his most lethal accusers have been caught falsifying the record. The late Charles Manson seems to have gotten a more sympathetic press. For the past two months, the “Never Moore” media have tried to sink the judge by insisting his dating of teenage girls when he was in his 30s was scandalous on its face, even when they were of age, their mothers approved and the women themselves conceded he never engaged in sexual misconduct.

Illustration on Roy Moore's run for the Senate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Roy Moore and the politics of winning

It now looks as if Roy Moore, the Republican candidate for the Senate in Alabama, will win his race, despite the publicity about his alleged improper behavior with a 14-year-old girl 38 years ago, and maybe others young girls as well.

FILE - In this May 7, 2015, file photo, labor union members and supporters rally for better wages in New York. Nearly 2 million New York workers are unionized. New York's powerful labor unions are lining up against a constitutional convention, warning voters that opening up the state's main governing document could lead to the erosion of worker protections and rights such as collective bargaining. In November 2017, New Yorkers will be asked whether to hold a convention, where delegates would consider big changes to the constitution. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Reining in the worker center end run

Is it the beginning of the end for Big Labor’s henchmen? You’d be forgiven if you think I’m referring to the Hoffas. I’m actually talking about so-called worker centers, which have recently been the labor movement’s bludgeon — all while avoiding federal rules on union transparency and conduct.

Illustration on the risks of the Middle-East peace process by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good Luck, Jared Kushner

Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, and Jason Greenblatt, formerly one of the president’s real estate lawyers, are pursuing what the president calls the “ultimate deal,” a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. We should wish them luck because they’re going to need it.

Illustration on Trump's abiding political philosophy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Liberty, equity and fraternity

There’s a move to define Donald Trump as a populist, so as to link him to some of the nastier people in American politics, like Pitchfork Ben Tillman, Father Coughlin and David Duke.

Illustration on improvements to the GOP tax plan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Five ways to improve the tax bill

The Senate-passed tax bill is a policy triumph that will provide a shot of performance enhancing drugs into the veins of the economy. It’s not perfect, but the combined effect of cutting business tax rates, eliminating the state and local tax deduction, and repealing the ObamaCare individual mandate tax, means we are at the precipice of the biggest conservative policy victory since the Reagan years.

Stained Glass Badge Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The courage to judge

The Washington Surgi-Clinic in Washington, D.C. is now on record saying that, for a modest fee, it will perform a late-term abortion on a healthy, viable baby boy or girl.

With the deadline looming to pass a spending bill to fund the government by week's end, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., meets reporters following a closed-door strategy session, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Tougher challenges than cutting taxes

Passing tax reform in record time will prove a significant accomplishment, but it pales by comparison to the challenges Republicans must tackle next.

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The Crony Castes of India Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When greed meets globalization

America's latest Clinton scandal — the 2010 sale of U.S. uranium to a Russian-controlled mining company, which allegedly benefited the Clinton Foundation to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars — has reminded me of the old proverb that says the love of money is the root of all kinds of evil.

FILE - In this Nov. 8, 2017 file photo, Vice President Mike Pence speaks in Floresville, Texas. Pence will be keynoting two days of Republican Governors Association meetings beginning Wednesday, Nov. 15, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

The Mike Pence puzzle

To the titans of wisdom, morality and politics (as a bunch of little guys of press and tube think of themselves), Mike Pence is a puzzlement. They just can't get a handle on the man.

In this Aug. 29, 2016 photo, Marilyn Smolenski uses a mock gun to demonstrate how to pull a handgun out of the concealed carry clothing she designs at her home in Park Ridge, Ill. Interest in clothing that allow women to carry a firearm concealed is rising. Pioneers in the industry say they allow women to avoid looking frumpy and still carry a firearm safely and effectively. (AP Photo/Tae-Gyun Kim)

Liberating good guys with guns

The right to self-defense is fundamental to a free people. So says the Second Amendment, and Americans hearing it loud and clear are the proud owners of guns enough to arm nearly every man, woman and child. When ne'er-do-wells turn their weapons against the innocent, it's responsibly armed citizens who must provide defense in the absence of the police. That's why rules that force concealed carry permit holders to leave their firearms at home when they travel are foolish rules. Congress must finish the job of empowering the good and responsible man and woman with a gun.

Real meaning of 'white Christmas'

There are two things we might want to think about this holiday season: a "white" Christmas and the coming of Santa Claus. A "white" Christmas is not about snow. It's about spiritual purity at the second coming of Jesus Christ, which Santa's coming represents. Santa's red clothing represents the blood Jesus shed for our sins, which only He can make "white." Where the Christmas favorite "Santa Claus is Coming to Town" says "He knows if you've been bad or good ... you better watch out," it's talking about our spiritual condition. God knows where we have all fallen short of His glory.

An unsettling tale of letting happiness slip by

One doesn't have to read very far into this novel to realize that Victor Forde, Mr. Doyle's unhappy protagonist, doesn't believe in much of anything, either. As he tells us in what may or may not be the words of a trustworthy narrator, Victor is -- was -- semi-famous throughout Ireland for two things.

Freed killer will just return

It is marvelous that killer and illegal alien Jose Zarate was not convicted of murder because, of course, his victim, Kate Steinle, was merely was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

In this Nov. 9, 2017, photo, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Nancy Pelosi's idea of 'Armageddon' is a GOP tax bill

- The Washington Times

Armageddon, biblically speaking, is the sign of the end of times -- the be-all and end-all of battles, the one that pits good against evil and ushers in a period of humanly devastations unlike any ever before experienced. But to Nancy Pelosi, the House's highest-ranking Democrat, Armageddon is the Republican tax bill.

People sleep outside of the Supreme Court in order to save places in line for Dec. 5 arguments in 'Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission,' Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, outside of the Supreme Court in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Supreme Court travel ban ruling a return to reason

- The Washington Times

Citizens from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Chad -- terror hotspots, all -- and North Korea, as well as segments of Venezuela, are now barred from entering the United States, thanks to a Supreme Court ruling on President Donald Trump's executive attempt to secure the nation and stop the flow of potential terrorists across the borders. Finally, a court ruling with reason.

Colin Kaepernick attends the 2017 ACLU SoCal's Bill of Rights Dinner at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel on Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

Colin Kaepernick, bogus hero of the left

- The Washington Times

Colin Kaepernick is riding high, having just won the Sports Illustrated Muhammad Ali Legacy Award as well as the American Civil Liberties Union's Eason Monroe Courageous Advocate Award -- honors bestowed, respectively, for sportsmanship and bravery. But Kaepernick is possessed of neither. He's more a tool -- a tool of false leftist beliefs.

James Comey. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Robert Mueller's mighty tuna shrinks to a goldfish

- The Washington Times

Robert Mueller has the heart of a Las Vegas hooker and the guile of a New Orleans stripper. Not to push the metaphor too far, he's skilled at showing a little skin in a cloud of satin and lace, but never quite comes across with what the customer is paying for.

Bitcoin and Government Monopoly Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The end of government monopoly money

After two centuries of government monopoly money, private monies are re-emerging and will likely come to dominate ultimately. Back in 1976, Nobel Laureate F.A. Hayek published his little classic, "Denationalization of Money." In essence, Hayek argued that money is no different than other commodities, and it would be better supplied by competition among private issuers than by a government monopoly. His book detailed the problems with government monopoly money and how most of these problems could be overcome with private competition.

Illustration on reducing the size of government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Starving the beast

One way to kill a predatory animal is to deny it sustenance. The tax-cut bill passed by the Senate, if it clears a conference with the House and President Trump signs it, may be the first step toward starving the big-government beast.

Artistic freedom in a cake at stake

Jack Phillips is an artist. He has always loved drawing, sculpting and painting. Designing custom wedding cakes allowed him to do all three in a setting that inspired him as a person of faith. And Jack excelled at his work. The local newspaper called his shop "an art gallery of cakes," and his designs received acclaim from the well-known wedding website The Knot.

Illustration on three major Washington types by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Lawyers, liars and horndogs

Washington has always had lots of lawyers — it's the very nature of this power town; lots of liars — it's the very nature of politics; and, as we have recently discovered, yet again, lots of real horndogs — it's the very nature of power politics.

Facebook Addiction Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The false premise of Facebook addiction

In an interview with Axios, Facebook cofounder Sean Parker revealed the founders purposefully created a social network that's addictive: "God only knows what it's doing to our children's brains."

Too many patents approved by the U.S. Patent and Trade Office have been revoked by administrative law judges at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, inventors say. (Associated Press/File)

Stacking the patent deck against inventors

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in the patent case Oil States Energy Services, LLC v. Greene's Energy Group, LLC. In many ways, the future of American innovation hangs in the balance.