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Illustration on the end of Net Neutrality regulations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Network neutrality comes to an end

They finally did it. After six months of debate, during which it received over 23 million public comments (of which half may have been fraudulent), the Federal Communications Commission voted on Dec. 14 to eliminate the network neutrality rules it imposed on broadband network operators during the Obama era.

Illustration on Hanukkah by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hanukkah, the first battle against transnationalism

Many think of Hanukkah as a fight for religious freedom. While religious freedom was at stake, it was part of a broader battle in behalf of the concept of national identity. The Maccabees, local Judeans who spearheaded the revolt against the overpowering northern Syrian Greeks, and who inspired the grass-roots, did so for the overarching cause of retaining Judea’s identity and Jewish character, which was under assault by those trying to denude Judea of its distinctiveness.

Illustration on global harmony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

People, planet and climate working together

Another year of weather is coming to a close. Even with some record-breaking snowfall from this past weekend’s storm in the eastern U.S., in many ways weather this year was not much different from any other year since the regular recording of temperature, precipitation and wind began across much of the globe 150 years ago.

Trump Administration Record on School Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping his promise about school choice

During the 2016 presidential campaign, candidate Donald Trump spoke passionately and often about school choice. Some school choice advocates, however, are beginning to rumble about the lack of progress on this key domestic policy promise. This grumbling has been building for some time among “talking heads” in the think-tank world.

Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off the stage with wife Kayla Moore after he spoke to supporters after an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. Moore didn't concede the election to Democrat Doug Jones. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

What Roy Moore’s defeat portends

There were plenty of reasons why Republican Roy Moore’s defeat in the scandal-plagued Alabama election was a blessing for the GOP, despite losing a seat in a closely divided Senate.

Illustration on the GOP and the death penalty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Republicans reconsidering the death penalty

The mere idea of Republicans sponsoring death penalty repeal bills in great numbers was once considered an unlikely notion. However, Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty recently released a report revealing how Republicans are championing measures to end capital punishment at never-before-seen rates.

Doug Jones is greeted by a supporter before speaking during an election-night watch party Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. Jones has defeated Republican Roy Moore, a one-time GOP pariah who was embraced by the Republican Party and the president even after facing allegations of sexual impropriety. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Doug Jones — and Trump’s life just got a lot harder

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has been beating a dead horse in Congress for almost a year now, trying to pass his agendas legislatively through a Senate that’s dominated by Republicans yet consistently falls to Democratic Party will because of an ever-looming threat of filibuster. It’s only going to get tougher for Trump. Prepare for the stalled and even dropped legislation.

Illustration on Iranian influence in the Persian Gulf region by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s indirect strategy for regional influence

Last month, Yemen’s Houthis, the Iranian-supported rebel faction that now dominates the southern Persian Gulf’s most volatile state, fired a ballistic missile that came close to the Saudi capital, Riyadh, before being intercepted by the country’s military. The incident was a clear sign of the deepening sectarian conflict between Tehran and Riyadh now taking place throughout the Middle East. But it was also an accurate reflection of the sort of asymmetric tactics being prioritized by Iran in its strategy for regional dominance.

An open process for revamping net neutrality

While the pall of scandals and alleged scandals in the nation’s capital may have many voters thinking of the Beltway as a dysfunctional wasteland, the reality is that much of the machinery of government is, in fact, going full throttle trying to create jobs and spur growth. Only you wouldn’t know it from the daily news cycle.

Invisible Political Hand Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The invisible hand of economics

The invisible hand of American presidential politics is economics. Almost imperceptibly guiding the electorate, no other issue is as determinant of a presidency’s success. Currently, it is supporting Donald Trump through his political problems and could push him to re-election, as it has so many others.

In this Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson, file)

Drain the education swamp: College students’ tyrannical behavior must be stopped

How many conversations have we had with our friends, family and co-workers wondering what happened to the millennials? We expect a new generation to have new ideas and new ways of approaching the world. So how do we explain when a new generation is steeped in bullying, complaining about hurt feelings, demanding “safe spaces,” and using pride in fragile egos and weakened emotional states as the excuse to condemn free speech?

Illustration on China's role in diffusing the North Korean nuclear threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Nobody’s fool over North Korean nukes

Our news-hack kids — or, as Obama chief spinner Ben Rhodes called them, the “27-year-old know-nothings” — don’t have a clue as to the operative history of the North Korean nuclear threat to Asia, the Pacific and the United States.

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More Americans must reproduce

I am kind of lost when it comes to all this talk about a "baby bust," fertility and the declining birth rate ("On Rubio-Lee Amendment, Republicans missed chance to stem 'baby bust,'" Web, Dec. 7). I have heard arguments from several quarters as to the main reason, but my question is, Who is and is not having children?

Changing tide in politics?

Our country is in the midst of a civil war from which has grown a revolution. Truth be told — and it is being told finally — events such as ex-comedian Al Franken resigning from the Senate over the current and suddenly fashionable witch hunt are the least of the concerns of Democrats and even some Republicans.

In this July 6, 2017, file photo, former Sheriff Joe Arpaio leaves the federal courthouse in Phoenix, Ariz. (AP Photo/Angie Wang, File)

Go, Joe: Sheriff Arpaio eyes Sen. Jeff Flake's seat

- The Washington Times

Former Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio, the law enforcer who raised the hackles, to put it mildly, of the Eric Holder-esque social justice crowd, announced in an interview with The Daily Beast that he's seriously considering a run at Jeff Flake's Senate seat. Why not -- Jeff won't need it.

In this Aug. 18, 2012, file photo demonstrators display signs with crossed mosques during a protest in front of a mosque in Berlin, Germany. (AP Photo/Gero Breloer, file)

Germany, overrun, paying migrants to go home

- The Washington Times

Germany apparently is so overrun with migrants that government geniuses -- the same ones who opened the doors wide to mass migration in the first place -- are now paying them big bucks to take a hike and go home. So much for bleeding heart amnesty, yes?

In this May 12, 2016, file photo, signage is seen outside a restroom at 21c Museum Hotel in Durham, N.C. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

Delaware parents show teeth and halt gender self-ID in tracks

- The Washington Times

Parents in Delaware, apparently tired of the ridiculousness, took on education bureaucrats and told them, in no uncertain terms -- and on the wings of 8,000-plus signed petitions -- that a rule allowing kids in grades K-12 to self-identify their sexes without parental permission or even notification, did not meet with their approval.

A Little Love for Roy Moore Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Another perspective on Roy Moore

Roy Moore's name is indelibly linked to sexual predation; but do you know the specific accusations and accusers? Quite a number of women say that Mr. Moore asked them out when they were aged 16 to 18, and that he got their parents' permission to do so. All this, 26 to 40 years ago. It's worth looking carefully at the claims and the evidence.

Illustration on the benefits of the GOP tax reform plan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Democratic tax-cut doomsayers

Earlier this week House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi predicted somewhat apocalyptically that passage of the Republican tax bill would quite simply mean "the end of the world." It is true that the lady from the Bay is given to hyperbolic overstatement, but she seems to see herself as the leader of a party and movement that views those who disagree with them as bent upon destruction, murder and, yes, ending the world.

Illustration on diplomacy and economic sanctions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Gauging the impact of economic sanctions

Carl von Clausewitz thought of military war as a continuation of diplomacy through other means. Economic sanctions are economic war and should be similarly regarded as tactics subordinated to a diplomatic strategy.

Illustration on the history of American money, banks and debt by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How America blazed a trail for government debt

As the United States faces a national debt of more than $20 trillion as a result of profligate spending — and looks to raise that ante with tax cuts — it should be noted that this untoward policy was begun exactly 327 years ago on Dec. 10. Massachusetts became the first colony to borrow money by issuing a paper currency — and the first in the history of Western Civilization (the Chinese were actually the inventors, putting forth notes as early as 806 A.D.).

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., joined by, from left, Small Business Administration Administrator Linda McMahon, Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., and Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., speaks to a group of small business owners as Republicans work to pass their sweeping tax bill, a blend of generous tax cuts for businesses and more modest tax cuts for families and individuals, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The fiscal mess that tax cuts won't fix

We've heard a lot of frightening figures in the last week or so as the Senate approved a tax cut bill that is now in a conference with the House to iron out big differences between the two versions.

Michigan attorney general candidate Dana Nessel.

Can the world be saved from the penis?

A good man is hard to find, so the common wisdom once went, but in the spirit of the hysteria season certain feminists have rewritten that to, "Never trust a man with his factory equipment intact." A woman in Michigan is running hard for state attorney general as the Democratic candidate with a missing penis.

Demonstrators are arrested outside of the U.S. Capitol during an immigration rally in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and Temporary Protected Status (TPS), programs, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Playing chicken on the border

Chicken is a game usually won by the boldest and most irresponsible player in the game. Democrats usually prevail because they know how to place the blame on the other player. Republicans, eager to avoid being seen as not very nice, usually threaten no one and settle for a friendly pat on the head. But this time they must gird their bashful loins, grit their teeth and refuse to yield. At stake is more than money. With the immigration issue on the table the outcome is a matter of national security.

EU was lousy deal for U.K.

Americans, even the best-informed, often make the mistake of thinking the United Kingdom joined the European Union "for the money" when, in fact, we have been for decades massive financiers of the EU (some $504 billion since we joined).

Kudos to Trump on Israel move

President Trump is the first president to have the ethical fortitude to proclaim that Jerusalem is the eternal capital of Israel. Jerusalem is important only because the Jews made it important. History proves that Arabs and other Muslims customarily considered Jerusalem a backwater. In 1995 Congress passed the Jerusalem Embassy Act, requiring the movement of the American embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital, even 22 years later, affirms Israel's sovereignty. By removing the United States from the position of pressuring Israel to sacrifice its historic, religious and strategic capital, Israel will now be able to negotiate on its own behalf.

Isabel Archer's life beyond 'Portrait'

If you have not read Henry James' "Portrait of a Lady," you may have a hard time getting into John Banville's "Mrs. Osmond." It picks up the tale of Isabel Archer, now Mrs. Gilbert Osmond, pretty much where James had left her. She had defied her husband and gone to England to see her dying cousin Ralph.