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Illustration on China's dam building frenzy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China’s dam frenzy

China’s hyperactive dam building is a reminder that, while international attention remains on its recidivist activities in the South China Sea’s disputed waters, it is also focusing quietly on other waters — of rivers that originate in Chinese-controlled territory like Tibet and flow to other countries. No country in history has built more dams than China. In fact, China today boasts more dams than the rest of the world combined.

Illustration on lowering veterans' suicide rates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lowering the suicide rates of those who serve

President Donald Trump last week signed an executive order which seeks to lower suicides rates among our nation’s veterans. The order, which would take effect in March, expands mental health services for transitioning veterans upon their return home to civilian life. Mr. Trump hailed the order as a “historic step to make sure that our incredible veterans are taken care of in a proper manner.”

FISA: A Rubber Stamp to Break the Law Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Institutionalizing Watergate

The “third rate burglary” of the Democratic National Committee’s offices at the Watergate hotel in 1972 was meant to spy on the Democratic presidential campaign. Now we’re beginning to understand how a Democratic administration pried into the 2016 Republican Campaign with the assistance of the CIA, the FBI, and the Department of Justice. The Democratic Party’s media wing tries to cover the spying and pretends that it uncovered dirt.

A supporter of President Donald Trump challenges police officers and a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program during a rally outside the office of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein in Los Angeles, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) ** FILE **

Nightmare for Dreamers

DACA, “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals,” is an Obama pen-and-phone program, not one created by legislation. It was simply a policy announced by President Obama on June 15, 2013. The date was chosen because it was the 30th anniversary of Plyler v. Doe, a Supreme Court decision that barred public schools from charging illegal immigrant children tuition.

A pair of postal workers shovel the lot at the Plainville, Mass., Post Office Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018. The post office was open for business as usual.  (Mark Stockwell/The Sun Chronicle via AP)

Another view of the U.S. Postal Service

Along with political coverage and analysis generally regarded as top-flight, The Washington Times apparently also possesses a good sense of humor.

Sen. Charles E. Schumer. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Democrats decree death in the swamp for the Dreamers

- The Washington Times

Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi and their Democratic followers laid a careful trap for their Republican tormentors, and then fell in it. The Republican leadership can keep them from climbing out if they’re smart and show a little courage.

In this Jan. 10, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump listens during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Fearful Dems preemptively strike State of Union

- The Washington Times

Democrats must be shaking in their Birkenstocks. How else to explain their many, many and many more preemptive strikes at President Donald Trump’s State of the Union speech — a speech that doesn’t even take place until Jan. 30?

Illustration on an alliance between Irael and Saudi Arabia by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A secret Middle East alliance

A Swiss newspaper, Basler Zeitung, reported recently that a secret alliance between Israel and Saudi Arabia aimed at restraining Iran’s imperial desire for a land mass between Tehran and the Mediterranean was moving into a new phase. While there aren’t formal diplomatic ties between the two countries, military cooperation does exist. In fact, the Saudi government sent a military delegation to Jerusalem several months ago to discuss Iran’s role as a destabilizing force in the region.

Perpetual Motion Money Machine Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing in a scorching market

Stocks have just accomplished a Houdini — scorching to record highs while escaping volatility. The S&P 500, which accounts for 80 percent of the value of publicly traded U.S. companies, just scored an unprecedented 14 consecutive monthly gains.

Illustration on supporting the Iranian uprising by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to support the Iranian uprising

The current Iranian “man in the street” uprising provides the United States with a unique opportunity to achieve what should be one of our core vital national security objectives: the removal of the Iranian theocracy from power. Why? Because the Iranian theocracy has been at war with the United States for over 38 years. They have caused the death of thousands of Americans, both civilian and military.

Chart to accompany Emily Baker article of Jan. 16, 2018.

Small businesses and government contracts

With the sixth round of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) negotiations set to begin in Canada later this month, news reports claim that Canadian negotiators are increasingly worried that the U.S. may unilaterally quit the agreement — something that President Trump can do with the stroke of a pen.

A model has his hair cut as he waits backstage prior to the start of Versace men's Fall-Winter 2018-19 collection, that was presented in Milan, Italy, Saturday, Jan.13, 2018. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

The cosmetology cops

Few things could be more American than volunteering to help others. So it’s a shame when our altruism is thwarted by another, far more lamentable American trait: big government.

Influence of Tax Rates Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why taxes matter after all

One premise of modern-day “progressives,” is that taxes don’t have much influence on how much and when people invest, how much they work and save, or where they live. Just Google “Taxes don’t matter” and you will find scores of academic studies and news stories assuring us that taxes have little or no effect on behavior.

Related Articles

Draining the national security swamp

One year into President Trump's tenure, anti-Trump political bias in the FBI and Department of Justice is now so obvious that objective observers should fear for the future of our constitutional republic from the "deep state."

Stopping an outrageous land grab

The Mississippi gopher frog (or the "dusky gopher frog" in official federal parlance) may soon get his 15 minutes of fame, but the frog deserves better than being a pawn in a case that pits an overreaching government agency against property owners.

Book jacket: "Supreme Injustice: Slavery in the Nation's Highest Court"

Grappling with unsettling truths about slavery

Only by ignoring the pervasive presence of slavery in 18th century America is there a cohesive founding narrative for the United States as a bulwark against tyranny and a place where government is based on the concept that "all men are created equal."

Illustration on auditing the Pentagon by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why a Pentagon audit is overdue

At the beginning December 2017, the comptroller of the Department of Defense (DoD) David Norquist announced that DoD would conduct its first ever audit.

Illustration on protectionism from Whirlpool by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trade and South Korea

For the second time in a month the International Trade Commission (ITC) has invoked a rarely used provision of the 1974 International Trade Act to protect a U.S.-based company from "unfair" competition from foreign suppliers -- in this case South Korean producers of large residential washing machines or LRWs.

Illustration on bulletproof windshield for Philadelphia police cruisers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Protecting 'blue lives'

The good news is that Philadelphia police officers will soon be patrolling the city's mean streets in 150 new patrol cars that have been equipped with bulletproof windows.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in Washington. From left, Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., Trump, Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md., and Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump's new TV show -- genius at work

- The Washington Times

A Trump charm and, yes, intelligence lit up television screens all over America on Tuesday afternoon. Freed from the restraints and cautions of Bannonism, the president suddenly seems to soar like an eagle.

How 99 percent of 'Palestine refugees' are fake

In the words of a veteran Washington hand, the problem of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), the main U.N. agency dealing with Palestinians, is always important but never urgent. Well, it just became urgent.

Europe's silence

It's tempting to say that Europe's leaders lack the courage of their convictions. But that would imply that they have convictions. The evidence suggests those days are gone.

Pope Francis delivers his speech to diplomats accredited to the Holy See, during an audience for the traditional exchange of New Year greetings, in the Regia Hall at the Vatican, Monday, Jan. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, Pool)

Pope Francis admits: Not all migrants good, not all border limits bad

- The Washington Times

Pope Francis made a somewhat eyebrow-raising remark the other day -- eyebrow-raising because it's such a 180 from his normal progressive talk -- and it's one that went like this: Not all migrants are in the migrant move for the job opportunities. They're not all honorable in intent. Some, he said, may have less than praiseworthy intentions.