Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

The Shutdown Schumer T-shirt Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

But it’s not the ‘Trump shutdown’

- The Washington Times

Even with the shutdown averted, Democrats continue to act as if they believe that no matter what they do, Republicans will get the blame, but reality is beginning to undermine their narrative.

Barack Obama     Associated Press photo

Another day at work, another congressional tantrum

- The Washington Times

Throwing tantrums and shutting down the government is a bipartisan sport. Both Republicans and Democrats have now thrown this particular tantrum, like children fighting over a toy, and it’s great fun only for the tantrum-throwers. The rest of us, and that includes both Democrats and Republicans, are not much amused.

Illustration on the need to reform Federal welfare programs by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why welfare needs reform

With Congress back in session, what’s one of the more controversial items potentially on 2018’s legislative docket? Speaker of the House Paul Ryan says welfare reform is in the cards.

A 100 percent U.S. Angus beef Colby Jack Cheeseburger as part of U.S. President Donald Trump set is seen at Munch's Burger Shack restaurant in Tokyo Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017. The cheeseburger Trump had during his recent visit to Japan is still drawing lines at the Tokyo burger joint. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

The ‘plant-based burger’ scam

Animal activist groups are making obvious headway convincing meat eaters to put down the steak, according to a GlobalData analysis that estimates as many as 6 percent of U.S. consumers currently consider themselves vegans.

In this Feb. 1, 2017, file photo, Brooklyn College students walk between classes on campus in New York. The New York state Legislature approved a budget on April 9, 2017, that includes funding for Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo's plan to offer free tuition for middle-class students at state universities. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Taming the tuition tiger

You can’t put a price on education, the saying goes, but if you did, it would be very high. And the cost falls on everyone.

FILE - In this April 11, 2017 file photo, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, center, signs a bill between Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, left, and House Speaker Michael Busch during a bill signing ceremony following the state's legislative session at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Md.  Lawmakers are poised to act early in the upcoming legislative session on two high-profile issues: paid sick leave and medical marijuana. The General Assembly gathers Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018.   Democrats, who control the assembly, are expected to make a priority of overriding Hogan's veto of paid sick leave for businesses with 15 or more employees.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

A New Year’s present for Marylanders

Most Marylanders agree that Maryland income taxes are too high. In various rankings we almost always fall into the category of the 10 worst states. For example The Tax Foundation ranks Maryland 9th highest in individual income taxes per capita; and the 2018 business tax climate index ranks Maryland among the 10 worst of the 50 states.

For several years, the resurgent oil and gas sector was almost the sole truly bright spot of the economy. (Associated Press/File)

Free markets and free trade will fuel U.S. energy dominance

To further capitalize on America’s energy renaissance, the Trump administration should reconsider and look to strengthen free trade — particularly with Canada and Mexico, our two largest energy trading partners.

Illustration on merit-based immigration policy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s merit-based immigration system

For decades, the American people have been begging and pleading with our elected officials for an immigration system that is lawful and that serves our national interest.

Tax Cut Balloons Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Lasting and transformative tax relief

A staggering 13 billion dollars. More than the value of the entire “Star Wars” franchise. That’s the minimum amount taxpayers will save under the recently-passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act now that lawmakers have made compliance with the U.S. tax code less of a chore. Taxpayers will now also save an estimated 210 million hours of time they used to squander on the clumsy 1040 “long form.” Lighter paperwork burdens like these will begin showing up in other portions of the tax code for businesses and individuals as the new law is implemented.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Jan. 22, 2018.

The Democrats’ fiscal trap

With all the talk about a possible government shutdown due to an impasse on immigration reform, no one seems to be paying attention to a story of even bigger long-term consequence. Congress is preparing a two-year budget that blows past bipartisan spending caps to the tune of $216 billion through 2019. These are the latest stunning tallies from an analysis by Congressional Quarterly. (See chart).

Former President Richard Nixon. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

An Olympian break in the war between the words

- The Washington Times

A few Ping-Pong balls broke the Cold War ice around China a generation ago, following Richard Nixon’s stunning trip to Beijing (when it was still called Peiping), and soon the United States and China were on their way to normal diplomatic relations.

Illustration on the recent nuclear alarm in Hawaii by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Hawaii error and liberal hysteria

Murphy’s Law was written to describe how governments work. It was proved yet again on January 13 when an employee of the Hawaii Emergency Management System sent a cellphone alert that said, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” The alert was false but until it was corrected almost 40 minutes later it terrified millions of residents and tourists.

Illustration on protecting aborted babies delivered alive by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Giving the smallest patients equal protection under the law

Doctors today routinely diagnose and treat a myriad of conditions, illnesses and diseases suffered by society’s littlest patients — unborn babies and newborns — significantly enhancing both their health and longevity.

Related Articles

America's first counterinsurgency expert

Edward Lansdale is probably the greatest cold warrior that most Americans have never heard of. Max Boot has written a fascinating account of how this California college humorist, frat boy and advertising executive evolved into a counterinsurgency expert before the term was even coined. He was a virtual shadow American proconsul in both the Philippines and South Vietnam in the 1950s wisely advising both Philippine President Ramon Magsaysay and South Vietnamese leader No Dinh Diem on how to deal with Communist inspired insurgencies.

Christian sects and religious minorities face brutal persecution in areas controlled by the Islamic State. Activists say an official finding by the Obama administration that the persecution amounts to genocide should set in motion a number of legal and financial sanctions and give the issue a much greater urgency around the world. (Associated Press)

'Islamic oppression' strikes again, as 3,066 Christians killed, 1,020 raped

- The Washington Times

The Bible tells Christians to beware, that to follow Jesus paves the way for a life of challenge, mocking and persecution -- that specifically, as Matthew 10:22 states, "you will be hated by all for [His] name's sake." Well, according to a new report from Open Doors, a nonprofit that supports the spread of the faith in even the most hostile of areas, that ain't no joke.

White House: 73% of convicted terrorists since 9/11 were non-citizens

- The Washington Times

Between September 11, 2001 and December 31, 2016, 549 people were convicted of international terror offenses in United States federal court. Of those convicted terrorists, 254 were foreign-born non-citizens accounting for 73% of the convictions, according to a senior administration official who provided the data for reporters during a background briefing Tuesday.

This frame from video released by the Chelsea Manning Senate campaign on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018 shows Chelsea Manning in a campaign video. Manning on Sunday confirmed via Twitter that she is a candidate for U.S. Senate. (Chelsea Manning For US Senate via AP)

Linda Sarsour endorses Chelsea Manning for U.S. Senate

- The Washington Times

The traitor formerly known as "Bradley Manning" announced their candidacy for United States Senate in Maryland Monday and the former Army private has already lined up a key endorsement of sorts, none other than anti-Israel activist and pink-hat-wearing-angry-woman-march organizer Linda Sarsour:

In this Sept. 28, 2017, file photo, homes and other buildings destroyed by Hurricane Maria lie in ruins in Toa Alta, Puerto Rico. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

Puerto Rico newspaper columnist blames 'the Jew' for island ills

- The Washington Times

A columnist for one of Puerto Rico's largest circulation newspapers, El Nueva Dia, wrote in a recent piece that the reason the country is still struggling, post Hurricane Maria, and its citizens, living in disastrous conditions is because of Jews in America. Yes, that is what Wilda Rodriguez put forth in a piece titled, "What Does 'The Jew' Want From the Colony?"

In this Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, photo released by the Riverside County Sheriff's Department shows suspect David Allen Turpin. Authorities say an emaciated teenager led deputies to a California home where her 12 brothers and sisters were locked up in filthy conditions, with some of them malnourished and chained to beds. Riverside County sheriff's deputies arrested the parents David Allen Turpin and Louise Anna Turpin on Sunday. The parents could face charges including torture and child endangerment. (Riverside County Sheriff's Department via AP)

Evil, cloaked in Christianity

- The Washington Times

A Perris, California, couple who have been accused of shackling their 13 children to their beds and imprisoning them in filthy, dark, disgusting conditions were -- according to the grandmom -- good Christians who were simply living out their faith by having so many kids. Nope. God had nothing to do with this evil. In fact, this couple gives God a bad name.

In this Jan. 10, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump listens during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Fearful Dems preemptively strike State of Union

- The Washington Times

Democrats must be shaking in their Birkenstocks. How else to explain their many, many and many more preemptive strikes at President Donald Trump's State of the Union speech -- a speech that doesn't even take place until Jan. 30?

A model has his hair cut as he waits backstage prior to the start of Versace men's Fall-Winter 2018-19 collection, that was presented in Milan, Italy, Saturday, Jan.13, 2018. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

The cosmetology cops

Few things could be more American than volunteering to help others. So it's a shame when our altruism is thwarted by another, far more lamentable American trait: big government.

Illustration on the purpose of immigration law by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Immigration and 'rathole' countries

Many people in poor places try to migrate to richer places — and so it has always been. But some poor places become rich places and immigration flows change as a result. There are many examples of "rathole" countries changing policies and becoming rich, and relatively rich countries becoming ratholes as a result of corruption and/or socialism (e.g., Venezuela).

Sen. Charles E. Schumer. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Democrats decree death in the swamp for the Dreamers

- The Washington Times

Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi and their Democratic followers laid a careful trap for their Republican tormentors, and then fell in it. The Republican leadership can keep them from climbing out if they're smart and show a little courage.

Illustration on an alliance between Irael and Saudi Arabia by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A secret Middle East alliance

A Swiss newspaper, Basler Zeitung, reported recently that a secret alliance between Israel and Saudi Arabia aimed at restraining Iran's imperial desire for a land mass between Tehran and the Mediterranean was moving into a new phase. While there aren't formal diplomatic ties between the two countries, military cooperation does exist. In fact, the Saudi government sent a military delegation to Jerusalem several months ago to discuss Iran's role as a destabilizing force in the region.

Illustration on supporting the Iranian uprising by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to support the Iranian uprising

The current Iranian "man in the street" uprising provides the United States with a unique opportunity to achieve what should be one of our core vital national security objectives: the removal of the Iranian theocracy from power. Why? Because the Iranian theocracy has been at war with the United States for over 38 years. They have caused the death of thousands of Americans, both civilian and military.

Perpetual Motion Money Machine Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing in a scorching market

Stocks have just accomplished a Houdini — scorching to record highs while escaping volatility. The S&P 500, which accounts for 80 percent of the value of publicly traded U.S. companies, just scored an unprecedented 14 consecutive monthly gains.

Chart to accompany Emily Baker article of Jan. 16, 2018.

Small businesses and government contracts

With the sixth round of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) negotiations set to begin in Canada later this month, news reports claim that Canadian negotiators are increasingly worried that the U.S. may unilaterally quit the agreement — something that President Trump can do with the stroke of a pen.

Trump's comment not racist

A lot of people are taking President Trump's "sh—hole countries" comment out of context and cashing in on it for their own glory ("Hillary Clinton condemns Trump's 'ignorant,' 'racist' 'sh—hole' comment," Web, Jan. 12). I am an African, and I can tell you, Mr. Trump is not a racist. Those calling him one are the racists. For instance, will all those whites calling him a racist allow their children to marry black people? Or will they welcome black sons- and daughters-in-law in their houses? How many black people occupy significant positions in their employ? These are questions for thought.

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at the National Governors Association special session called "Collaborating to Create Tomorrow's Global Economy" in Providence, R.I., July 14, 2017. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press via AP) ** FILE **

A lesson from Canada

Talking the talk is easy. Walking the walk is not so easy. Justin Trudeau, the prime minister of Canada, thought he could take a shot at the Americans, and Donald Trump in particular, for its determination to get out-of-control immigration under something resembling control. Lesson apparently learned.