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Former President Barack Obama. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Another day at work, another congressional tantrum

- The Washington Times

Throwing tantrums and shutting down the government is a bipartisan sport. Both Republicans and Democrats have now thrown this particular tantrum, like children fighting over a toy, and it’s great fun only for the tantrum-throwers. The rest of us, and that includes both Democrats and Republicans, are not much amused.

The Shutdown Schumer T-shirt Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

But it’s not the ‘Trump shutdown’

- The Washington Times

Even with the shutdown averted, Democrats continue to act as if they believe that no matter what they do, Republicans will get the blame, but reality is beginning to undermine their narrative.

In this June 21, 2017, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed-door meeting in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Mr. Mueller, shut down this sham investigation

- The Washington Times

It’s time for the Russia collusion investigation into President Donald Trump to come to a halt. It’s a sham; it’s a web of deceits. And the American people are just not that stupid that its continuance can be justified any longer.

Illustration on the need to reform Federal welfare programs by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why welfare needs reform

With Congress back in session, what’s one of the more controversial items potentially on 2018’s legislative docket? Speaker of the House Paul Ryan says welfare reform is in the cards.

A 100 percent U.S. Angus beef Colby Jack Cheeseburger as part of U.S. President Donald Trump set is seen at Munch's Burger Shack restaurant in Tokyo Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017. The cheeseburger Trump had during his recent visit to Japan is still drawing lines at the Tokyo burger joint. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

The ‘plant-based burger’ scam

Animal activist groups are making obvious headway convincing meat eaters to put down the steak, according to a GlobalData analysis that estimates as many as 6 percent of U.S. consumers currently consider themselves vegans.

In this Feb. 1, 2017, file photo, Brooklyn College students walk between classes on campus in New York. The New York state Legislature approved a budget on April 9, 2017, that includes funding for Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo's plan to offer free tuition for middle-class students at state universities. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Taming the tuition tiger

You can’t put a price on education, the saying goes, but if you did, it would be very high. And the cost falls on everyone.

FILE - In this April 11, 2017 file photo, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, center, signs a bill between Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, left, and House Speaker Michael Busch during a bill signing ceremony following the state's legislative session at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Md.  Lawmakers are poised to act early in the upcoming legislative session on two high-profile issues: paid sick leave and medical marijuana. The General Assembly gathers Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018.   Democrats, who control the assembly, are expected to make a priority of overriding Hogan's veto of paid sick leave for businesses with 15 or more employees.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

A New Year’s present for Marylanders

Most Marylanders agree that Maryland income taxes are too high. In various rankings we almost always fall into the category of the 10 worst states. For example The Tax Foundation ranks Maryland 9th highest in individual income taxes per capita; and the 2018 business tax climate index ranks Maryland among the 10 worst of the 50 states.

For several years, the resurgent oil and gas sector was almost the sole truly bright spot of the economy. (Associated Press/File)

Free markets and free trade will fuel U.S. energy dominance

To further capitalize on America’s energy renaissance, the Trump administration should reconsider and look to strengthen free trade — particularly with Canada and Mexico, our two largest energy trading partners.

Illustration on merit-based immigration policy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s merit-based immigration system

For decades, the American people have been begging and pleading with our elected officials for an immigration system that is lawful and that serves our national interest.

Tax Cut Balloons Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Lasting and transformative tax relief

A staggering 13 billion dollars. More than the value of the entire “Star Wars” franchise. That’s the minimum amount taxpayers will save under the recently-passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act now that lawmakers have made compliance with the U.S. tax code less of a chore. Taxpayers will now also save an estimated 210 million hours of time they used to squander on the clumsy 1040 “long form.” Lighter paperwork burdens like these will begin showing up in other portions of the tax code for businesses and individuals as the new law is implemented.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Jan. 22, 2018.

The Democrats’ fiscal trap

With all the talk about a possible government shutdown due to an impasse on immigration reform, no one seems to be paying attention to a story of even bigger long-term consequence. Congress is preparing a two-year budget that blows past bipartisan spending caps to the tune of $216 billion through 2019. These are the latest stunning tallies from an analysis by Congressional Quarterly. (See chart).

Former President Richard Nixon. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

An Olympian break in the war between the words

- The Washington Times

A few Ping-Pong balls broke the Cold War ice around China a generation ago, following Richard Nixon’s stunning trip to Beijing (when it was still called Peiping), and soon the United States and China were on their way to normal diplomatic relations.

Illustration on the recent nuclear alarm in Hawaii by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Hawaii error and liberal hysteria

Murphy’s Law was written to describe how governments work. It was proved yet again on January 13 when an employee of the Hawaii Emergency Management System sent a cellphone alert that said, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” The alert was false but until it was corrected almost 40 minutes later it terrified millions of residents and tourists.

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Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at the National Governors Association special session called "Collaborating to Create Tomorrow's Global Economy" in Providence, R.I., July 14, 2017. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press via AP) ** FILE **

A lesson from Canada

Talking the talk is easy. Walking the walk is not so easy. Justin Trudeau, the prime minister of Canada, thought he could take a shot at the Americans, and Donald Trump in particular, for its determination to get out-of-control immigration under something resembling control. Lesson apparently learned.

Left needs new election message

I have a suggestion for the National Democratic Party's 2018- and 2020-election message. Back in 1987, I heard Bill Clinton give a speech in which he said something I really agreed with. He said people have rights and responsibilities. Yet Democrats, he said, seem to focus too heavily on their own "rights" and seem to believe that they shouldn't (and don't) have any "responsibilities." By contrast, he said, Republicans seem to focus too heavily on their "responsibilities" and seem to believe that they shouldn't and don't have any "rights."

When terrorists kidnap, and the options for redress

Since the 1960s, Israel has been extorted by Palestinian terrorist organizations holding Israeli soldiers and civilians hostage, with Lebanese terrorist groups joining in the kidnapping-for-ransom epidemic of Israelis, including Westerners and other nationals in the early 1980s.

In this image made from video released by KRT on Jan. 1, 2018,  North Korean leader Kim Jong-un speaks in his annual address in undisclosed location, North Korea. (KRT via AP Video)  ** FILE **

Democratic dopiness: Lawmaker blames U.S. for North Korea nukes

- The Washington Times

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, a Hawaii Democrat, took to "This Week" on ABC to say that it's America's fault North Korea has nuclear designs. This is typical Democrat logic -- defending chaos and evil at all costs and pointing fingers at any source that detracts from leftist, progressive culpability.

In this Nov. 25, 2014, file photo, protesters vandalize a police vehicle outside of Ferguson city hall in Ferguson, Mo. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Blacks can be racist, too

- The Washington Times

Charles M. Blow, a black New York Times columnist, just wrote a piece for his newspaper that's bluntly titled, "Trump Is a Racist. Period." He arrives at that conclusion by simply saying it -- as if saying something conclusively makes it so.

CORRECTS SPELLING TO DIGGS NOT RIGGS Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Stefon Diggs (14) celebrates in the end zone after a game winning touchdown against the New Orleans Saints during the second half of an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. The Vikings defeated the Saints 29-24. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

LOVERRO: Stefon Diggs, NFL give us a game for history

And now the world will wake up Monday morning to the greatness of Stefon Diggs, who pulled down a dramatic game-winning catch with the clock running down to zero and led the Vikings to a 29-24 come-from-behind victory over the New Orleans Saints that they will talk about for years in the land of 10,000 lakes.

Illustration on the penumbra of Constitutional interpretation and abortion by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The deceitful road to abortion

After Roe v. Wade plaintiff Norma McCorvey became a Christian and revealed that she had not been gang raped as her legal team had claimed, many Americans came to understand that this landmark ruling that legalized abortion was based on a lie.

Unfair Trade Practices in Commercial Air Travel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trade cheating in the Middle East

Last month, President Trump laid out his foreign policy doctrine in a speech that emphasized economic security as a key piece of America's national security policy. He called for "trade based on the principles of fairness and reciprocity" and "firm action against unfair trade practices."

Influence of Tax Rates Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why taxes matter after all

One premise of modern-day "progressives," is that taxes don't have much influence on how much and when people invest, how much they work and save, or where they live. Just Google "Taxes don't matter" and you will find scores of academic studies and news stories assuring us that taxes have little or no effect on behavior.

In this Oct. 18, 2017 photo, Collinsville High School Latin teacher James Stark speaks to students in his classroom in Collinsville, Ill. Stark views his students' well being as his top priority. Teaching Latin is somewhere down the list. Stark has been a teacher for three years. At 24 years old, he was named the 2017 Illinois Latin Teacher of the Year by the Illinois Classical Conference. His students say they think of Room 225, the Latin classroom, as a sanctuary. (Derik Holtmann /Belleville News-Democrat, via AP)

When student teachers are shunned

The Oklahoma Council for Public Affairs reports that a collective bargaining group representing public schools in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, is calling for a boycott of student teachers from the local Christian university. The reason for the proposed shunning? Oklahoma Wesleyan University's president (yours truly) dared to suggest that the bad ideas presently being taught in our nation's schools might, at least in part, be responsible for the bad behavior we are seeing in our national news.

Illustration on New York's climate lawsuit by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

New York's silly climate suit

On January 10, the city of New York filed suit against BP, Chevron, Conoco-Phillips, ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch Shell. The suit accuses oil companies of causing dangerous climate change and damage to New York City, seeking monetary compensation. But history will rank this action high in the annals of human superstition.

'Refugee funds' don't go to Palestinians

The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) has exacerbated rather than helped the problems of refugees who still languish in squalid camps after 70 years ("The faded Palestinian issue," Web, Jan. 10).

TV doesn't qualify Oprah for president

In discussing voter psychology, author Aldous Huxley said in a 1958 interview, "A democracy depends on the individual voter making an intelligent and rational choice for what he regards as his enlightened self-interest " Conversely, according to Huxley, TV and radio advertising experts "try to bypass the rational side and appeal directly to these unconscious forces below the surfaces, so that you are, in a way, making nonsense of the whole democratic procedure, which is based on conscious choice on rational ground."

Climate scientists blowing hot air

Why do we keep listening to so-called "experts" who continue to change their story on climate change? As an engineer, I have found that if a set of data does not create to the results we observe, then there is a problem with the method of evaluation. The climate scientists have many years of data that they have used to predict climate-change results that have not been anywhere close to what has actually occurred.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks at a plaque dedication ceremony at the Central Park police precinct in New York, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Greasy business in the Big Apple

You might have thought that Michael Bloomberg, with his mercifully futile crusades to protect everyone from their guns and their Big Gulps, would have set a record for grandstanding by a New York City mayor that would stand through the ages. Bill de Blasio, his hulking successor, is giving the diminutive Mr. Bloomberg a real run for his money, or, actually, your money. The Bloomberg grandstand was pushed into the shade.

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump sits with Attorney General Jeff Sessions during the FBI National Academy graduation ceremony in Quantico, Va. Late last year, lawyers for Trump expressed optimism that special counsel Robert Mueller was nearing the end of his probe of Russias interference in the 2016 election. But if there was hope in the White House that Trump might be moving past an investigation that has dogged his presidency from the start, 2018 is beginning without signs of abatement.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump in the outhouse

The civil society seems to be in better hands than anyone imagined. Unfortunately, the hands are those of snowflakes, easy to melt, and forever seeking a safe place where reality never intrudes.

The Ottoman queen who practiced the art of the deal

In the early 16th century, long before the advent of newspapers, one of the few sources for breaking news was the confidential correspondence carried on by sophisticated Italian diplomats and financiers.