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Conflict Between Oil Producers in Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perils of Saudi reform

In a dizzying sequence of events, Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman took a series of moves that will strengthen his status as heir to the throne and the face of his country’s future. These included a roundup of prominent royals, businessmen, and officials and the arrest of a major international Saudi businessman. At the same time, Saudi defense systems intercepted a missile fired at Riyadh from Yemen, the Lebanese prime minister resigned his post during a visit to Saudi Arabia, and another powerful Saudi prince died in a helicopter crash.

Illustration on new GOP wisdom on taxes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Stupid Party gets smart

Republicans have long been known as “the stupid party.” They do stupid things, like waiting until mid-November to pass a must-pass tax cut that should have been done by April.

In this July 12, 2017 photo, Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn. arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington. The normally sleepy Senate Ethics Committee hasn't had a major case since 2011, but it could be deciding next year on the fate of three senators _ including two facing allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A nation of moral geldings

Question: If the woman in the photo of Al Franken (where he’s groping her while she sleeps) would have given “consent,” then would this be right and good? If morality is really nothing more than mutual “consent” and Sen. Franken could prove that she said this was okay to do while she lay sleeping, he would have nothing — absolutely nothing — to be “ashamed” of. Right?

Illustration on U.S./Azerbaijan cooperation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Azerbaijan, an American partner

Azerbaijan has long been a partner of the United States. In the 26 years since we gained our independence, Azerbaijan has sought friendly relations with the United States. Formal bilateral relations were established with the sagacious efforts and diligence of the late president of Azerbaijan Heydar Aliyev and his American counterparts: U.S. Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton.

Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Gropergate! The halls of Congress under siege!

- The Washington Times

When I was a young reporter on a certain newspaper in the South, fresh on a new job, I took a fancy to a sweet and pretty young woman (that’s how we talked in those days) working on what newspapers quaintly called “the Society pages.”

Why Trump should arm Ukraine

President Trump has often expressed his desire to build a better, more positive relationship with Russia. However, as Secretary of State Tillerson has said, improved bilateral relations will not be possible without ending Russia’s aggression against Ukraine.

Illustration on the restoration of the Alamo by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Restoring, reinforcing and remembering the Alamo

As a native Texan, as a veteran, and as Texas land commissioner, it is my solemn duty and my great honor to be the caretaker of the Alamo. Who we are as Texans started there and who we can be as Texans and Americans still lives there.

Illustration of George Papadopoulos by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Russian shadow

Thank goodness we live in a country where the people who represent us in Congress have the power to investigate and grill federal officials to root out wrongdoing in our government.

Illustration on Brett McGurk by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Following Obama’s footsteps toward Kurdistan’s destruction

Brett McGurk, an Obama appointee serving under President Trump, is working in order to ensure that the United States continues to follow Barack Obama’s failed Iraq policy even though the U.S. now has a Republican president.

United Nations U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley, right, listens as Organization of American States Secretary General Luis Almargo speaks during a U.N. meeting on human rights concerns in Venezuela, Monday Nov. 13, 2017, at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Nikki Haley quite rightly rocks U.N. boat on Venezuela

- The Washington Times

Human rights matter — that’s the message a resolute U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley just sent the Security Council’s way, reminding that Venezuela, land of the socialists, shouldn’t be allowed to skate on civil abuses. This is why Haley rocks. She’s unafraid to take the high ground on behalf of America, even when world players disapprove.

Illustration on the sexual vulgarization of the American culture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the cheap and dirty loses its punch

In the high-tech world of social media, where fake news thrives with the real, we’ve become a nation of voyeurs and eavesdroppers. Consuming the salacious is the guilty pleasure. We see and overhear a broad range of sordid comings and goings, what we used to describe quaintly as “dirty,” in the vocabularies that were once reserved for private conversations between close friends, too embarrassing for general discussion.

Illustration on CFPB by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The ‘Equifax’ threat to small-dollar loan customers

There are many flaws in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) small-dollar loan rule, which will deny millions of Americans access to a vital form of credit. One of the biggest problems, which has become an acute problem lately, is the security of consumers’ personal financial information.

When Republicans promise but don’t deliver

Voters in New Jersey and elsewhere just sent a message to President Trump and congressional Republicans: Deliver or expect to get replaced, and planned tax cuts will hardly be enough.

Illustration on a peace initiative in the form of an international research vessel for the South China Sea               The Washington Times

Using science diplomacy in the South China Sea

Despite White House efforts to deny well-established climate change reports and U.S. withdrawal from the 2015 Paris Climate Accord, most might question the wisdom of laying down a science — led peace-building plan in the contested South China Sea disputes. Yet science may prove to be the linchpin for bringing about cooperation rather than competition not only among the claimant nations in the region but also between Washington and Beijing. While President Trump’s recent offer to Vietnam’s President Tran Dai Quang to mediate the complex and challenging disputes over access to fish stocks, conservation of biodiversity and sovereignty claims caught many observers by surprise, it should not have.

Related Articles

Old-fashioned Dinner Romance Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Counterculture alternatives to soulless hook-ups

My two eldest children are in college, and listening to them talk about intimate relationships among their peers can be frightening. These days, young men and women seem to relate to each other chiefly in superficial, anatomic ways, too often fueled by heavy drinking. Disturbingly high rates of sexually transmitted diseases, rampant pornography addiction and casual sex that leaves girls feeling used and depressed are the most obvious results. But students have also lost ineffable things like the rites of romance and courtship that used to make the years of dating a sweet interlude on the way to stable marriages and happy families.

Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at the Vestavia Hills Public library, Saturday, Nov. 11, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. According to a Washington Post story Nov. 9, an Alabama woman said Moore made inappropriate advances and had sexual contact with her when she was 14. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

The unraveling culture

The times are not just "a'changing," as Bob Dylan sang of them — but they're unraveling. Dismembering of the culture is at hand, and only the blind and foolish cannot see it. History is trashed and anyone who objects is a bigot, or worse. Pale-skinned Americans are vilified for living innocent lives, exploiting "white privilege." Bulls-eyes are painted on the backs of conservatives and Republicans because, well, they're conservatives and Republicans. Every man is a sexual predator, or will be soon. Throwing brickbats at unpopular targets can be great fun, but what goes around comes around.

Activists with Planned Parenthood demonstrated in Washington on Oct. 20, 2017, in support of a pregnant 17-year-old being held in a Texas facility for unaccompanied immigrant children to obtain an abortion. (Associated Press) **FILE**

The inconvenience of a conscience

Abortion is the issue that will divide America forever because it's fundamentally an issue of conscience vs. convenience, with no victory for either side in prospect. A conscience is difficult to silence and everybody likes convenience. There's no better snapshot of the chasm between red America and blue America.

Bush wrong to jump on Trump

That former President George W. Bush would speak out against a sitting president now, and never did so during the Obama era, is indicative of why Donald Trump was elected president in the first place. Today's Republican-establishment politicians are the latest exemplar of why Washington is so often called a swamp, with self-aggrandizement and self-enrichment making "the people" sound like some sweet, old-fashioned notion.

NFL, look to Canada, U.K.

Maybe the NFL ought to take a page out of the books of other professional sports, those that manage their pre-game national anthems with grace. The England and German national soccer teams not only sing their respective anthems but recently also wear arm bands with poppies on them. The English teams all wear poppies on their uniforms for the week prior to their national veterans/remembrance day. Hockey Night in Canada had a solemn tribute to all veterans prior to last Saturday's game, and it included a pipe band and a vignette about soldiers from prior conflicts. Even the flamboyant Don Cherry wore a subdued blue blazer with a Royal Canadian Legion emblem, as well as a poppy — as all Canadian coaches wear for this hallowed period.

A statesman in life, forgotten in death

History is unkind to compromisers. If they succeed, disaster is averted and the compromiser is soon forgotten. If they fail, they're often scapegoated for subsequent events. Neville Chamberlain, the British prime minister whose negotiations averted war with Hitler over Czechoslovakia comes to mind. Chamberlain thought his concessions had brought "peace in our time."

Matt Drudge (Associated Press/Brian K. Diggs) ** FILE **

Drudge lets loose on The Washington Post

- The Washington Times

Matt Drudge of Drudge Report fame unleashed on The Washington Post on Twitter, calling out the media outlet for a headline and story that seemed to suggest the popular site was pro-Russia. This is a well-deserved smack-down of The Post.

In this Oct. 18, 2017, file photo, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell speaks during a news conference, in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

Roger Goodell's 'unseemly,' 'offensive' salary quest

- The Washington Times

Roger Goodell, the much-beleaguered NFL commissioner -- the one who will probably go down as Most Tone Deaf football league chief in history, at least when it comes to respecting fans' wishes -- has reportedly asked for a $49.5 million annual salary for life in his recent contract negotiations. Oh, and a private jet, too. Oh, and lifetime health benefits for his family.

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore of Alabama says it is Majority Leader Mitch McConnell who should step aside. (Associated Press)

Roy Moore to sue The Washington Post

- The Washington Times

Roy Moore, the Republican's nominee in the Alabama fight for the U.S. Senate seat, announced he's going to sue The Washington Post for the series of stories that implicate him in sexual dalliances with underage girls 40 years ago. He said this as political players in his own party were folding like cheap card tables to get him to quit.

This combination photo shows, top row from left, film producer Harvey Weinstein, former Amazon Studios executive Roy Price, director James Toback, New Orleans chef John Besh, middle row from left, fashion photographer Terry Richardson, New Republic contributing editor Leon Wiseltier, former NBC News political commentator Mark Halperin, former Defy Media executive Andy Signore, and bottom row from left, filmmaker Brett Ratner, actor Kevin Spacey, actor Jeremy Piven and actor Dustin Hoffman. In the weeks since the string of allegations against Weinstein first began, an ongoing domino effect has tumbled through not just Hollywood but at least a dozen other industries. (AP Photos/File)

'Sex Scandal' (Part One)

America is in the midst of a huge, sordid sex scandal. As horrific as it is to have so much alleged sexual harassment and abuse coming to light, worse still is the reality that we should not be surprised.

Tremors in the Saudi Arabian Kingdom Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The destabilization of Saudi Arabia

A wide variety of threats, ranging from intensifying proxy wars and hostile neighbors to the purge of prominent individuals, seems to be destabilizing the House of Saud.

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, right, leaves the Fort Bragg courtroom facility as the judge deliberates in a sentencing hearing at Fort Bragg, N.C., Friday, Nov. 3, 2017. Bergdahl, who walked off his base in Afghanistan in 2009 and was held by the Taliban for five years, pleaded guilty to desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

The Bergdahl liberals

I thought later about the women's admiration of Mr. Obama while reading about Army deserter Bowe Bergdahl's light, dishonorable discharge without incarceration for leaving his post in 2009 and causing severe injuries and possibly related deaths of several fellow soldiers in Afghanistan. Sgt. Bergdahl's return was procured by Mr. Obama in 2014 in exchange for five Taliban commanders who have gone back to plotting the destruction of the United States and our allies.

Illustration on child tax credits by Linas Garsys/ The Washington Times

Investing in long-term prosperity

Though we don't agree on the overall tax package being debated in Washington, we do agree that Congress should act to increase the value of and access to the child tax credit and the child and dependent care tax credit for families with children ages 0-5 as key steps in helping low- and middle-income working families and investing in our country's long-term prosperity.

Illustration on William Carey    The Washington Times

When Reformers traveled to India, China and Korea

In the U.S. and Europe, churches dedicated entire services and sermon series to the subject, tracing their theological history back to Oct. 31, 1517, Reformation Day. In Germany, where the date was declared a national holiday, more than 2 million people from across the world pilgrimaged to Wittenberg, the birthplace of the Reformation, to breathe the air of the historic occasion.