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President Donald Trump sits with Joshua Holt, who was recently released from a prison in Venezuela, in the Oval Office of the White House, Saturday, May 26, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump inherits Reagan’s wind

- The Washington Times

No president from either party over the past three decades has earned the inheritance of Ronald Reagan on the world stage quite like President Trump has.

Illustration on Memorial Day by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A soldier-poet’s Memorial Day

Joyce Kilmer (1886-1918) was an American soldier-poet who was killed in France during the waning months of World War I. He is remembered today primarily for his poem “Trees,” which is, unfortunately, one of the most mercilessly parodied poems in all American literature.

Illustration on the hunt for spies and witches by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hunting witches, finding spies

What did Barack Obama know and when did he know it? Those Watergate-era questions are increasingly relevant today in the rapidly expanding government-media debacle once intended solely to ensnare Donald Trump.

Illustration on the need to uphold original standards of virtue by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A return to statesmanship

America is in crisis: We hear about it daily on the news. We can see it play out in the lives of our friends, neighbors, family and colleagues. An opioid crisis. A health care crisis. An immigration crisis. These are very real challenges, but they only tell part of the story, these issues we see boiling on the surface of society.

When illegals use pilfered Social Security numbers

Last week, a House Ways and Means subcommittee heard testimony from the Social Security Administration acting commissioner about the widespread and ongoing theft of Social Security numbers (SSNs)from the American public. Despite its pervasiveness, the illegal alien side of the problem is rarely raised by the media or in Congress. Illegal immigration in general wasn’t mentioned at all during the May 17 hearing. And when the media does cover it, it’s commonly used as a rallying cry to support mass amnesty — the claim being that “illegal aliens pay into the system” and, therefore, “are as American as you and me.”

Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-NY., right, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., left, talk to one another after hosting a news conference to announce a proposed increase to teacher pay, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Democrats, desperate, face doozy of election fight

- The Washington Times

Democrats, according to recent polls, face what could kindly be called an uphill election-time battle. Kindly. More to truth, they’re facing a Chimborazo climb, so dubbed in recognition of the world’s highest peak — yes, higher even than Mount Everest.

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A petition has been launched to persuade veteran actor and political provocateur James Woods to run for California governor this year. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

James Woods faults Dems for school insecurity

- The Washington Times

James Woods, one of the few conservatives in Hollywood, sent out a scathing tweet about Democrats and their blocking of common-sense measures that could secure our nation's public schools from shooting attackers. Like how? Like pressing for gun-free zones, for example.

In this Wednesday, May 16, 2018, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump waves from the White House, in Washington. In a series of tweets Sunday, May 20, 2018, Trump skims over the facts involving the investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Donald Trump: 'Drain the Swamp!' And he is

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump is poised to officially demand a federal investigation into whether the Department of Justice "infiltrated or surveilled the Trump Campaign for Political Purposes," as he put it. And that means, once again, he is putting his mockers to shame.

What Obama and his political Choom Gang did is far worse than Watergate

- The Washington Times

At the end of all the scandal and drama, all of the breathlessly reported lies and false accusations, at the end of all the money wasted on some zany kabuki swamp dance choreographed to the thrumming of giant bullfrogs and yipping of excited coyotes — at the end of all of this — it comes down to precisely what we said it was a year and a half ago.

A shot from Tampa Bay Lightning center Cedric Paquette gets past Washington Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby for a first-period goal during Game 5 of the NHL hockey Eastern Conference finals Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Jason Behnken)

LOVERRO: Braden Holtby holds key to Capitals' fate

The Capitals can dominate, but are not dominant in the most important moments. The Capitals can play well, but they cannot sustain success. The Capitals are capable of winning, but seem far more comfortable folding. The answer? It's been the same since this round of the playoffs started -- Braden Holtby.

Illustration on Chinese pilfering of U.S. medical R&D by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Negotiating better trade agreements

President Trump is now hot and heavy in the trade negotiations with China, as well as Canada and Mexico in negotiating NAFTA 2.0. We are strong free traders, but we also believe that Mr. Trump's plans to negotiate better trade agreements that reduce trade barriers abroad are right on the mark. He also has to make sure those deals fully protect U.S. intellectual property, or what is commonly called know-how.

Illustration on Trump's Socratic method by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Donald Trump's Socratic method

While the press likes to portray President Trump as impetuous and impatient with details, when it comes to important decisions, he usually weighs options carefully.

University Goat Petting Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pursuing God, or petting goats

It is finals week at colleges and universities across the nation, and the University of Maine at Orono just announced a brilliant plan: It is providing a herd of goats for students to feed and pet in order to help them — presumably the students, not the goats — get through the stress of final exams.

Protecting the Power Grid Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A secure energy grid starts with copper

It's not hard to imagine the role that energy plays in our daily lives — in fact it becomes immediately apparent when we experience even a brief power outage in our home or workplace. Quite simply, it stops us in our tracks.

In this May 21, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, right, holds a bilateral meeting with Qatar's Emir Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al-Thani, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Trump sided with Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries Tuesday in a deepening diplomatic crisis with Qatar, appearing to endorse the accusation that the oil-rich Persian Gulf nation is funding terrorist groups. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Peace in the Middle East

Donald Trump isn't the first man to point out that life in the Middle East is built largely on a mirage of fantasy and resentment. But he is the first man in a long time to do something about it. Moving the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem is simply a long-overdue recognition of the reality that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel, and the Jews aren't going anywhere.

Trump's federal disclosure

"Trump met federal disclosure requirement by reimbursing Cohen for Stormy Daniels payment: Government" (Web, May 16) is generally factual. However, the piece implies that controversy remains about whether the disclosure under the 1978 Ethics In Government Act was timely.

Who wants that award, anyway?

Your 17 May editorial, "A bad week for Democrats," says President Trump is not likely to win the Nobel Peace Prize. That's a no-brainer, because he's even less likely to accept it. He wouldn't want his name sullied by association with the likes of Barack Obama, Jimmy Carter and Yasser Arafat. Knowing this, the Nobel Committee wouldn't embarrass themselves by doing the right thing.

Finding better angels, and becoming better

The United States has a problem. We have devolved into a mostly anti-intellectual country, instead now run by showmen and politicians and talking heads and hucksters who would rather look and talk of themselves on TV or Facebook or look into a camera than talk of freedom, liberty, wisdom, philosophy. Where the great minds went, we don't know.

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with law enforcement officials on the MS-13 street gang and border security, in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump doubles down on MS-13 as 'animals'

- The Washington Times

So President Donald Trump referred to MS-13 murderous gang members as "animals" -- and the left went nuts. Trump, to his great credit, laughed off the criticism and doubled down on his original comments.

A protester carries a sign down the street near a Planned Parenthood health center in the Van Nuys section of Los Angeles on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017. Several dozen protesters gathered in California's San Fernando Valley demanding the organization be stripped of its federal funding.  (AP Photo/Richard Vogel) ** FILE **

Trump's about to make pro-life camp very happy

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has a new proposal, and it's one that's going to make his Christian and evangelical base quite happy. He's set his sights on reeling in Planned Parenthood and abortion -- another campaign promise coming true.

Illustration on voicing the interests of American aviation workers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A voice for the American worker

Presidents are judged by how they stand up for the American people. Whether it is protecting U.S. jobs or safeguarding our industries and our jobs from foreign trade cheating, we expect our presidents to act in the best interests of Americans.

James Comey. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The collusion of lawyers is finally collapsing

- The Washington Times

Colluding, like canoodling, is all the rage. Robert Mueller, like a dog chasing his tail, has been trying for more than a year to find evidence that President Trump colluded with Vladimir Putin and the Russians to cook the 2016 election, which fate, providence, fortune and destiny decreed properly belonged to Hillary Clinton.