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Joe Louis. (National Portrait Gallery)

The septuagenarian smackdown

- The Washington Times

This won’t be “the thrilla in Manila,” or the “rumble in the jungle,” but “two clowns in a septuagenarian smackdown” should do more for the sweet science of boxing than anything since the two Joe Louis-Max Schmeling fights on the eve of World War II.

Illustration on advice for reforming the State Department by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Some advice for Mike Pompeo

Rex Tillerson was doomed from the start as secretary of State in attempting to transform the organization by making it leaner and more agile. Few would doubt that State badly needed some transformation to continue into the 21st century, but Mr. Tillerson chose the wrong model for reform and transformation. Mr. Tillerson’s designated successor, Mike Pompeo, would do well to consider some successful government transformational models that have worked.

The U.S.-Ukrainian strategic partnership

With Vladimir Putin’s recent declaration that Russia has developed very sophisticated hypersonic intercontinental missiles, he has not abandoned aggressive action at the lower spectrum of warfare. Russia’s apparent nerve agent attack in the U.K. is the latest and most brazen in a long list of hybrid warfare against Western democracies.

Illustration on the strategic importance of supporting the Kurds by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why America must help the Kurds in Syria

In recent days, the situation has deteriorated dramatically for the Kurds in Syria. According to Kurdish sources, more than 200,000 Kurds have been displaced within the past week and several hundred Kurds have been killed as Turkey and its Syrian allies take over Afrin.

More than a wake-up call for the GOP

The Pennsylvania 18th Congressional District was more than a wakeup call for House Republicans. Unless the GOP changes its posture on achieving fairness as well as growth in the economy and its relationship with President Trump, it’s doomed to a terrible shellacking in November — the kind Democrats endured in the midterm elections of 1994 and 2010.

In this Dec. 15, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State and presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to the GirlsBuildLA Leadership Summit in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

A bitter Hillary Clinton strikes again

Hillary Clinton has not had a good week. In the aftermath of her trip to India and awful comments about Americans and women in particular, most of her allies and Democrats in general were explicit that it was time for her to leave the political arena. The shorter message from Democrats to Mrs. Clinton was “shut up and go away.”

Illustration on the upcoming meeting between President Trump and Kim Jong-un by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A just resolution of the North Korean conflict

President Donald Trump’s bold decision to accept the invitation of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un for a meeting was unprecedented. Although this will be the first meeting of a sitting president with a North Korean leader, it follows a series of temporary successes the U.S. has had with North Korea during the past 25 years.

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Illustration on the legal and commercial rights of generic drug manufacturers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Big Pharma and its battle lines

- The Washington Times

It may be hard to believe, but some conservatives are arguing that any conservative who supports a measure before Congress called the CREATES Act that would allow generic drug makers under certain circumstances to go to court to get their competitors to play by the rules are ideological sellouts too willing to jump into bed with liberals and greedy trial lawyers.

Illustration on Betsy DeVos by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In defense of Betsy DeVos

Other than maybe the highly voluble William Bennett, Ronald Reagan's second education chief (who still has a radio show), it is difficult to think of a U.S. Secretary of Education who has garnered as much attention as Betsy DeVos. But not in a good way. As exemplified by her much-lambasted interview on "60 Minutes" recently, from basically the day her nomination was announced she has been condemned as dangerous and unprepared for the job.

Illustration on GOP obstruction of protection for religious liberty in Oklahoma by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Honest and dishonest devils

On March 15, Oklahoma's Senate was scheduled to vote on SB 197, the Protection of Freedom of Conscience Act. This act sought to codify into law the rights and protections of all Oklahomans to express and practice their religion freely in the public square without fear of government penalty or government coercion. The Oklahoma Senate is composed of 48 members, 40 of which are currently Republican.

FILE- In this April 1, 2017, file photo, a service dog named Orlando rests on the foot of its trainer, John Reddan, of Warwick, N.Y., while sitting inside a United Airlines plane at Newark Liberty International Airport during a training exercise in Newark, N.J. Trainers took dogs through security check and onto a plane as part of the exercise put on by the Seeing Eye puppy program. If your pet must travel, experts say that the cabin is safer than the cargo hold. Pets too large to fit in an under-seat carrier must go cargo unless it's a service or emotional-support animal. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

Peril in the friendly skies

Nearly everyone has an airline horror story: Delayed flights, missed connections, inedible meals, lost luggage. But flying has never been safer or more affordable, unless you're a dog. Nevertheless grumpy and grousing flyers should count their blessings.

Clintons here to stay

"Billary Clinton" will never stop running their shadow presidency against Donald Trump or their own party. As former co-presidents from January 1993 to January 2001 and puppet masters of every Obama-Biden appointment Hillary and Bill Clinton know full well how to assume total legal, political and fiscal control of anything and everyone in Washington and beyond.

Columnist not objective source

I haven't done enough research or analysis to determine whether Washington Times contributor Donald Lambro is a card-carrying "Never-Trump"-er, but my perception over time has been that when Mr. Lambro's name is on top of a column, there's bound to be some Trump-bashing below. All well and good, as the president is far from flawless and everyone can use some criticism from time to time. And Mr. Lambro certainly has proven that he can be counted on to provide this service for The Times.

A brave woman who defied Mao Zedong

As "free speech" and Vietnam War protests roiled the nation decades ago, a noisy fringe among the marchers proudly flaunted the green cotton jacket preferred by Mao Zedong, longtime dictator of the People's Republic of China.

MSNBC's Joe Scarborough. ** FILE **

Joe Scarborough crows Trump 'doomed to fail'

- The Washington Times

MSNBC's Joe Scarborough unleashed a scathing commentary against President Donald Trump in a Washington Post opinion piece, calling out the Republican as pretty much a political aberration, "doomed to fail." Hmm. Can you say President Hillary Clinton? No, we can't, either.

Illustration on the hyperloop by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A fast and feasible infrastructure option

Hyperloop is a new transportation technology that proposes sending cargo and passengers through evacuated tubes at speeds exceeding 700 mph. Unsurprisingly, this idea has provoked its share of skepticism. Hyperloop won't be perfect on Day One, but neither were airlines. They took time to evolve.

Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

One last dance with Hillary

- The Washington Times

There's scarcely a pundit, wise guy or blowhard at the end of the bar who hasn't sworn off Hillary Clinton, vowing that it's time to find something new to rant and rave about.

Illustration on Hezbollah in Lebanon by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The problem is Hezbollah

Current U.S. policy toward Lebanon confirms Voltaire's observation that "the human brain is a complex organ with the wonderful power of enabling man to find reasons for continuing to believe whatever it is that he wants to believe."

In this photo released by Brazil's presidential press office, Brazil's President Michel Temer, left, speaks during the opening plenary session of the World Economic Forum for Latin America, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Wednesday, March 14, 2018. Temer says Brazil will bring the question of U.S. tariffs on steel to the World Trade Organization if it doesn't achieve a "friendly" solution through negotiations.(Beto Barata/Brazil's presidential press office via AP)

Trump's tariffs aren't killing the World Trade Organization

Historians may mark President Trump's tariffs on solar panels, aluminum and steel as the death knell for the World Trade Organization (WTO) but the institution was faltering long before President Trump came along.

Illustration on Rex Tillerson by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Tillerson exit, the Russian gambit

Fourteen months after he had become secretary of State, Rex Tillerson learned Tuesday that President Trump had fired him by sending out a public tweet.

Use tech for border wall

The president is on the right track pushing ahead with plans to build a wall to defend our border from illegal interlopers. However, he is way behind the times with his desire to physically "see through" the wall.

These weapons not 'assault rifles'

I expect better of The Washington Times than to blindly repeat the liberal myth that stores are selling "assault weapons" ("Outdoors stores quietly continue to sell assault weapons," Web, March 13). Military select-fire assault weapons such as the M16, and M4 are by definition capable of firing "fully automatic" (i.e., emptying the entire clip with one press of the trigger). Virtually no gun stores sell these; the few "Class III" dealers who are allowed to do so require a special federal license and a personal recommendation from the local chief of police.

President Donald Trump reviews border wall prototypes, Tuesday, March 13, 2018, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Something there is that likes a wall

"What you have to understand about Donald Trump, a perceptive observer of the American scene once told a visitor from abroad, "is that the press here takes him literally, but not seriously, and his millions of supporters take him seriously, but not literally."