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Mike Pompeo. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democratic terror of a miracle in North Korea

- The Washington Times

Trying to spark a new romance, or even arrange a weekend tryst, is not always easy. It’s impossible with the help of spectators eager to throw things, not orange blossoms but sticks and stones with sharp edges. But that’s how Washington tries to conduct diplomacy, circa 2018.

Illustration on Taiwan's contributions to world health by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Taiwan must be seated at the World Health Assembly

The constitution of the World Health Organization (WHO) notes that “the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition.” Yet WHO withheld, as last year, an invitation for Taiwan’s participation in May as an observer in the annual World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva, Switzerland.

House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway, R-Texas, joined at left by Vice Chairman Glenn Thompson, R-Pa., announces the new farm bill, officially known as the 2018 Agriculture and Nutrition Act, at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 12, 2018. The bulk of the bill's spending goes toward funding SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Faith leaders skew Bible to oppose SNAP reform

- The Washington Times

Faith leaders are coming out in full force to oppose the Republican-sponsored Farm Bill released in the House that imposes stricter work requirements on those receiving food stamps. Do not be fooled by their so-called Christian arguments in opposition of this bill. Their arguments are neither Christian nor common sense.

The Birth of a New Economic Recovery Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The optimists may be right

In January, Wall Street investors were optimistic tax cuts would sustain economic growth and the Trump bull market. As spring arrives, the world has proven decidedly more uncertain.

Illustration on the costs of Elon Musk's Space X by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The crony capitalist in free market clothing

You might imagine that pro-capitalism, free-market folk like me would just love what Elon Musk has done in the past couple of decades but you’d be wrong. I enjoy his entrepreneurial spirit and success, founding company (zip2) after company (PayPal) after company (The Boring Co.) and turning them into properties worth billions and then moving along to the next new thing. Props and kudos to this son of South Africa and prototype for “Iron Man.” You got those parts right.

William Wachtel holds up a mock Social Security card of President-elect Donald Trump as he speaks to members of the media following a meeting with Trump at Trump Tower in New York, Monday, Jan. 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A fresh start for a beleaguered agency

It seemed like it would never happen. But after more than five years, a formal nomination of a Social Security commissioner will finally be considered by the U.S. Senate. This is a long overdue development. The delay of a nomination, however, pales compared to the wait a million Americans continue to endure for a hearing that will decide if they will receive the Social Security disability benefits they earned while working.

President Donald Trump gestures during a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump's private Mar-a-Lago club, Wednesday, April 18, 2018, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump and the attorney-client privilege

A few weeks ago, President Trump was an outwardly happy man because of the utterance of one solitary word from the lips of special counsel Robert Mueller to one of Mr. Trump’s lawyers. The word that thrilled the president and his legal team was “subject.”

The Tarmac Meeting Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Clintons and the rule of law

Former Obama Attorney General Loretta Lynch, in a NBC interview last Monday, reopened a can of worms. In the interview, Ms. Lynch defended her private meeting with Bill Clinton back on June 27, 2016.

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Illustration on ACLU perception of constitutional rights by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Just a shadow of the old ACLU

Remember when the American Civil Liberties Union was a staunch defender of First Amendment rights? The ACLU even defended the right of American Nazis to march in Skokie, Ill., the home of thousands of Holocaust survivors. Well, nowadays the ACLU is but a shadow of its former self, as it increasingly succumbs to the left's latest siren songs.

Illustration on the hazards of being a Chinese-language reporter with VOA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The most hazardous job in the federal government

Earlier this year, dozens of relatives of five reporters of the Uyghur Service, Radio Free Asia (RFA), were detained by the Chinese government in China's Xinjiang region. The medieval type of practice was clearly a powerful means of retaliation against the reporters. Such long-standing practice promised severe punishment to those who dared to challenge the regime by holding their loved ones hostage.

Chart to accompany Moore article of April 16, 2018.

The trillion dollar myth

There is an old saying that you can't teach an old dog new tricks, and we've learned that again with the Congressional Budget Office and its latest highly misleading fiscal forecast.

Demonstrators rally in support of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) outside the Capitol, Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018, in Washington, on the second day of the federal shutdown. Democrats have been seeking a deal to protect the "Dreamers," who have been shielded against deportation by DACA, which President Donald Trump halted last year. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) **FILE**

No discounts for Dreamers

Life is not fair, as John F. Kennedy famously said, and sometimes it's not fair for everybody. The Arizona Supreme Court last week ruled that the "Dreamers," children brought to the United States by their illegal-immigrant parents, are not eligible for in-state tuition rates at Arizona's three state universities and at its network of community colleges.

Vote this November

Our nation has reached a critical stage in its ongoing evolution. We are dangerously close to becoming a socialist country (think Venezuela). We elected President Trump because he promised to get us back on the path our Founders intended. He has been working to do that but it's been slow and difficult because much of Congress and the federal courts have fought him every step of the way.

FILE - In this Aug. 10, 2012 file photo a customer pumps gas into his dual-tank pickup truck at a 76 gas station in Los Angeles. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt indicated this week he may target a longstanding federal waiver that allows California to set its own, tougher tailpipe emission standards, an exception that's allowed the state to prod the rest of nation to do more against air pollution and climate change for a half-century. (AP Photo/Grant Hindsley, File)

Misjudging data and its deadly consequences

Following an International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) review of benzene, a chemical commonly found in gasoline, tobacco smoke and other industries, a chemical engineer is alleging serious errors, which could have potentially deadly consequences for workers exposed to the substance.

In this May 3, 2017, file photo, then-FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) ** FILE **

Why would Trump ask the FBI to investigate 'Pee Tape' if it was real?

- The Washington Times

Lost in the breathless reporting over the former FBI Director's assertion that Trump asked him to investigate the most salacious items in the political propaganda known as the Russian dossier is a basic logical question: Why would Trump unleash the full investigative power of the Federal Bureau of Investigation on the golden shower story if there was even the slightest chance it was true?

In this June 8, 2017, file photo, Former FBI Director James Comey reacts during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) ** FILE **

James Comey tell-all strikes as revengeful rip of Donald Trump

- The Washington Times

It's not that the nation doesn't already know of James Comey's utter contempt for President Donald Trump. But there's something about putting hatred to print that makes it all the more vicious. And that's what Comey seems to have done with his new tell-all book, poised to hit bookstores across the country. It's his way of getting the last word with the president -- his way of exacting a revenge for being fired.

Columbus Blue Jackets left wing Artemi Panarin (9) celebrates his game-winning goal in overtime with Nick Foligno (71), Brandon Dubinsky (17), Ian Cole (23) and David Savard (58) in Game 1 of an NHL first-round hockey playoff series against the Washington Capitals, Thursday, April 12, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)

LOVERRO: Worst Game 1 loss since the last worst Game 1 loss

It's clear the Washington Capitals don't appreciate the postseason hump they carried into the opening round of the Stanley Cup playoffs Thursday night at the arena, because they only made it bigger by blowing a gift of a 2-0 lead, losing game one in overtime 4-3 to the first wild-card team in the Metro Division, the Columbus Blue Jackets.

Illustration on Paul Ryan's fiscal legacy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Paul Ryan's budget legacy

Paul Ryan's decision to retire from Congress is a tough hit for House Republicans. His calm, steadfast leadership has been a steadying hand over a couple of tumultuous years. Perhaps his biggest selling point to his colleagues to take the difficult votes was that he, himself, made the difficult decision to move into the big office. Like Cincinnatus, he didn't want the job. And that's one of the things people liked most about his ascension to the office of Speaker.

Illustration on government budget cuts by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why rescission is a must

Conservatives are horrified by the staggering $21 trillion in debt as well as the trillion dollar deficits we are running each year as a result of the latest omnibus bill and spending trajectory. Last month, my office's phones were ringing off the hook with constituents dismayed that Washington is once again dramatically growing the size of government and their kids' debt bill.

Illustration on a U.S. China trade deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Cutting a deal with China

The Trump strategy to radically change trade and investment relations with China is well-intentioned but poorly conceived.

Hoeschler Tower at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. (Wikipedia)

Remembering Pat Korten

- The Washington Times

Pat Korten, who died after a stroke last week, was one of the unsung heroes of the early conservative movement. We were students together at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, which in the mid-Sixties was morphing into an ideological battleground much like Berkeley in the West and Columbia in New York. The campus left, often encouraged by the university's left-wing faculty, was on the march and growing increasingly intolerant.

Illustration on the southern border wall by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Donald Trump's wall

In his blockbuster 2016 campaign for president, Donald Trump made a lot of big proposals to fix our country's problems that he said could be accomplished relatively quickly.

Sarah Bernhardt. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Paul Ryan and the long goodbye

- The Washington Times

The speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives has a difficult job. He has to spend a lot of time with congressmen, after all, and the typical congressman, Republican or Democrat, is composed of two pounds of ambition, three pounds of compressed gas and eight ounces of brains, stuffed into a one-pound bag. Who can deny him a hermitage in the Wisconsin wilds.