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Illustration on the end of Net Neutrality regulations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Network neutrality comes to an end

They finally did it. After six months of debate, during which it received over 23 million public comments (of which half may have been fraudulent), the Federal Communications Commission voted on Dec. 14 to eliminate the network neutrality rules it imposed on broadband network operators during the Obama era.

Illustration on Hanukkah by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hanukkah, the first battle against transnationalism

Many think of Hanukkah as a fight for religious freedom. While religious freedom was at stake, it was part of a broader battle in behalf of the concept of national identity. The Maccabees, local Judeans who spearheaded the revolt against the overpowering northern Syrian Greeks, and who inspired the grass-roots, did so for the overarching cause of retaining Judea’s identity and Jewish character, which was under assault by those trying to denude Judea of its distinctiveness.

Illustration on global harmony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

People, planet and climate working together

Another year of weather is coming to a close. Even with some record-breaking snowfall from this past weekend’s storm in the eastern U.S., in many ways weather this year was not much different from any other year since the regular recording of temperature, precipitation and wind began across much of the globe 150 years ago.

Trump Administration Record on School Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping his promise about school choice

During the 2016 presidential campaign, candidate Donald Trump spoke passionately and often about school choice. Some school choice advocates, however, are beginning to rumble about the lack of progress on this key domestic policy promise. This grumbling has been building for some time among “talking heads” in the think-tank world.

Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off the stage with wife Kayla Moore after he spoke to supporters after an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. Moore didn't concede the election to Democrat Doug Jones. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

What Roy Moore’s defeat portends

There were plenty of reasons why Republican Roy Moore’s defeat in the scandal-plagued Alabama election was a blessing for the GOP, despite losing a seat in a closely divided Senate.

Illustration on the GOP and the death penalty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Republicans reconsidering the death penalty

The mere idea of Republicans sponsoring death penalty repeal bills in great numbers was once considered an unlikely notion. However, Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty recently released a report revealing how Republicans are championing measures to end capital punishment at never-before-seen rates.

Doug Jones is greeted by a supporter before speaking during an election-night watch party Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. Jones has defeated Republican Roy Moore, a one-time GOP pariah who was embraced by the Republican Party and the president even after facing allegations of sexual impropriety. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Doug Jones — and Trump’s life just got a lot harder

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has been beating a dead horse in Congress for almost a year now, trying to pass his agendas legislatively through a Senate that’s dominated by Republicans yet consistently falls to Democratic Party will because of an ever-looming threat of filibuster. It’s only going to get tougher for Trump. Prepare for the stalled and even dropped legislation.

Illustration on Iranian influence in the Persian Gulf region by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s indirect strategy for regional influence

Last month, Yemen’s Houthis, the Iranian-supported rebel faction that now dominates the southern Persian Gulf’s most volatile state, fired a ballistic missile that came close to the Saudi capital, Riyadh, before being intercepted by the country’s military. The incident was a clear sign of the deepening sectarian conflict between Tehran and Riyadh now taking place throughout the Middle East. But it was also an accurate reflection of the sort of asymmetric tactics being prioritized by Iran in its strategy for regional dominance.

An open process for revamping net neutrality

While the pall of scandals and alleged scandals in the nation’s capital may have many voters thinking of the Beltway as a dysfunctional wasteland, the reality is that much of the machinery of government is, in fact, going full throttle trying to create jobs and spur growth. Only you wouldn’t know it from the daily news cycle.

Invisible Political Hand Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The invisible hand of economics

The invisible hand of American presidential politics is economics. Almost imperceptibly guiding the electorate, no other issue is as determinant of a presidency’s success. Currently, it is supporting Donald Trump through his political problems and could push him to re-election, as it has so many others.

In this Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson, file)

Drain the education swamp: College students’ tyrannical behavior must be stopped

How many conversations have we had with our friends, family and co-workers wondering what happened to the millennials? We expect a new generation to have new ideas and new ways of approaching the world. So how do we explain when a new generation is steeped in bullying, complaining about hurt feelings, demanding “safe spaces,” and using pride in fragile egos and weakened emotional states as the excuse to condemn free speech?

Illustration on China's role in diffusing the North Korean nuclear threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Nobody’s fool over North Korean nukes

Our news-hack kids — or, as Obama chief spinner Ben Rhodes called them, the “27-year-old know-nothings” — don’t have a clue as to the operative history of the North Korean nuclear threat to Asia, the Pacific and the United States.

Related Articles

In this De. 6, 2017 photo, Rep. Luis Gutierrez D-Ill., third from left, along with other demonstrators protest outside of the U.S. Capitol in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and Temporary Protected Status (TPS), programs, during an rally on Capitol Hill in Washington.  House and Senate Democrats stand divided over whether to fight now or later about the fate of some 800,000 young immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

No appeasing the ingrates

Anyone who expects gratitude for a good deed displays only an ignorance of how humans tick. The best way to make an enemy is to do someone a good turn, which often creates not gratitude but resentment. This home truth was on display the other day when 200 ingrates and their enablers rallied on the steps of the Capitol to demand that Congress enact "Dream Act" legislation to protect "undocumented" would-be immigrants brought to this country by their parents, who broke the law to get them to these shores.

Breaking codes and ciphers during World War II

Of all the nonbattle technical accomplishments of World War II, perhaps the most important was the ability of the Allies to break coded messages of enemies and put the results to deadly use.

Brown no friend to sex-abuse victims

As a survivor of countless clergy sex-abuse crimes and cover-ups in the state of California, I recognize the religious threat and intimidation tactic that Gov. Jerry Brown is using ("Trump doesn't 'fear the wrath of God,' complains Jerry Brown," Web, Dec. 9).

'100 in '50' a green pipe dream

It's hard to believe that so many climate heavy hitters, some of whom are professors, share the delusion that wind- and solar-power generation can replace 100 percent of coal and natural-gas generation by 2050. ("Stanford professor's defamation lawsuit puts chill in atmosphere of climate scientists," Web, Dec. 6). Instead of exchanging argumentative papers and suing each other, both sides involved in this fight should just do the math. It tells us that there are three reasons why "100 in '50" is a delusion, and that wind and solar won't get us there. In short, we don't have enough time, money or land.

Tom Kelly and Peshmerga officer at a domed shelter hospital in Iraq. (Photo from Tom Kelly)

Level the Playing Field for Kurds in the fight against Terrorism

After receiving a sizeable inheritance from Rosie Kelly, his mother, retired American football coach Tom Kelly decided to do what he could to help the Kurdish Peshmerga, Christians and Yezidis in their battle against the Islamic State (ISIS).

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks to members of the media after a pipe bomb strapped to a man went off in a New York City subway near Times Square on Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in New York. Mayor Bill de Blasio stands fourth from left. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

New York City terror, the 'new normal' for America

- The Washington Times

New York City was in rush-hour chaos Monday, as an ISIS-inspired terrorist detonated an improvised explosive device -- a pipe bomb affixed to his body with wire tie-type fasteners -- in the heavily traveled Port Authority Bus Terminal in Manhattan. And with that, officials started selling the idea that this is now part of American life.

Indianapolis Colts quarterback Jacoby Brissett looks to throw during the second half of an NFL football game against the Buffalo Bills, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, in Orchard Park, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jeffrey T. Barnes)

The NFL's Hail Mary

Faced with plummeting attendance and TV ratings over its boneheaded unwillingness to require its millionaire players to at least stand during the national anthem, the National Football League brain trust has come up with another beauty: Let's throw millions of dollars at left wing political causes.

Illustration on the risks of the Middle-East peace process by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good Luck, Jared Kushner

Jared Kushner, President Trump's son-in-law, and Jason Greenblatt, formerly one of the president's real estate lawyers, are pursuing what the president calls the "ultimate deal," a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. We should wish them luck because they're going to need it.

Illustration on Trump's abiding political philosophy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Liberty, equity and fraternity

There's a move to define Donald Trump as a populist, so as to link him to some of the nastier people in American politics, like Pitchfork Ben Tillman, Father Coughlin and David Duke.

Illustration on improvements to the GOP tax plan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Five ways to improve the tax bill

The Senate-passed tax bill is a policy triumph that will provide a shot of performance enhancing drugs into the veins of the economy. It's not perfect, but the combined effect of cutting business tax rates, eliminating the state and local tax deduction, and repealing the ObamaCare individual mandate tax, means we are at the precipice of the biggest conservative policy victory since the Reagan years.

Stained Glass Badge Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The courage to judge

The Washington Surgi-Clinic in Washington, D.C. is now on record saying that, for a modest fee, it will perform a late-term abortion on a healthy, viable baby boy or girl.

With the deadline looming to pass a spending bill to fund the government by week's end, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., meets reporters following a closed-door strategy session, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Tougher challenges than cutting taxes

Passing tax reform in record time will prove a significant accomplishment, but it pales by comparison to the challenges Republicans must tackle next.

FILE - In this March 2, 2014 file photo, movie mogul Harvey Weinstein arrives at the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. Two recent lawsuits have made the unorthodox legal argument that Harvey Weinstein's pursuit of young women, and his attempts to quiet sexual assault accusations, effectively amounted to organized crime. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

The risks of redress and reform

The attempt to redress and reform one of the great blots on American society, the use of authority in relationships to intimidate subordinates into granting sexual favors, seems to be reaching a crisis point, though the human condition probably guarantees that we will never run out of victims.

Armed police at the scene on Cromwell Gardens in London, after a car reportedly ploughed into people outside the Natural History Museum in London, Saturday Oct. 7, 2017. Police said a number of people were injured and one person was detained at the scene. (Victoria Jones/PA via AP)

Wolf whistler, be careful in Old Blighty

The bobbies will get you if'n you don't watch out. London's Metropolitan Police are considering whether to regard a wolf whistle aimed at a pretty girl (or even a plain girl with a great personality) as a "hate crime," to be treated as a serious breach of the law.