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Thinking Differently Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A fresh wind in the Middle East

For decades Saudi leaders expressed in vituperative fashion an animus to the state of Israel as an illegal entity in what is assumed to be Arab land. While King Salman reaffirmed a steadfast position on the Palestinian issue and the legitimate rights of the Palestinian people to Jerusalem as their capital, he made an astonishing claim that the Jewish people have a right to a “nation state in at least part of their ancestral home.” On its face this may not seem as much, but based on commentary over the last 70 years this comment is extraordinary.

Illustration on copyright protection by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Copyrights and patents, piracy and theft

April 26 is World Intellectual Property Day — a day too little-noticed in most quarters but which shouldn’t be.

In this April 21, 2018, file photo, people watch a TV screen showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The signs read: "North Korea says it has suspended nuclear tests." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

A summit imperiled by Rocket Man’s travel tribulations

- The Washington Times

“Just getting there, as Cunard once boasted of transatlantic crossings by ship, “is half the fun.” The Atlantic is still there, but ocean liners are not, and almost the only way to cross the ocean sea now is by air. That’s no fun at all. Dining aboard an ocean liner has been replaced by dining aloft, and you’re lucky to get a pretzel or a stale cracker.

Illustration on the Syrian situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What’s next in Syria

Western civilization — in the guise of its three leading powers — struck back at international lawlessness when they hit Syrian chemical sites on April 13. It remains to be seen whether the strike had the desired effect of deterring the Syrian leadership from the further use of such weapons. If it does, President Trump’s claim of “mission accomplished” will be justified. That brings up the key question of “what next?” if chemical weapons use continues.

Apprenticeship Programs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Over-investing in higher education

After decades worrying about a shortage of good-paying jobs, America has too many — manufacturing, construction and increasingly service businesses can’t find the qualified workers needed to expand. This is a significant barrier to permanently restoring 3 percent to 4 percent growth so that the nation can meet the needs of an aging population, finance its commitments to defend freedom — through our military and costly instruments of soft power — and invest in infrastructure and R&D without becoming dangerously indebted.

A first step for health reform

It’s beginning to look like the Republicans have pretty much abandoned their promise to “repeal and replace” Obamacare. Considering they don’t have the votes to do it this does not come as a big surprise. If they want to remain in power though, they have to come up with something.

Targeting Handguns Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The left’s war on self-defense

In Arizona, there is a special election to replace Rep. Trent Franks, who resigned earlier this year. Making special appearances to help the Democrat in that race are the kids from Parkland, Florida.

Illustration on Kim Jong-un's diplomatic wish list by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What Kim Jong-un really wants

If one were to make a list of “what Kim really wants” in his discussions with the U.S., such would be quite straightforward, however — at least so far — they have not been expressed as such.

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Illustration on the FBI's reaction to Jim Comey's book    The Washington Times

The G-men and their emojis

Once upon a time in a previous century I was invited to watch a widely banned movie, "I Am Curious Yellow," in company with a number of FBI agents and officials to see just how naughty it was. I had written about censorship and whether the movie was over the line of decency.

Barbara Bush Photo Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Barbara Bush, one of a kind

A beautiful person, no other way to say it. Barbara Bush was one of a kind, pushing through challenges most lives never see, with a hallmark smile, clear eyes and unwavering faith.

The Birth of a New Economic Recovery Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The optimists may be right

In January, Wall Street investors were optimistic tax cuts would sustain economic growth and the Trump bull market. As spring arrives, the world has proven decidedly more uncertain.

William Wachtel holds up a mock Social Security card of President-elect Donald Trump as he speaks to members of the media following a meeting with Trump at Trump Tower in New York, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A fresh start for a beleaguered agency

It seemed like it would never happen. But after more than five years, a formal nomination of a Social Security commissioner will finally be considered by the U.S. Senate. This is a long overdue development. The delay of a nomination, however, pales compared to the wait a million Americans continue to endure for a hearing that will decide if they will receive the Social Security disability benefits they earned while working.

Illustration on the costs of Elon Musk's Space X by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The crony capitalist in free market clothing

You might imagine that pro-capitalism, free-market folk like me would just love what Elon Musk has done in the past couple of decades but you'd be wrong. I enjoy his entrepreneurial spirit and success, founding company (zip2) after company (PayPal) after company (The Boring Co.) and turning them into properties worth billions and then moving along to the next new thing. Props and kudos to this son of South Africa and prototype for "Iron Man." You got those parts right.

President Donald Trump gestures during a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump's private Mar-a-Lago club, Wednesday, April 18, 2018, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump and the attorney-client privilege

A few weeks ago, President Trump was an outwardly happy man because of the utterance of one solitary word from the lips of special counsel Robert Mueller to one of Mr. Trump's lawyers. The word that thrilled the president and his legal team was "subject."

The Capitol Dome of the Capitol Building at sunrise, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018, in Washington. After another government shutdown, congress has passed a sweeping long term spending bill which President Donald Trump is expected to sign later this morning. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Dancing around the budget

The typical congressman just can't help himself. He's the grown-up kid who fished his daddy's credit card out of his pants pocket while Daddy slept, and he has been the big man on the high-school campus since. This lack of self-restraint was further demonstrated last week when a vote on a balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution failed once more.

Sports unite us all

Major League Baseball's honoring last weekend of the 71st anniversary of Jackie Robinson integrating the sport reminded me of the Brooklyn Dodgers, Ebbets Field and Hank Greenberg. It was a time when men and women of all ages, classes, races and religions commingled in the stands, rooting for Jackie Robinson and his teammates, regardless of their ethnic origin, game after game.

Bolton has work cut out

We can all agree with Martha McSally that the choice of John Bolton as President Trump's national security adviser is a good one ("America in good hands," Web, April 16). While applauding the choice, though, let us not go overboard in our praise too quickly. Mr. Bolton prepares to undertake a herculean task.

When 'The Bomb' prevented a war

Will historians ever acknowledge that the atomic bomb, despite its horrors, stands as the most effective anti-war weapon in history?

In this Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017, file photo, Jordan Peele poses for a portrait at the SLS Hotel in Los Angeles. (Photo by Rich Fury/Invision/AP)

Barack Obama fake news video highlights dangers of AI

- The Washington Times

Fake news, meet artificial intelligence. A video created by Oscar-winning filmmaker Jordan Peele and released by BuzzFeed appears to show Barack Obama referencing the movie "Black Panther," remarking on HUD Secretary Ben Carson and calling President Donald Trump a "total and complete dips--." But it was all fake. And get ready for the floodgates to open on more AI-assisted fake videos and audio.

This image released by CBS shows former FBI Director James Comey, left, with host Stephen Colbert on "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert," Tuesday, April 17, 2018 in New York. (Scott Kowalchyk/CBS via AP)

James Comey should lay low: 46 percent want him prosecuted

- The Washington Times

James B. Comey, former FBI director, is facing fire from the people, apparently, for his brazen attacks on President Donald Trump, for his outspoken criticisms of White House ways of doing business and -- for leaking to the media. Rasmussen Reports found in a recent survey 46 percent of those polled think Comey ought to be prosecuted for leaking to the press.

In this Sept. 13, 1991, file photo, then-first lady Barbara Bush, her granddaughter Barbara, and Millie wait on the steps of the White House for U.S. President George H.W. Bush to return from his check-up at Bethesda Naval Hospital in Washington. A family spokesman said Tuesday, April 17, 2018, that former first lady Barbara Bush has died at the age of 92. (AP Photo/Barry Thumma, File )

Barbara Bush -- even Chuck Schumer noted her 'grace and class'

- The Washington Times

Barbara Bush, the "silver fox" of modern-day politics -- so-dubbed for her snowy white hair and cut-to-the-chase manner of speaking -- has died, leaving a legacy that will be talk of the town for the next few days. Even the left is grieving her passing. And in this day and time of vicious politicking -- that ain't small potatoes.

Illustration on options in Syria by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Middle East missions to accomplish

Can we at least agree that President Trump's decision to strike three chemical weapons facilities owned and operated by Bashar Assad — vassal of the Islamic Republic of Iran and Russia — was consistent with American values?