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Vladimir Putin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Everybody’s playing the new game in town

- The Washington Times

Washington measures everything and everyone by politics, and dysfunction is the new game in town. Rant and rage has become the lingua franca of the nation’s capital. Taking the measure of Robert Mueller’s indictment of 13 Russian cybernauts for interfering on Vladimir Putin’s behalf in the 2016 presidential campaign is easy.

China's Jack Ma, Alibaba Group founder and executive chairman, speaks during a panel session during the 47th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum, WEF, in Davos, Switzerland, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017. (Laurent Gillieron/Keystone via AP) ** FILE **

Artificial intelligence can read! And now customer service reps must go

- The Washington Times

An economic boom just dropped on the world — and most, no doubt, aren’t even aware. What happened? China’s retail and technology conglomerate, Alibaba, developed an artificial intelligence model that beat the humans it competed against in a Stanford University reading and comprehension test. This is historic.

Illustration on the need for clearer scrutiny and vetting for firearm purchases by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Confronting school shootings

In the emotional aftermath of every school shooting, experts criticize and offer solutions. “Arm teachers, more cops, fewer guns, psychiatric commitments and barbed wire perimeters.” We can also have lengthy discussions on the disintegration of the family, but any real change is generations away. So, what now?

Philadelphia Aliens Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the radical agenda meets immigration

Liberal Democrats don’t like the broad term illegal immigrants, so the joke goes, as they much prefer to think of them as undocumented future registered Democrats.

In this Dec. 4, 2017 photo, Southwest Minnesota hog producer Randy Spronk poses at his farm near Edgerton, Minn. Minnesota farmers like Spronk fear they could lose millions of dollars if the United States leaves the North American Free Trade Agreement.  (Mark Steil/Minnesota Public Radio via AP)

The trouble with tariffs

The stronger economy we’re enjoying now is no accident. Lower taxes, more jobs and fewer regulations are creating a much-needed boost. So why do we still have one foot on the brake?

Crumbling Infrastructure (Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times)

A tax proposal to nowhere

Repairing the nation’s highways is a good idea. Paying for it with a uuuuuuuge increase in the federal gasoline tax is not a good idea. Donald Trump has had some good ideas over his first year in the White House, but socking it to motorists is not one of them.

Illustration on the aggressive strategic future of Syria by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The new ‘great game’ in Syria

In the second half of the 19th century, the British and Russian empires competed for domination of Central Asia in what history labels “The Great Game.” A new “great game,” with the entire Middle East at stake, is now being played out in Syria. The opponents are Russia and Iran on one side and the U.S. and Israel on the other. Both sides will try to use Arab states and Turkey as pawns.

Logical Progression of a Gun Ban Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More laws do not a moral people make

This past Valentine’s Day, Nikolas Cruz entered a classroom in Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and proceeded to murder 17 people and wound 15 others. Before any meaningful criminal investigation could even begin, our nation’s cultural elites rushed to their respective podiums, finding fault and casting aspersions. Scoring political points is the name of the game. Removing personal rights embedded in our Constitution and replacing them with more laws and less freedom seems to be the only way they know to keep score.

Chart to acccompany Moore article of Feb. 19, 2018.

Obama’s real debt and deficit legacy

- The Washington Times

Congressional Republicans have been raked over the coals in the last two weeks for slamming through budget caps and inflating government spending and debt by another $300 billion. The criticisms are well deserved.

Unrest in India Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

India’s democracy and Modi’s reforms

If there’s one thing we’ve learned about Prime Minister Narendra Modi is that he’s not afraid of using radical maneuvers to accomplish his economic agenda for India.

Kim Yo-jong, sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, arrives at the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018. (Associated Press)

The snookered press at Pyeongchang

- The Washington Times

When Kim Jong-un dispatched his crack propaganda team to Pyeongchang (and not P.F. Chang, the Chinese restaurant chain, as reported by NBC News) to cover the Winter Olympics, he couldn’t have imagined that the American media in town would have been so easy to con.

Illustration on history repeating itself in U.S. involvement in Afghanistan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How Afghanistan can take the road not taken in Vietnam

We haven’t heard much about Afghanistan in the news lately. Occasionally, an American will be killed, or there will be a bombing, but the current U.S. strategy of the “Afghanization” seems to have produced a stalemate that is not necessarily a bad thing.

Patent Law Working Properly Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Patent reform and innovation

On February 5, the Senate confirmed Andre Iancu as director of the Patent and Trademark Office.

Related Articles

Stop Iran now

Last weekend, with the infiltration of a drone into Israeli airspace, we saw a blatant and provocative move from the Iranian regime. In response, Israel launched military strikes in Syria. For years now Iran has been expanding its tentacles in the Middle East, and it is only growing stronger.

Defending what is best in America

Roger Kimball, editor and publisher of The New Criterion, a monthly magazine named for The Criterion, a British literary magazine edited by T.S Eliot in the 1930s, is also the publisher of Encounter Books, which took its name from the literary magazine founded by Irving Kristol and Stephen Spender.

Illustration by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

Zoning out on free speech

"The Death of Free-Speech Zones," reads a recent headline in Inside Higher Education. It's a demise that anyone who believes in the First Amendment can cheer.

Former President Barack Obama, left, speaks at the unveiling ceremony for the Obama's official portraits at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, Monday, Feb. 12, 2018, in Washington. Obama's portrait was painted by Artist Kehinde Wiley, and Michelle Obama's portrait was painted by Artist Amy Sherald. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Barack Obama's portrait -- a real 'what is that!' moment

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama's official portrait unveiling just went forth at the National Portrait Gallery -- and boy, was it a WTFreak moment. Was that a giant fern in front of which Obama was seated? It reminded of his interview with Zach Galifianakis of "Funny or Die" fame and the "Between Two Ferns" chat.

From left, North Korea's nominal head of state Kim Yong Nam, South Koran President Moon Jae-in, his wife Kim Jung-sook, and Kim Yo Jong, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's sister, wave after a performance of North Korea's Samjiyon Orchestra at National Theater in Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, Feb. 11, 2018. A rare invitation to Pyongyang for South Korea's president marked Day Two of the North Korean Kim dynasty's southern road tour, part of an accelerating diplomatic thaw that included some Korean liquor over lunch and the shared joy of watching a "unified" Korea team play hockey at the Olympics. (Bee Jae-man/Yonhap via AP)

Media go ga-ga on North Korea in gag-me Olympic lovefest

- The Washington Times

It's not entirely unusual for the mainstream media to be slammed as little more than a mouthpiece for the left. But loving on the dictatorships? That's exactly what some seem to be doing, with all the heaping of praise that's been piled on Kim Jong-un's sister, who's attending the Olympics -- or, as The New York Times would put it, in this glaring headline: "Kim Jong-Un's Sister Turns On the Charm, Taking [Mike] Pence's Spotlight."

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg reacts to the welcome she receives before participating in a "fireside chat" in the Bruce M. Selya Appellate Courtroom at the Roger William University Law School on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, in Bristol, R.I. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)

Ginsburg: Election 2016 too 'macho' for Hillary to win

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton has spent most of her days, post-election, pining about her loss and blaming it on the deplorables who followed President Donald Trump -- the co-called sexist, misogynist atmosphere she perceives as marking her race to the White House. Well now, here comes Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, tossing the same gender card. And not for the first time, either.

Stockton California in a Glass Box Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Free money and pigeons

According to The Washington Post, which should know, Democrats are moving even farther left in an effort to appeal to more Americans.

Illustration on America's mineral abundance by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Making America a strategic mineral superpower

- The Washington Times

Why is the United States reliant on China and Russia for strategic minerals when we arguably have more of these valuable resources than both these nations combined? This has nothing to do with geological impediments. It is all politics.

Illustration on the danger of trade retaliation by China by Linas Garsys/the Washington Times

How Trump's trade policy courts disaster

Of all the economic policies President Trump has marked for attention this year — merit-based immigration, infrastructure and vocational training — fixing the trade deficit offers the biggest bang for the buck.

Due Credit for the Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The 2017-2018 economic recovery

Whatever happened to the New Normal? First, Obama Democrats told us that what looked like long-term stagnation under President Obama's economic policies, with growth stuck at 2 percent on average for his whole eight years in office, was the New Normal that the American people were going to have to get used to, the best we could do now.

File - In this Friday, Oct. 19, 2012 file photo, students study in a library on the campus of California State University, Long Beach in Long Beach, Calif. California State University is considering raising tuition in 2018-19 for the second straight year, a move trustees say would be a last resort if the state does not chip in more funding for the country's largest university system. The Board of Trustees said Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, that Gov. Jerry Brown's proposed state budget, released earlier this month, allocates a fraction of what the system's 23 campuses need to maintain their quality of education at a time of record-high enrollment. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

First and second things, character and color

C.S. Lewis told us in "God in the Dock": "Put first things first and second things are thrown in. Put second things first and you lose both first and second things." In his publication titled First Things, Richard John Neuhaus warned, "One must never underestimate the profound bigotry and anti-intellectualism [of second things]."

An athlete from team USA points during the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018. (Clive Mason/Pool Photo via AP)

Dark skin and gold medals

If race-consciousness becomes an Olympic sport, and who can say it won't, the United States will have a lock on the gold medal. Silver and bronze, too. There's no escaping race obsession that thrives in every crevice, cleft, nook and cranny in America. A body can step on it unaware everywhere.

Time for term limits

Watching the stone-faced Democrats sitting on their hands during President Trump's State of the Union address prompted me to conclude that their wish is for bad things to happen to the country while Mr. Trump and the Republicans are in control.

Labs shadows of former selves

Kudos to Peter Pry for pointing out the need to clean house at the Department of Energy, and to The Washington Times for publishing his op-ed ("Dereliction of duty at the Department of Energy," Web, Feb. 7).

When Nazis attacked the American movie industry

As Adolph Hitler tried to spread his Nazi tentacles beyond Germany in the 1930s, he benefited from a so-called "fifth column" of ideological supporters in several nations, notably France.