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Illustration on the aggressive strategic future of Syria by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The new ‘great game’ in Syria

In the second half of the 19th century, the British and Russian empires competed for domination of Central Asia in what history labels “The Great Game.” A new “great game,” with the entire Middle East at stake, is now being played out in Syria. The opponents are Russia and Iran on one side and the U.S. and Israel on the other. Both sides will try to use Arab states and Turkey as pawns.

Logical Progression of a Gun Ban Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More laws do not a moral people make

This past Valentine’s Day, Nikolas Cruz entered a classroom in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and proceeded to murder 17 people and wound 15 others. Before any meaningful criminal investigation could even begin, our nation’s cultural elites rushed to their respective podiums, finding fault and casting aspersions. Scoring political points is the name of the game. Removing personal rights embedded in our Constitution and replacing them with more laws and less freedom seems to be the only way they know to keep score.

Chart to acccompany Moore article of Feb. 19, 2018.

Obama’s real debt and deficit legacy

Congressional Republicans have been raked over the coals in the last two weeks for slamming through budget caps and inflating government spending and debt by another $300 billion. The criticisms are well deserved.

Unrest in India Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

India’s democracy and Modi’s reforms

If there’s one thing we’ve learned about Prime Minister Narendra Modi is that he’s not afraid of using radical maneuvers to accomplish his economic agenda for India.

Kim Yo-jong, sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, arrives at the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018. (Associated Press)

The snookered press at Pyeongchang

- The Washington Times

When Kim Jong-un dispatched his crack propaganda team to Pyeongchang (and not P.F. Chang, the Chinese restaurant chain, as reported by NBC News) to cover the Winter Olympics, he couldn’t have imagined that the American media in town would have been so easy to con.

Illustration on history repeating itself in U.S. involvement in Afghanistan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How Afghanistan can take the road not taken in Vietnam

We haven’t heard much about Afghanistan in the news lately. Occasionally, an American will be killed, or there will be a bombing, but the current U.S. strategy of the “Afghanization” seems to have produced a stalemate that is not necessarily a bad thing.

Patent Law Working Properly Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Patent reform and innovation

On February 5, the Senate confirmed Andre Iancu as director of the Patent and Trademark Office.

Illustration on Mongolia's desire to separate from China by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Divided, Mongolia cannot stand

A celebrity and business tycoon being elected president. A man whose campaign touted nationalism, with a slogan of putting the nation “first.”

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with North Korean defectors where he talked with reporters about allowing the release of a secret memo on the FBI's role in the Russia inquiry, in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) ** FILE **

The perilous Trump budget

After promising voters in 2016 that he would balance the budget, President Trump has proposed a $4.4 trillion spending plan for fiscal year 2019 that is dangerously unbalanced.

Illustration on the national debt by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Don’t worry about the national debt

“If something cannot go on forever, it will stop,” said Herbert Stein, President Nixon’s chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors. America’s national debt has grown from 32 percent of GDP in 1981 to 68 percent in 2008 and 108 percent in 2017. The national debt is high, and some components are growing on autopilot. Still, Washington keeps adding to it.

This Feb. 19, 2013, file photo shows OxyContin pills arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. The maker of the powerful painkiller said it will stop marketing opioid drugs to doctors, a surprise reversal after lawsuits blaming the company for helping trigger the current drug abuse epidemic. OxyContin has long been the worlds top-selling opioid painkiller and generated billions in sales for privately held Purdue. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)

Opioid regulation not the way to fight ODs, cure addiction

- The Washington Times

The country’s gone head-over-heels nuts on opioids, the drug of effectiveness for long-time pain sufferers. As if cracking down on producers, distributors, insurers and sellers will cure the underlying roots of addiction — the psychological and emotional factors that lead to a practice of self-destruction.

Illustration on the downsides of bipartisanship by Linas Garsys/the Washington Times

The downside of bipartisanship

The House and Senate’s passage of “a two-year budget deal,” (plus an appropriation to avoid a “government shutdown” for a month, during which the details of that deal may be negotiated) is news because the “deal” spends 13.5 percent more for the coming two fiscal years than the Obama administration had proposed for them, and expands the government at an unprecedented rate. By comparison, President Obama was a conservative. Who’d a thunk it?

FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2018, file photo, Chinese and American flags fly outside of a JW Marriott hotel in Beijing. Politics weighs more heavily on foreign companies in China than it has in nearly three decades, as companies face pressure on many sides from Chinese President Xi Jinping's more nationalistic stance and twin campaigns to tighten the ruling Communist Party's political control and have it play a more direct role in business. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)

How to counter a deliberate Chinese confrontation

Aside from failing to provide any meaningful support to curb North Korea’s destabilizing nuclear weapons programs, China continues with its bullying and aggressive tactics to advance its totalitarian control of both the South and East China Seas. China’s claims to nearly all of the South China Sea clash with those of Taiwan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia and Brunei — but only China is trying to impose control on the whole region.

Related Articles

The official portraits of former President Barack Obama and former first lady Michelle Obama are displayed together following an official unveiling ceremony at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, Monday, Feb. 12, 2018, in Washington. Barack Obama's portrait was painted by artist Kehinde Wiley, and Michelle Obama's portrait was painted by artist Amy Sherald. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Painting a prickly president

Nobody likes to get his picture took. Vanity, thy name is woman. (Shakespeare's observation was actually written as "frailty," but good luck with correcting it now.) Vanity is a curse not restricted to the ladies. You need look no further than the White House for proof of that.

End Congress-pharma collusion

It is becoming more and more difficult to read media coverage of the skyrocketing cost of prescription medications. Just a little digging and research reveals the reason for this price surge: Congress has a law on the books that "prohibits" the government and Medicare from negotiating prices with major drug companies.

Stop Iran now

Last weekend, with the infiltration of a drone into Israeli airspace, we saw a blatant and provocative move from the Iranian regime. In response, Israel launched military strikes in Syria. For years now Iran has been expanding its tentacles in the Middle East, and it is only growing stronger.

Defending what is best in America

Roger Kimball, editor and publisher of The New Criterion, a monthly magazine named for The Criterion, a British literary magazine edited by T.S Eliot in the 1930s, is also the publisher of Encounter Books, which took its name from the literary magazine founded by Irving Kristol and Stephen Spender.

Illustration by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

Zoning out on free speech

"The Death of Free-Speech Zones," reads a recent headline in Inside Higher Education. It's a demise that anyone who believes in the First Amendment can cheer.

Former President Barack Obama, left, speaks at the unveiling ceremony for the Obama's official portraits at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, Monday, Feb. 12, 2018, in Washington. Obama's portrait was painted by Artist Kehinde Wiley, and Michelle Obama's portrait was painted by Artist Amy Sherald. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Barack Obama's portrait -- a real 'what is that!' moment

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama's official portrait unveiling just went forth at the National Portrait Gallery -- and boy, was it a WTFreak moment. Was that a giant fern in front of which Obama was seated? It reminded of his interview with Zach Galifianakis of "Funny or Die" fame and the "Between Two Ferns" chat.

From left, North Korea's nominal head of state Kim Yong Nam, South Koran President Moon Jae-in, his wife Kim Jung-sook, and Kim Yo Jong, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's sister, wave after a performance of North Korea's Samjiyon Orchestra at National Theater in Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, Feb. 11, 2018. A rare invitation to Pyongyang for South Korea's president marked Day Two of the North Korean Kim dynasty's southern road tour, part of an accelerating diplomatic thaw that included some Korean liquor over lunch and the shared joy of watching a "unified" Korea team play hockey at the Olympics. (Bee Jae-man/Yonhap via AP)

Media go ga-ga on North Korea in gag-me Olympic lovefest

- The Washington Times

It's not entirely unusual for the mainstream media to be slammed as little more than a mouthpiece for the left. But loving on the dictatorships? That's exactly what some seem to be doing, with all the heaping of praise that's been piled on Kim Jong-un's sister, who's attending the Olympics -- or, as The New York Times would put it, in this glaring headline: "Kim Jong-Un's Sister Turns On the Charm, Taking [Mike] Pence's Spotlight."

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg reacts to the welcome she receives before participating in a "fireside chat" in the Bruce M. Selya Appellate Courtroom at the Roger William University Law School on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, in Bristol, R.I. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)

Ginsburg: Election 2016 too 'macho' for Hillary to win

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton has spent most of her days, post-election, pining about her loss and blaming it on the deplorables who followed President Donald Trump -- the co-called sexist, misogynist atmosphere she perceives as marking her race to the White House. Well now, here comes Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, tossing the same gender card. And not for the first time, either.

Stockton California in a Glass Box Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Free money and pigeons

According to The Washington Post, which should know, Democrats are moving even farther left in an effort to appeal to more Americans.

Illustration on America's mineral abundance by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Making America a strategic mineral superpower

- The Washington Times

Why is the United States reliant on China and Russia for strategic minerals when we arguably have more of these valuable resources than both these nations combined? This has nothing to do with geological impediments. It is all politics.

Illustration on the danger of trade retaliation by China by Linas Garsys/the Washington Times

How Trump's trade policy courts disaster

Of all the economic policies President Trump has marked for attention this year — merit-based immigration, infrastructure and vocational training — fixing the trade deficit offers the biggest bang for the buck.

Due Credit for the Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The 2017-2018 economic recovery

Whatever happened to the New Normal? First, Obama Democrats told us that what looked like long-term stagnation under President Obama's economic policies, with growth stuck at 2 percent on average for his whole eight years in office, was the New Normal that the American people were going to have to get used to, the best we could do now.

File - In this Friday, Oct. 19, 2012 file photo, students study in a library on the campus of California State University, Long Beach in Long Beach, Calif. California State University is considering raising tuition in 2018-19 for the second straight year, a move trustees say would be a last resort if the state does not chip in more funding for the country's largest university system. The Board of Trustees said Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, that Gov. Jerry Brown's proposed state budget, released earlier this month, allocates a fraction of what the system's 23 campuses need to maintain their quality of education at a time of record-high enrollment. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

First and second things, character and color

C.S. Lewis told us in "God in the Dock": "Put first things first and second things are thrown in. Put second things first and you lose both first and second things." In his publication titled First Things, Richard John Neuhaus warned, "One must never underestimate the profound bigotry and anti-intellectualism [of second things]."

An athlete from team USA points during the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018. (Clive Mason/Pool Photo via AP)

Dark skin and gold medals

If race-consciousness becomes an Olympic sport, and who can say it won't, the United States will have a lock on the gold medal. Silver and bronze, too. There's no escaping race obsession that thrives in every crevice, cleft, nook and cranny in America. A body can step on it unaware everywhere.