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Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Gropergate! The halls of Congress under siege!

- The Washington Times

When I was a young reporter on a certain newspaper in the South, fresh on a new job, I took a fancy to a sweet and pretty young woman (that’s how we talked in those days) working on what newspapers quaintly called “the Society pages.”

Why Trump should arm Ukraine

President Trump has often expressed his desire to build a better, more positive relationship with Russia. However, as Secretary of State Tillerson has said, improved bilateral relations will not be possible without ending Russia’s aggression against Ukraine.

Illustration on the restoration of the Alamo by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Restoring, reinforcing and remembering the Alamo

As a native Texan, as a veteran, and as Texas land commissioner, it is my solemn duty and my great honor to be the caretaker of the Alamo. Who we are as Texans started there and who we can be as Texans and Americans still lives there.

Illustration of George Papadopoulos by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Russian shadow

Thank goodness we live in a country where the people who represent us in Congress have the power to investigate and grill federal officials to root out wrongdoing in our government.

Illustration on Brett McGurk by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Following Obama’s footsteps toward Kurdistan’s destruction

Brett McGurk, an Obama appointee serving under President Trump, is working in order to ensure that the United States continues to follow Barack Obama’s failed Iraq policy even though the U.S. now has a Republican president.

United Nations U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley, right, listens as Organization of American States Secretary General Luis Almargo speaks during a U.N. meeting on human rights concerns in Venezuela, Monday Nov. 13, 2017, at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Nikki Haley quite rightly rocks U.N. boat on Venezuela

- The Washington Times

Human rights matter — that’s the message a resolute U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley just sent the Security Council’s way, reminding that Venezuela, land of the socialists, shouldn’t be allowed to skate on civil abuses. This is why Haley rocks. She’s unafraid to take the high ground on behalf of America, even when world players disapprove.

Illustration on the sexual vulgarization of the American culture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the cheap and dirty loses its punch

In the high-tech world of social media, where fake news thrives with the real, we’ve become a nation of voyeurs and eavesdroppers. Consuming the salacious is the guilty pleasure. We see and overhear a broad range of sordid comings and goings, what we used to describe quaintly as “dirty,” in the vocabularies that were once reserved for private conversations between close friends, too embarrassing for general discussion.

Illustration on CFPB by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The ‘Equifax’ threat to small-dollar loan customers

There are many flaws in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) small-dollar loan rule, which will deny millions of Americans access to a vital form of credit. One of the biggest problems, which has become an acute problem lately, is the security of consumers’ personal financial information.

When Republicans promise but don’t deliver

Voters in New Jersey and elsewhere just sent a message to President Trump and congressional Republicans: Deliver or expect to get replaced, and planned tax cuts will hardly be enough.

Illustration on a peace initiative in the form of an international research vessel for the South China Sea               The Washington Times

Using science diplomacy in the South China Sea

Despite White House efforts to deny well-established climate change reports and U.S. withdrawal from the 2015 Paris Climate Accord, most might question the wisdom of laying down a science — led peace-building plan in the contested South China Sea disputes. Yet science may prove to be the linchpin for bringing about cooperation rather than competition not only among the claimant nations in the region but also between Washington and Beijing. While President Trump’s recent offer to Vietnam’s President Tran Dai Quang to mediate the complex and challenging disputes over access to fish stocks, conservation of biodiversity and sovereignty claims caught many observers by surprise, it should not have.

Investigation into the Investigation Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More Chronicles of Hillary

The Department of Justice will soon commence an investigation to determine whether there should be an investigation (you read that nonsense correctly) of a scandal involving the Clinton Foundation and a company called Uranium One. It appears that FBI decisions made during the time that Hillary Clinton was being investigated for espionage will also be investigated to see whether there should be an investigation to determine whether she was properly investigated. (Again, you read that nonsense correctly.)

In this Oct. 17, 2017, file photo, Army soldiers hone their long-distance marksmanship skills as they train at Fort Benning in Columbus, Ga. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Filling military quotas with the mentally ill

The Army very quietly announced in August that it will lift a ban on waivers allowing people with a history of mental health issues, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, to join their ranks. Even in normal times this should concern you greatly, let alone when the world appears to be preparing for war.

Illustration on the campaign against glyphosphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forcing taxpayers to fund anti-chemical activism

It’s bad enough when tax-exempt foundations and activist groups use junk science and scare campaigns to promote excessive regulations and set the stage for class action lawsuits against perfectly good products. It’s intolerable when our tax dollars directly finance U.S. and European Union government agencies that do likewise.

Illustration on the criminalization of government agencies by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The criminalization of America’s government agencies

The criminalization of government agencies by the Obama administration was far more extensive than previously realized. The Uranium One deal is a prime example of how key government agencies have been criminalized.

Related Articles

Illustration on Iran's attacks on the Kurds in Iraq by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Smashing a critical American ally

On Oct. 16, Iranian-backed Shia militias, together with 9,000 Iraqi government forces, armed and trained by the U.S., invaded and took Kirkuk from the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga fighters.

Illustration on Veterans Day by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Honoring America's veterans

"Freedom or Death." That was the password issued by Gen. George Washington as he and the Colonial Army prepared to cross the Delaware River to unleash a surprise attack on the Hessian soldiers camped in Trenton, N.J. What was at stake that infamous day? The answer: the very freedom of our nation. The Colonial Army were our first veterans.

Illustration on the changing political demographic of the state of Virginia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The slugfest in the Old Dominion

Virginia Republicans were licking their wounds this week after a humiliating election beating from the Democrats who swept every statewide elective office on the ballot.

Illustration on Mark Cuban by Linas Garsys/The WAshington Times

When disruption equals opportunity

Mark Cuban hinted to Harvey Levin on Sunday's "Objectified" that he is looking at running against President Trump in 2020 as a Republican, as he is fiercely "independent" and believes that there is a place in the GOP for someone who is "socially a centrist but fiscally conservative."

Deborah Simmons

SIMMONS: Be Veterans Day Strong!

- The Washington Times

The U.S. has been in Afghanistan for so long, a second generation and a third generation of "military brats" have joined the ranks. How do we count the ways to honor them?

Chicago White Sox catcher Carlton Fisk, left, chases Baltimore Orioles Al Bumbry toward first base after a dropped third strike in the first inning of Game 3 of the American League playoffs in Chicago, Oct. 7, 1983. Fisk tagged Bumbry out. (AP Photo/Bob Daugherty) **FILE**

LOVERRO: Orioles taught Bumbry a lot, Vietnam even more

Al Bumbry, like many who played in Baltimore, was brought up on the "Oriole Way," a philosophical approach to the craft of baseball that ran through the organization, particularly during the glory years. But it was in Vietnam that he learned about life and leadership.

On Nov. 11, 1989, East German border guards are seen through a gap in the Berlin Wall after demonstrators pulled down a segment of the wall at the Brandenburg Gate, Berlin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The day the Berlin Wall came crumbling down

What were you watching on Thursday, Nov. 9, 1989? For me, Nov. 9, 1989, was about watching the most significant political moment of my lifetime, the crashing down of the Iron Curtain and the fall of Russian Communism, on television from my home in rural Iowa.

From left: Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats testified before a hearing Wednesday of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. (Associated Press)

FBI counterterror chief, reportedly drunk, loses weapon

- The Washington Times

Robert Manson, a supervisor in the FBI's counterterrorism division, got drunk -- allegedly -- during a party with exotic dancers, better known as strippers, at a hotel in Charlotte, North Carolina, went to bed, woke up and found his service weapon missing. This isn't just embarrassing. It's downright dangerous to innocent Americans.

President Barack Obama, with Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker, center, and Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez, speaks during a meeting with members of his economic team in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, March 4, 2016. Obama spoke about U.S. employers adding 242,000 workers in February, driving another solid month for the resilient American job market. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Obama Foundation's newest director a tax haven hiding fat cat

- The Washington Times

One of the Obama Foundation's newest members of its board of directors is none other than Penny Pritzker, the Commerce Department secretary under the Barack Obama administration and the finance chair of Obama's 2008 campaign -- and oh yes, this too, a name that just surfaced in the Paradise Papers as tied to offshore tax havens. Well, would you look at that. One of anti-fat cat Obama's own foundation directors is an offshore tax haven sheltering fat catter.

Uranium none

Sensations that explode with a flash and a bang seize public attention, but the echo doesn't last forever. Charges of Russian collusion in the 2016 presidential election that lit up the night sky in the spring are fading now with the colors of autumn. But details emerging from cracks and crevices of the Obama administration demand attention.

In this Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017 photo, Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., addresses the Northam For Governor election night party at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017. Democratic candidate Ralph Northam won Virginia's race for governor. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

The real pain coming

The Republicans can't say they didn't deserve the spanking they got Tuesday night. The results in Virginia in particular were a wake-up call, and the Republicans have a talent for sleeping through the noise of an alarm clock. The Grumpy Old Party was cruising for a bruising, and it got one. Did the elephant learn anything?

Illustration of Harvey Weinstein by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sexual harassment just ain't what it used to be

Harvey Weinstein, who governed from the casting couch as the Stalinist emperor of Hollywood, is toppled now, done in by regiments of women who came forward with endless tales of malignant abuse. The man who made the movies worthy of 300 Oscar nominations, a man regarded in Hollywood as coming in "just after Steven Spielberg and right before God," may go on trial that could cost him his freedom. Rarely has success receded so swiftly.

All Credit No Cash Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Backing Fannie and Freddie with funny money

Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) Director Mel Watt recently made an urgent plea for Congress to decide on a long-term strategy for the government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs) Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, now in their 10th year of conservatorship overseen by his agency.

Rep. David Schweikert, R-Ariz., joined at left by Rep. Tom Rice, R-S.C., makes a point as the House Ways and Means Committee continues its debate over the Republican tax reform package, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Tax reform even Democrats can love

The principal focus of tax reform should be economic growth, not the deficit. It would be incredibly shortsighted to sacrifice growth for the deficit, because growth will eliminate the deficit. Growth is the solution. Tax reform will promote growth. Democrats should be voting for growth.

Illustration on bureaucracy and the disabled by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Disabled, and trapped in a bureaucratic backlog

Economic opportunity for all is the cornerstone of the American dream. There are many individuals, however, who face obstacles in reaching this opportunity because of their disability. These individuals have just as strong a desire to be self-sufficient as individuals without disabilities, but desire alone is not enough; the labor force participation rate for people with disabilities is just over 20 percent, compared to nearly 70 percent for people without disabilities.