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A page from a Gutenberg Bible. (The Washington Times) ** FILE **

The wounded printed page strikes back

- The Washington Times

Fake news is everywhere, cluttering desktops, iPads, laptops, iPhones and all the other manifestations of the post-literate era when it’s just too much trouble to find a reliable read.

Ambassador Faith Whittlesey poses Nov. 16, 1985 in Geneva, Switzerland. Representative diplomatic official spokeswoman. (AP photo/Michele Euler)

Remembering Faith Ryan Whittlesey

Early in 1983, an attractive young woman I did not know grabbed my sleeve as I was leaving a meeting on Central America in the White House Cabinet Room. She stuck her card in my hand. It read, “Ambassador Faith Ryan Whittlesey, Assistant to the President for Public Liaison.” On the back she had penned, “Call me! You need my help.”

Illustration on examining the FISA court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Questioning accountability on the secret court

Story after story comes out about the extent to which partisan politics played a key role in the Obama Department of Justice (DOJ), intelligence community and FBI during the 2016 presidential campaign. It’s especially so in the context of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, and the more recent suggestions of a “mole” or “spy” inside the Trump campaign.

Illustration on the effects of recent tax cuts by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why liberals hate the Trump tax cut

Despite liberal hysterics, Republicans’ recent tax cut raised top earners’ share of America’s tax burden. This seemingly “squared circle” is simply due to a fact true before the legislation and even truer after: Middle- and upper-income earners shoulder the overwhelming tax load. Equally obvious: Even so large a share is not enough for an insatiable left.

Illustration on Russia's history of state breaking by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s love affair with state-breaking

In Russia’s long-term war against the West that includes the infiltration of domestic political systems, blackmail and the indirect influence of elected officials through “ethnic political organizations,” one of its most prized and enduring tactics is its exploitation of ethnoreligious rivalries and fissures within the states along its borders.

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Robert Mueller's lost cause

- The Washington Times

Happy anniversary, Robert Mueller -- it's the one-year mark of the special counsel's investigation into the President Donald Trump-Russia collusion-slash-obstruction-of-justice-slash-whatever-else-comes-up look-see. And much as the mainstream media, left and anti-Trumpers of the world want to spin it, it's been a political failure of epic proportions for the left.

In this Monday, May 14, 2018 photo, people make bets in the sports book at the South Point hotel and casino in Las Vegas. Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has cleared the way for states to legalize sports betting, the race is on to see who will referee the multi-billion-dollar business expected to emerge from the decision.  (AP Photo/John Locher) **FILE**

'Bill Bradley, call your bookie'

In 1992, Congress passed a statute authored by Sen. Bill Bradley of New Jersey, who was a former Princeton University and New York Knicks basketball superstar, prohibiting the states from authorizing sports betting. At that time, gambling in Atlantic City was flourishing, and notwithstanding one of its own senators' efforts to keep gambling away from competitive sports, the state of New Jersey wanted to duplicate Las Vegas' success with sports betting.

Illustration on rude political discourse by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The coarsening of political language

Here in Australia, "Question Time" has long been one of my favorite exercises of parliamentary democracy. The prime minister and government ministers appear before other elected members in support of their policies, while the opposition asks pointed and sometimes funny questions in an effort to belittle those policies.

MidEast Pillars Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump's productive disruption

In the same way that candidate Donald Trump disrupted establishment politics in 2016 when he ran for president and defeated establishment politicians on both sides of the aisle, he has completely upended traditional foreign policy in the United States. Pinstriped Foggy Bottom bureaucrats are still in shock with President Trump's aggressive and — apparently — effective approach to North Korea's recalcitrant Kim Jong-un.

Illustration on solving remaining questions over sound immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Restoring integrity to the immigration system

In 1990, Congress created the investor visa green card program to bring entrepreneurial talent to the United States, create new jobs and infuse new capital into our economy, especially in hard-hit rural and depressed areas. Unfortunately, over the years this program — known as the EB-5 program — has strayed further and further from congressional intent and has been repeatedly tarnished by scandal and political favoritism.

In this image posted on a photo sharing website by an Islamic State militant media arm on Monday, May 30, 2016, a military vehicle burns as ISIS fighters battle Iraqi forces and their allies west of Fallujah, Iraq. Iraqi forces battling their way into Fallujah repelled a four-hour attack by the Islamic State group in the city's south on Tuesday, a day after first moving into the southern edges of the militant-held city with the help of U.S.-led coalition airstrikes.(militant photo via AP)

A bombshell breach of security issues

The admonition "do not brag" likely will not be found in any intelligence manual. But strictures on revealing "sources and methods," as well as common sense, dictate that certain matters are not discussed in public.

Illustration on feminists'euphemistic treatment of prostitution by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Whitewashing a sordid industry

If you think feminists everywhere are celebrating the prosecution of the world's largest online sex market, Backpage.com, as a major blow against the exploitation of women, you would be wrong. The Women's March is perhaps the most vocal and visible group to self-appropriate the label "feminist," but others as well have come down decisively on the side of prostitution as sexually empowering because "the real mark of feminism is trusting women to do what they want with their bodies."

A bad week for Democrats

The blue wave that Democrats are counting on to win the day in November, and the Congress with it, just can't seem to break out of the swamp. This week's party primaries were counted on to produce candidates moderate enough, or at least sane enough, to restore credibility to Democratic prospects. It didn't happen quite that way.

Maryland not home of lacrosse

Is it really true that "Marylanders think of their state as the spiritual homeland of lacrosse"? ("The Mohawks who made Maryland's lacrosse sticks," Web, May 13). While I certainly would not wish to take away from the fine tradition of high-level lacrosse played in Maryland since around the turn of the 20th century, anyone who thinks the state is the "spiritual homeland" of the game really knows absolutely nothing about lacrosse.

Violence on border no 'protest'

The media has a strange characterization of recent events on the Israeli border. Even an article in The Washington Times uses the word "protest" and the phrase "in Gaza" ("Israel faces diplomatic fallout after dozens killed in Gaza," Web, May 15). These are glaring errors.

Director Spike Lee pose for photographers during a photo call for the film 'BlacKkKlansman' at the 71st international film festival, Cannes, southern France, Tuesday, May 15, 2018. (Photo by Arthur Mola/Invision/AP)

Spike Lee, mired in anti-Trumpism, misses higher mark

- The Washington Times

Spike Lee, famed black filmmaker, had a chance to soothe race relations, stoke reasoned discussions and raise a rational question or two about the current political atmosphere and culturally accepted norms. Instead, he went low. About as low as he could dredge.

In a March 23, 2018, file photo, Lori Alhadeff, center, is comforted by her husband Ilan Alhadeff, as she holds a photograph of their daughter, Alyssa Alhadeff, 14, who was killed in the shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, while they attend a news conference on gun violence, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lori Alhadeff announced her candidacy Tuesday, May 15, 2018, for a seat on the school board in the district that includes the city of Parkland, where Stoneman Douglas is located. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

Scot Peterson's $8K-plus pension: It pays to be cowardly

- The Washington Times

It pays to be cowardly, it seems -- at least, for Broward County Sheriff's Office deputies. Scot Peterson, the deputy who was captured on video hiding outside the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School building as shooter Nikolas Cruz tore up the inside and killed 17, has been granted a pension -- a taxpayer-funded pension -- of $8,702 per month.

In this May 3, 2017, file photo, former President Barack Obama speaks at a community event on the Presidential Center at the South Shore Cultural Center in Chicago. The Obama Presidential Center will not be a part of the presidential library network operated by the National Archives and Records Administration. Public park advocates have filed a lawsuit against the city of Chicago seeking to stop construction of the center. The group also wants to bar the city from giving control of the center's site to the Obama Foundation. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)

Barack Obama gilds his legacy

This is a story of priorities and hypocrisy, brought to us by a president who saved the Union and was murdered for it, and a president whose policies and malevolence damaged both the nation and the world, and who is being rewarded for it.