Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Illustration on Kim Jong-un's diplomatic wish list by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What Kim Jong-un really wants

If one were to make a list of “what Kim really wants” in his discussions with the U.S., such would be quite straightforward, however — at least so far — they have not been expressed as such.

Illustration on Nafta by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The need for NAFTA

Finally some good news for the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). CNBC is reporting and my White House sources confirm that there may be the framework for a renewed and improved NAFTA in the weeks ahead.

Illustration on fiscal responsibility and spending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Budget blame where it belongs

While tax cuts take the budget blame, spending does the debt damage. Proponents of big government spending are happy to stoke the latest story in the narrative that America is under-taxed.

Barbara Bush Photo Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Barbara Bush, one of a kind

A beautiful person, no other way to say it. Barbara Bush was one of a kind, pushing through challenges most lives never see, with a hallmark smile, clear eyes and unwavering faith.

House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway, R-Texas, joined at left by Vice Chairman Glenn Thompson, R-Pa., announces the new farm bill, officially known as the 2018 Agriculture and Nutrition Act, at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 12, 2018. The bulk of the bill's spending goes toward funding SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Faith leaders skew Bible to oppose SNAP reform

- The Washington Times

Faith leaders are coming out in full force to oppose the Republican-sponsored Farm Bill released in the House that imposes stricter work requirements on those receiving food stamps. Do not be fooled by their so-called Christian arguments in opposition of this bill. Their arguments are neither Christian nor common sense.

The Birth of a New Economic Recovery Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The optimists may be right

In January, Wall Street investors were optimistic tax cuts would sustain economic growth and the Trump bull market. As spring arrives, the world has proven decidedly more uncertain.

Illustration on the costs of Elon Musk's Space X by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The crony capitalist in free market clothing

You might imagine that pro-capitalism, free-market folk like me would just love what Elon Musk has done in the past couple of decades but you’d be wrong. I enjoy his entrepreneurial spirit and success, founding company (zip2) after company (PayPal) after company (The Boring Co.) and turning them into properties worth billions and then moving along to the next new thing. Props and kudos to this son of South Africa and prototype for “Iron Man.” You got those parts right.

Related Articles

In this May 3, 2017, file photo, then-FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) ** FILE **

Why would Trump ask the FBI to investigate 'Pee Tape' if it was real?

- The Washington Times

Lost in the breathless reporting over the former FBI Director's assertion that Trump asked him to investigate the most salacious items in the political propaganda known as the Russian dossier is a basic logical question: Why would Trump unleash the full investigative power of the Federal Bureau of Investigation on the golden shower story if there was even the slightest chance it was true?

In this June 8, 2017, file photo, Former FBI Director James Comey reacts during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) ** FILE **

James Comey tell-all strikes as revengeful rip of Donald Trump

- The Washington Times

It's not that the nation doesn't already know of James Comey's utter contempt for President Donald Trump. But there's something about putting hatred to print that makes it all the more vicious. And that's what Comey seems to have done with his new tell-all book, poised to hit bookstores across the country. It's his way of getting the last word with the president -- his way of exacting a revenge for being fired.

Columbus Blue Jackets left wing Artemi Panarin (9) celebrates his game-winning goal in overtime with Nick Foligno (71), Brandon Dubinsky (17), Ian Cole (23) and David Savard (58) in Game 1 of an NHL first-round hockey playoff series against the Washington Capitals, Thursday, April 12, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)

LOVERRO: Worst Game 1 loss since the last worst Game 1 loss

It's clear the Washington Capitals don't appreciate the postseason hump they carried into the opening round of the Stanley Cup playoffs Thursday night at the arena, because they only made it bigger by blowing a gift of a 2-0 lead, losing game one in overtime 4-3 to the first wild-card team in the Metro Division, the Columbus Blue Jackets.

Illustration on Paul Ryan's fiscal legacy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Paul Ryan's budget legacy

Paul Ryan's decision to retire from Congress is a tough hit for House Republicans. His calm, steadfast leadership has been a steadying hand over a couple of tumultuous years. Perhaps his biggest selling point to his colleagues to take the difficult votes was that he, himself, made the difficult decision to move into the big office. Like Cincinnatus, he didn't want the job. And that's one of the things people liked most about his ascension to the office of Speaker.

Illustration on government budget cuts by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why rescission is a must

Conservatives are horrified by the staggering $21 trillion in debt as well as the trillion dollar deficits we are running each year as a result of the latest omnibus bill and spending trajectory. Last month, my office's phones were ringing off the hook with constituents dismayed that Washington is once again dramatically growing the size of government and their kids' debt bill.

Illustration on a U.S. China trade deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Cutting a deal with China

The Trump strategy to radically change trade and investment relations with China is well-intentioned but poorly conceived.

Hoeschler Tower at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. (Wikipedia)

Remembering Pat Korten

- The Washington Times

Pat Korten, who died after a stroke last week, was one of the unsung heroes of the early conservative movement. We were students together at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, which in the mid-Sixties was morphing into an ideological battleground much like Berkeley in the West and Columbia in New York. The campus left, often encouraged by the university's left-wing faculty, was on the march and growing increasingly intolerant.

Illustration on the southern border wall by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Donald Trump's wall

In his blockbuster 2016 campaign for president, Donald Trump made a lot of big proposals to fix our country's problems that he said could be accomplished relatively quickly.

Sarah Bernhardt. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Paul Ryan and the long goodbye

- The Washington Times

The speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives has a difficult job. He has to spend a lot of time with congressmen, after all, and the typical congressman, Republican or Democrat, is composed of two pounds of ambition, three pounds of compressed gas and eight ounces of brains, stuffed into a one-pound bag. Who can deny him a hermitage in the Wisconsin wilds.

Trump galvanized by opponents

After a week of stock-market tumult due to fears of President Trump "sparking a trade war with China," buried in the news of fake presidential scandals recently was that the almighty China has capitulated to our president's fiery rhetoric — and will cut tariffs on imports into the world's largest economy. This is yet another monumental victory for Mr. Trump.

Investigate privilege breach

I was saddened to read of the Mueller investigation forwarding information to the New York arm of the Justice Departmet, a move that resulted in actions which shattered attorney-client privilege.

A sleuth, some pubs and a feisty child

Eccentrically named and sometimes bizarre pubs have long been part of the British scene, yet Martha Grimes is perhaps the only mystery writer who has made a literary career out of places like The Only Running Footman, The Old Wine Shades and, now, The Knowledge.

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich introduces Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a campaign rally in Fort Myers, Fla., on Sept. 19, 2016. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Gingrich goes there -- compares FBI's raid of Cohen to Nazis

- The Washington Times

Newt Gingrich, former speaker of the House, ripped into the FBI for its raid on President Donald Trump's personal attorney, Michael Cohen, comparing the federal action to the Nazi regime. And insofar as the rather ridiculous raids on Cohen's files go -- he's got a bit of a point. These are moves that ring more of Gestapo, less of constitutional America -- more of police state, less of republic, land of the law.

Former FBI Director James Comey smiles during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Thursday, June 8, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Lanny Davis: I would've advised President Hillary to fire Comey

- The Washington Times

President Trump's dismissal of James Comey (based on the recommendation of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein) caused a firestorm in Washington and eventually triggered the naming appointment of Robert Mueller as Special Counsel to investigate allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russians to meddle in the 2016 election. But, according to a close Hillary Clinton confidante, had she won the election, she would have possibly fired Comey as well... and for the exact same reason.