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Joe Louis. (National Portrait Gallery)

The septuagenarian smackdown

- The Washington Times

This won’t be “the thrilla in Manila,” or the “rumble in the jungle,” but “two clowns in a septuagenarian smackdown” should do more for the sweet science of boxing than anything since the two Joe Louis-Max Schmeling fights on the eve of World War II.

Illustration on advice for reforming the State Department by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Some advice for Mike Pompeo

Rex Tillerson was doomed from the start as secretary of State in attempting to transform the organization by making it leaner and more agile. Few would doubt that State badly needed some transformation to continue into the 21st century, but Mr. Tillerson chose the wrong model for reform and transformation. Mr. Tillerson’s designated successor, Mike Pompeo, would do well to consider some successful government transformational models that have worked.

The U.S.-Ukrainian strategic partnership

With Vladimir Putin’s recent declaration that Russia has developed very sophisticated hypersonic intercontinental missiles, he has not abandoned aggressive action at the lower spectrum of warfare. Russia’s apparent nerve agent attack in the U.K. is the latest and most brazen in a long list of hybrid warfare against Western democracies.

Illustration on the strategic importance of supporting the Kurds by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why America must help the Kurds in Syria

In recent days, the situation has deteriorated dramatically for the Kurds in Syria. According to Kurdish sources, more than 200,000 Kurds have been displaced within the past week and several hundred Kurds have been killed as Turkey and its Syrian allies take over Afrin.

More than a wake-up call for the GOP

The Pennsylvania 18th Congressional District was more than a wakeup call for House Republicans. Unless the GOP changes its posture on achieving fairness as well as growth in the economy and its relationship with President Trump, it’s doomed to a terrible shellacking in November — the kind Democrats endured in the midterm elections of 1994 and 2010.

In this Dec. 15, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State and presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to the GirlsBuildLA Leadership Summit in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

A bitter Hillary Clinton strikes again

Hillary Clinton has not had a good week. In the aftermath of her trip to India and awful comments about Americans and women in particular, most of her allies and Democrats in general were explicit that it was time for her to leave the political arena. The shorter message from Democrats to Mrs. Clinton was “shut up and go away.”

Illustration on the upcoming meeting between President Trump and Kim Jong-un by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A just resolution of the North Korean conflict

President Donald Trump’s bold decision to accept the invitation of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un for a meeting was unprecedented. Although this will be the first meeting of a sitting president with a North Korean leader, it follows a series of temporary successes the U.S. has had with North Korea during the past 25 years.

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President Donald Trump meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Oval Office of the White House, Monday, March 5, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) ** FILE **

America's love affair with Israel grows under Trump

- The Washington Times

The left likes to try to sell the line that the Palestinian Authority loves the Israelis, welcomes peace and wants nothing more than a harmonious agreement that allows both peoples to live side-by-side, in perpetual prosperity -- oh yes, and that President Donald Trump's announced move of the U.S. Embassy to Israel from Tel Avid to Jerusalem kills that plan. But apparently, the line isn't selling.

How Hillary Clinton still misses the point

Woe are the Democrats. For generations now, they've been telling the American people that only they, and their cohort of liberals and leftists, understand and truly value women. Because of their special understanding of women, only they can be trusted to do what's right politically for them, they tell us. Then came Hillary Clinton pulling the curtain back on that dangerously false narrative.

Climate Change Rations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Apocalypse now?

Since the beginning of recorded history there have been end-of-the-world predictions. In recent years we have had radio preachers, politicians and scientists declare with certainty that the world would soon end, either because of our decadent lifestyle, or because of "global warming," now known as "climate change."

Illustration on the abuse of truth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Twitter, truthiness and titillation

When talking politics, online or in person, you don't often hear anything about the "magnificent middle." You'll hear epithets like the "dirtbag left" or the wicked "alt-right," and all of the ugly free associations to commies and fascists, loonies and wackos. Moderation is mush, evenhandedness is stupid, considering two sides of an issue is so 20th century (or maybe 19th). Only one side could possibly be right.

Illustration on Trump, Stormy Daniels and freedom of speech by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

President Trump and freedom of speech

When James Madison drafted the First Amendment — "Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech" -- he made sure to use the article "the" in front of the word "freedom." What seemed normal to him and superfluous to moderns was actually a profound signal that has resonated for 227 years. The signal was that because the freedom of speech existed before the government that was formed to protect it came into existence, it does not have its origins in government.

Broward County Schools' Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The slow learners of Broward County

Broward County, Florida, is a nice progressive place with a Democratic School Board and a Democratic sheriff. The county was living the South Florida dream until Valentine's Day, when a homicidal maniac broke into one of its high schools and slaughtered 17 of its students and faculty, one of whom was an unarmed security guard and assistant football coach.

A welder fabricates a steel structure at an iron works facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Monday, March 5, 2018. United States President Donald Trump has lobbed a grenade of uncertainty onto the NAFTA negotiating table, suggesting that tariffs on Canadian and Mexican steel are now dependent on whether the countries agree to a new trade pact. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP)

U.S. trade relations

President Trump made his mark as a businessman prior to occupying the Oval Office and he often gives his sales pitch for America: The country is once again open for business.

Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Buying the Brooklyn Bridge from North Korea

President Trump is poorly served by State Department and national security advisers who recommend meeting dictator Kim Jong-un to discuss North Korea's denuclearization.

Medical Supply Shortage Effect Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When shortages strike medical supplies

As national health care costs skyrocket, the shortage of some basic medical supplies and drugs is limiting patients' access to care and threatening lives.

Larry Kudlow (Gage Skidmore via Wikimedia Commons) **FILE**

A good choice for the economy

President Trump asked a conservative gathering the other day whether, "after my first year in office, can anyone doubt that I am a conservative?" It was a plaintive cry from a wounded ego (if not a wounded heart).

Republican Rick Saccone thanks supporters at the party watching the returns for a special election being held for the Pennsylvania 18th Congressional District vacated by Republican Tim Murphy, Tuesday, March 13, 2018, in McKeesport, Pa. A razor's edge separated Democrat Conor Lamb and Saccone Tuesday night in their closely watched special election in Pennsylvania, where a surprisingly strong bid by first-time candidate Lamb was testing Donald Trump's sway in a GOP stronghold.  (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Surprise in Pennsylvania

The Democrats have proved twice that they can win congressional seats with a Republican playbook. The Grand Old Party campaigned for years with the mantra, "vote Republican, we're not as bad as you think." The plea often failed. Republicans just didn't know how bad a lot of voters thought they were.

Learn from Tillerson firing

Unfortunately the final statement of Rex Tillerson as secretary of state was an ill-concealed attack on President Donald Trump and his policies ("Tillerson urges State Department officials to forge ahead with 'integrity,'" Web, March 13). This was a case of two strong-minded men who had major differences in foreign policy, with both having little experience in the area. Mr. Tillerson's short stay brings to mind a variation on a familiar statement: Appoint in haste and fire at will.

The allure and alarm of Scandi noir

"The Sandman" is packed with isolated prisoners -- though they are not usually in a prison. One woman is buried alive for years in a coffin fitted with an airpipe so she can breathe. Others are stuffed in plastic barrels, also with airpipes that make their captivity a long-term affair. Two half-starved children are locked in an air raid shelter that's so dark they can see nothing.


It is time to say goodbye and good riddance to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). There are better ways to spend the $70 billion that SNAP receives. I don't believe the box-food program would work as a replacement, though. The poor and disabled who use SNAP would be better off using food pantries for their food needs.

Gregg Donovan, left, supporter of President Donald Trump holds a sign during a rally against a visit by President Donald Trump, Tuesday, March 13, 2018, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

Beverly Hills' best: Mexican-flag wavers demanding impeachment

- The Washington Times

The best and brightest that Beverly Hills has to offer went on full display just recently, as President Donald Trump touched down in Los Angeles for a Republican event. And by that, it's meant: Angry protesters waving Mexican flags and demanding impeachment took to the streets and waved around anti-Trump signs.