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Sen. Charles E. Schumer. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Democrats decree death in the swamp for the Dreamers

- The Washington Times

Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi and their Democratic followers laid a careful trap for their Republican tormentors, and then fell in it. The Republican leadership can keep them from climbing out if they’re smart and show a little courage.

In this Jan. 10, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump listens during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Fearful Dems preemptively strike State of Union

- The Washington Times

Democrats must be shaking in their Birkenstocks. How else to explain their many, many and many more preemptive strikes at President Donald Trump’s State of the Union speech — a speech that doesn’t even take place until Jan. 30?

Illustration on an alliance between Irael and Saudi Arabia by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A secret Middle East alliance

A Swiss newspaper, Basler Zeitung, reported recently that a secret alliance between Israel and Saudi Arabia aimed at restraining Iran’s imperial desire for a land mass between Tehran and the Mediterranean was moving into a new phase. While there aren’t formal diplomatic ties between the two countries, military cooperation does exist. In fact, the Saudi government sent a military delegation to Jerusalem several months ago to discuss Iran’s role as a destabilizing force in the region.

Perpetual Motion Money Machine Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing in a scorching market

Stocks have just accomplished a Houdini — scorching to record highs while escaping volatility. The S&P 500, which accounts for 80 percent of the value of publicly traded U.S. companies, just scored an unprecedented 14 consecutive monthly gains.

Illustration on supporting the Iranian uprising by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to support the Iranian uprising

The current Iranian “man in the street” uprising provides the United States with a unique opportunity to achieve what should be one of our core vital national security objectives: the removal of the Iranian theocracy from power. Why? Because the Iranian theocracy has been at war with the United States for over 38 years. They have caused the death of thousands of Americans, both civilian and military.

Chart to accompany Emily Baker article of Jan. 16, 2018.

Small businesses and government contracts

With the sixth round of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) negotiations set to begin in Canada later this month, news reports claim that Canadian negotiators are increasingly worried that the U.S. may unilaterally quit the agreement — something that President Trump can do with the stroke of a pen.

A model has his hair cut as he waits backstage prior to the start of Versace men's Fall-Winter 2018-19 collection, that was presented in Milan, Italy, Saturday, Jan.13, 2018. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

The cosmetology cops

Few things could be more American than volunteering to help others. So it’s a shame when our altruism is thwarted by another, far more lamentable American trait: big government.

Influence of Tax Rates Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why taxes matter after all

One premise of modern-day “progressives,” is that taxes don’t have much influence on how much and when people invest, how much they work and save, or where they live. Just Google “Taxes don’t matter” and you will find scores of academic studies and news stories assuring us that taxes have little or no effect on behavior.

Unfair Trade Practices in Commercial Air Travel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trade cheating in the Middle East

Last month, President Trump laid out his foreign policy doctrine in a speech that emphasized economic security as a key piece of America’s national security policy. He called for “trade based on the principles of fairness and reciprocity” and “firm action against unfair trade practices.”

Illustration on New York's climate lawsuit by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

New York’s silly climate suit

On January 10, the city of New York filed suit against BP, Chevron, Conoco-Phillips, ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch Shell. The suit accuses oil companies of causing dangerous climate change and damage to New York City, seeking monetary compensation. But history will rank this action high in the annals of human superstition.

In this Oct. 18, 2017 photo, Collinsville High School Latin teacher James Stark speaks to students in his classroom in Collinsville, Ill. Stark views his students' well being as his top priority. Teaching Latin is somewhere down the list. Stark has been a teacher for three years. At 24 years old, he was named the 2017 Illinois Latin Teacher of the Year by the Illinois Classical Conference. His students say they think of Room 225, the Latin classroom, as a sanctuary. (Derik Holtmann /Belleville News-Democrat, via AP)

When student teachers are shunned

The Oklahoma Council for Public Affairs reports that a collective bargaining group representing public schools in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, is calling for a boycott of student teachers from the local Christian university. The reason for the proposed shunning? Oklahoma Wesleyan University’s president (yours truly) dared to suggest that the bad ideas presently being taught in our nation’s schools might, at least in part, be responsible for the bad behavior we are seeing in our national news.

Barry Goldwater campaigning in 1964. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sorehead losers of 2016 suggest a familiar solution

- The Washington Times

President Trump goes in for his annual physical Friday, and the doctors will only look at things like his blood pressure, listen to his heart, bang on his knees with a little rubber mallet and turn him around for the ever-popular prostate exam.

Illustration on the need for a strategic approach to Iran by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why U.S. policy toward Iran must focus on strategy

President Obama’s abandonment of Iranians on the streets of Tehran in 2009 was not some random tactical mistake; it was strategic policy that sacrificed democracy in Iran in order to establish an economic and political partnership with the regime, eventually the Iran deal.

Illustration on the effects of Korean economic policy on international relations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why domestic politics matter globally

In a scenario few thought we would see again, we find ourselves anxiously observing a world leader with little more, but no less than, a catastrophically destructive military capability to threaten our allies near and far.

Related Articles

Pope Francis delivers his speech to diplomats accredited to the Holy See, during an audience for the traditional exchange of New Year greetings, in the Regia Hall at the Vatican, Monday, Jan. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, Pool)

Pope Francis admits: Not all migrants good, not all border limits bad

- The Washington Times

Pope Francis made a somewhat eyebrow-raising remark the other day -- eyebrow-raising because it's such a 180 from his normal progressive talk -- and it's one that went like this: Not all migrants are in the migrant move for the job opportunities. They're not all honorable in intent. Some, he said, may have less than praiseworthy intentions.

Rancher Cliven Bundy, center, emerges Monday, Jan. 8, 2018, flanked by his wife, Carol Bundy, left, and attorney Bret Whipple, right, from the U.S. District Court building in Las Vegas. A judge in Las Vegas on Monday dismissed criminal charges against the Nevada rancher and his sons accused of leading an armed uprising against federal authorities in 2014. (AP Photo/Ken Ritter)

Cliven Bundy case highlights what Ronald Reagan warned

- The Washington Times

It was Ronald Reagan who famously warned of the dangers of government -- who said "the most terrifying words in the English language are, 'I'm from the government and I'm here to help.' " Now, more than three decades later, it's the Cliven Bundy family who underscores that sentiment.

In this Nov. 25, 2014, file photo, people watch as stores burn in Ferguson, Mo. The one-year anniversary of the shooting of Michael Brown, which sparked months of nationwide protests and launched the "Black Lives Matter" movement, was on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Trump's insane? Democrats the party of lies, sex and rape

- The Washington Times

There's an old biblical principle that goes like this: Don't try and pull the speck from another's eye without first removing the log from your own. Democrats, on an all-courts-press to paint President Donald Trump as a mental nutcase, would do well to remember this adage.

President Donald Trump smiles while watching the NCAA National Championship game at Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Monday, Jan. 8, 2018, in Atlanta, between Alabama and Georgia. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Better facts, more humor

Are you aware that the White House, congressional offices and most major media employ "fact checkers"? Given the amount of misinformation these organizations spew, a reasonable conclusion is that the fact checkers are often biased, ignorant, or ignored.

Illustration on Trump's infrastructure budget challenges by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's opportunity to shine

President Trump demonstrated he can work with the Republicans in congress by passing the Tax Cut and Jobs Act. The nation's sagging infrastructure offers an opportunity to reach across the aisle and prove he can lead the nation in common purpose.

Illustration on Trump's infrastructure palns by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A blueprint for prosperity

When a golden spike was driven into the rails connecting the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads at Promontory Summit, Utah Territory on May 10, 1869, interstate railways annihilated distance in the space of one generation and transformed America into a unified nation from coast to coast. The cost for an American to travel across the continent dropped from $1,000 to $150.

Illustration on the tax reform bill's impact on economic growth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reaping the benefits of Trump's first year

With several weeks of January still to go, President Trump is wrapping up a masterful first year in office. Despite — or perhaps in part because of — unprecedented, unremitting hostility from the entire American establishment, Mr. Trump has redirected American policy to serve American interests. America — and the world — is already reaping the benefits.

People play hockey on the frozen Reflecting Pool at the National Mall, Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018, in Washington. The bitter cold that followed a massive East Coast snowstorm should begin to lessen as temperatures inch up and climb past freezing next week. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Some cold facts

Remember when global warming meant the planet was supposed to, well, warm up? Temperatures would rise, and all manner of ecological calamity would ensue?

Don't believe everything you hear

By any measure, most everything connected to the economy was in a downward trend during the last years of the Obama presidency. So when the mainstream media and the Democratic leadership tell you that any good news you hear about the stock market, the economy and outlook for the country is due to President Obama's policies having just started to work, don't believe them.

Reason for anti-Trump digging

Many who opposed Donald Trump winning the last election took some solace when they suddenly heard about the "deep-state" and "shadow government," and President Obama buying a house near the White House with his close confidante Valerie Jarrett. They thought somehow this could keep the Trump administration within the guidelines of law and civility and stop the new president from doing things they didn't want him to do.